How do you plan a workshop? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 28 Old 05-02-2013, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 217
View BrandonD's Photo Album My Photos
How do you plan a workshop?

Hi guys,

As I've mentioned in my previous posts, I'm new to woodworking and only have a few tools under my belt. I have a 21x22ish two car garage that I have dedicated to my workshop. Currently I have a table saw & outfeed table, jointer, and a miter saw & stand, and working on a router table. I can see myself adding a drill press, planer, workbench, scroll saw and I think I'd be interested in turning wood down the road.

I see two things as 'prep' for a shop... electrical and dust collection. I only have one outlet in the garage that I've been working off of for the few projects I've done and no dust collection. I see where it would be beneficial to go ahead and do these things now while there is still space in the shop to run the lines easily. What I'm having trouble with is since I don't have all the tools yet I'm sure the shop layout will change... as such my electrical and dust collection placement needs will change as well.

How did you guys do it? Or am I thinking too hard? Might be my job (programmer) and my hobby are clashing together. I guess I just need to run the electrical and main dust lines in the most obvious places and just tie into them when I get a tool.
BrandonD is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 28 Old 05-02-2013, 11:08 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Near Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 1,505
View amckenzie4's Photo Album My Photos
I started down that path, then moved, and now I need to do it all again.

You have two options:

1) Plan everything, and then discover you did it wrong, or
2) Plan for flexibility.

As far as power goes, I figured that in a power-tool workshop, a quad outlet box every eight feet would provide power for everything forever. I'd put a pair of 220 outlets spaced evenly on each wall. Especially if you're able to do the wiring yourself, it won't add THAT much to the price, and you can be pretty sure that you'll be able to get power to anything that needs it.

For dust collection... I'd find a reasonably central point for the dust collector, then plan on branching out as you place things. There's a limit as to how much you can plan before you have all the tools, though you can make some pretty good guesses.

In the end, I went hand tool heavy, so I only have to find power for a drill press and band saw, plus a couple of outlets for things like lamps and the occasional hand-held power tool. That made my life easier, but won't work for everybody.
amckenzie4 is offline  
post #3 of 28 Old 05-02-2013, 11:15 AM
Senior Member
 
ctwiggs1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 645
View ctwiggs1's Photo Album My Photos
Just make sure you finish the garage before getting started. It's been really hard for me but I had to stop wood working for 6 months or so to get my garage finished - insulation, drywall, texturing, finishing the attic, dropping electrical, lighting, etc. Oh and I'm going to paint (walls and floors). This is my garage - no reason I shouldn't be happy when I go to work after I come home from work :)
ctwiggs1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 28 Old 05-02-2013, 11:37 AM
Hobbyist wood-butcher
 
thegrgyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Saint Charles, IL
Posts: 1,556
View thegrgyle's Photo Album My Photos
YOu could try this.... It is the Shop planner from Grizzly website. It seems to be quite helpful. I know a few people that have used it, and really liked it. Once you have a plan, then you can start running the electrical, and DC. LIke it was mentioned, plan for flexibility. Also, try to plan on only having a few items at fixed locations (TS, jointer, mitersaw), and the rest mobile. Make some flip top carts. When working in a confined space like that, you might need more space at times for your projects. Also, as far as DC goes, keep it as big as possible as long as possible, for more air volume to be moved. It wouldn't hurt to have a few locations where you have an electrical and DC hookup drop from the ceiling. They you could move a tool in place, and then proceed from there.

Hope this helps.

Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.

Last edited by thegrgyle; 05-02-2013 at 11:46 AM. Reason: added links
thegrgyle is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to thegrgyle For This Useful Post:
knotscott (05-05-2013)
post #5 of 28 Old 05-02-2013, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 217
View BrandonD's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the feedback so far. I like that tool from the Grizzly site Fabian. I'll play around with it.

I'm taking the first step soon -- picking up four 4-lamp fixtures after work today from Craigslist. That will replace the current two 2-lamp fixtures and should hopefully provide enough overhead light. Just not looking forward to emptying out that part of the attic to run the wire to the new fixtures. I actually had the foresight to run the speaker wire for my stereo before I crammed the attic full of stuff several months ago but neglected to run electrical for the lights thinking I'd just run conduit on the ceiling. Now I am questioning that as it'll prevent a smooth and clean installation of other electrical and dust collection ducts running across the garage ceiling.

I can run the electrical myself. The panel is in the garage and I have four or five open slots and probably have enough wire already. I planned on installing some receptacles on the ceiling as I will already be traversing it with conduit to get to the other side of the garage. Also because my jointer and table saw are in the middle of the room without wheels and it would be nice to drop electrical down to them instead of having a cord across the floor.
BrandonD is offline  
post #6 of 28 Old 05-02-2013, 06:00 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Salem Oregon
Posts: 201
View khowald's Photo Album My Photos
Hopefully you got lights that have some sort of cover/protection so that when you accidentally "bump" one you do not get a glass shower...this never happened to me because I have more sense than that. (I probably read about someone doing it; be careful 'cause you can cut your finger getting the glass out of your hair)
Make sure that you take the time to FINISH all painting, etcetera, prior to putting anything in the shop-that way you don't have to move everything back out to do so(think I must have read about that to) ken
khowald is offline  
post #7 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 02:14 AM
Senior Member
 
against_the_grain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 303
View against_the_grain's Photo Album My Photos
Besides websites like this one, read up as much as you can on shop tips. You will learn alot and likely will come across ideas you never thought of. Someone else said it but it bears repeating. Try to stay flexible.

^^And got a good laugh out of Ken's reply above mine.

Last edited by against_the_grain; 05-05-2013 at 02:20 AM.
against_the_grain is offline  
post #8 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 02:52 AM
crosseyed & dyslexic
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 589
View Crusader's Photo Album My Photos
My garage/shop is basically the same as yours, alittle larger but not by much. I had two outlets and two single bulb lights.
This is my machinery.
17"bandsaw--stationary
drillpress---stationary
30 gallon air comp--stationary
Chopsaw--portable
tablesaw-portable
12"disc 48" beltsander--stationary
6" jointer--portable
13" planner--portable/benchtop
mortising machine--stationary/benchtop
This is what I did.
I ran two seperate 110 breakers but into the same line, outlets spaced
every 6 feet. Total of of 6 4outlet boxes. 3 outlets on one breaker, 3 on the other.
I ran 2 220 outlets each on a seperate breaker.
I installed 2 8' overhead lights and 2 4''s
When my ancient dc finally bit the bullet I went with the Dust Rite from Rockler. Having such a small working space I felt the Dustrite would fit my needs and it has. I have the expandable hose, and yes I have to hook up each piece of equipment as needed, but it's a small price to pay to have a wall mounted dust collector.( I still need to get a seperator up and running)
I never set out with a plan as to where things were going, other than my bench and a few wall cabinets. Everything just found it's home over time.
Good luck!!
Crusader is offline  
post #9 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 06:28 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Fort Myers Fl.
Posts: 800
View garryswf's Photo Album My Photos
Brandon keep this in mind wheels ( casters) I am in the process of moving my tools into a 10x20 storage unit and for that small of an area mobility to me is the key. You on the other hand have a little more space but I still think mobility is important for certain tools.
garryswf is offline  
post #10 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 06:48 AM
Senior Member
 
fire65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 242
View fire65's Photo Album My Photos
Plan it all around the table saw, it will probably never move. Build all work benches the same height as the table saw.
fire65 is offline  
post #11 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 07:05 AM
Senior Member
 
yank's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Prattville, Alabama, USA
Posts: 320
View yank's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by khowald View Post
Hopefully you got lights that have some sort of cover/protection so that when you accidentally "bump" one you do not get a glass shower...this never happened to me because I have more sense than that. (I probably read about someone doing it; be careful 'cause you can cut your finger getting the glass out of your hair)
Make sure that you take the time to FINISH all painting, etcetera, prior to putting anything in the shop-that way you don't have to move everything back out to do so(think I must have read about that to) ken
DAMHIKT.

My father was my inspiration for woodworking, wish he was still around for more advice. Luv ya Dad.
yank is offline  
post #12 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 07:36 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 5,465
View knotscott's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegrgyle View Post
YOu could try this.... It is the Shop planner from Grizzly website. It seems to be quite helpful. I know a few people that have used it, and really liked it. ...

Hope this helps.
+1 on the free Grizzly shop planner. Great tool for trying layout concepts.
knotscott is offline  
post #13 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 03:05 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,960
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
I plan and set up around my work bench and table saw. With second considerations to jointer and drill press. Later when you get a planer. Put it on wheels and roll it into place where you can feed and retrieve your wood. Table saw requires the most space and will be used more than any other main power tool.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #14 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 09:56 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 217
View BrandonD's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the tips all. I finished installing those lights I mentioned in my last post today. I caught myself squinting previously especially towards the back of the shop. I went from two 2-lamp fixtures to four 4-lamp fixtures, or 160W to 512W.

I am going to start looking into dust collection next. Electrical will take some thinking as I think I want to build a counter along one wall with bottom and upper cabinets and obviously want that wall's receptacles to be at the proper height.

Here's a picture with the lighting installed. As you can see not much to look at, but gotta start somewhere!

BrandonD is offline  
post #15 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 10:07 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,960
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonD369
Thanks for the tips all. I finished installing those lights I mentioned in my last post today. I caught myself squinting previously especially towards the back of the shop. I went from two 2-lamp fixtures to four 4-lamp fixtures, or 160W to 512W.

I am going to start looking into dust collection next. Electrical will take some thinking as I think I want to build a counter along one wall with bottom and upper cabinets and obviously want that wall's receptacles to be at the proper height.

Here's a picture with the lighting installed. As you can see not much to look at, but gotta start somewhere!
What a bright idea. It's a great idea. Seeing is safe too. Now for me, flows give me a headache so I balance it out with some incan's. My current shop has very high ceilings with the arch welder type lights. They don't seem to bother me like the flows.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #16 of 28 Old 05-05-2013, 10:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Oakwerks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Athens, Georgia
Posts: 401
View Oakwerks's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by fire65
Plan it all around the table saw, it will probably never move. Build all work benches the same height as the table saw.
I agree with this.... I'm on my second shop, and always have the TS in the middle.... I turn it 90 degrees for long work cause my shop is
only 16 feet wide.... Most tools can stand against the wall.. My chop saw and planer are on wheels...
Oakwerks is offline  
post #17 of 28 Old 05-06-2013, 02:03 AM
Senior Member
 
Tommie Hockett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Gainesville Texas
Posts: 1,017
View Tommie Hockett's Photo Album My Photos
as far as the electrical I have lived in houses where there was only like two in in a room.It sucks .So whan I actually build my own shop I am going to overkill and put an outlet on every other stud lol.

"Courage is not knowing about when to take a life, but knowing when to spare it."
Tommie Hockett is offline  
post #18 of 28 Old 05-06-2013, 07:01 AM
Senior Member
 
Oakwerks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Athens, Georgia
Posts: 401
View Oakwerks's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommie Hockett
as far as the electrical I have lived in houses where there was only like two in in a room.It sucks .So whan I actually build my own shop I am going to overkill and put an outlet on every other stud lol.
Every 4 feet worked for me....
Oakwerks is offline  
post #19 of 28 Old 05-06-2013, 12:46 PM
Senior Member
 
Julie Mor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Posts: 404
View Julie Mor's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonD369 View Post
Here's a picture with the lighting installed. As you can see not much to look at, but gotta start somewhere!
To me, lighting is very important. Not only can you see better, but it makes the shop more inviting and makes you want to work in it. I have HO fluorescent fixtures in my shop. A couple of years ago I replaced the standard lamps with ones rated at 6500K. That's close to true sunlight, not in lumens but in color temperature. It made the shop so much more inviting and even brighter, even though the lamp wattage is the same. It was a nice upgrade.

As for electrical power - as has already been suggested, there is no such thing as too many outlets. I have a double duplex every 4' in my shop. It's all in a paneled wall and connected by conduit (conduit is code here). The conduit has proven helpful as the power needs of the shop have changed over the years. I add or move a circuit as needed. With boxes every 4', I've never had the need to add another box, so it's just wire pulling. And if you surface mount your electrical, installing conduit is that much easier.

If you aren't going to have a remote controller for your dust collector, you may want to install switches throughout your shop to control the dust collector. I have 5 in my shop so I'm never more than a few steps away from turning it on or off. A ceiling mounted retractable extension cord can finish off your electrical system nicely.
Julie Mor is offline  
post #20 of 28 Old 05-08-2013, 08:51 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 217
View BrandonD's Photo Album My Photos
I'm thinking about the 3HP Grizzly DC and wanted to get an idea of whether it would fit in my shop. So I used the Grizzly shop planner that was linked to earlier and included tools that I don't have yet but would like to add slowly. The cabinets along the wall and the workbench haven't been built yet so those are up for moving around and modifications as well.

The shop is a garage, with the garage door being at the bottom of the picture. I'd have to open the door for putting sheet goods through the table saw but can do smaller cuts with the door down if it's raining.

Thoughts? Like I said, I'm new to this so not sure what I'm doing. Also I know that the layout will change as I grow as a woodworker. Just want to make sure I'm not doing anything incredibly stupid, like for instance if the band saw needs more room around it. Or if there's a way to put some tools closer to each other and still be able to use them effectively. Anything really.


Last edited by BrandonD; 05-08-2013 at 09:06 AM.
BrandonD is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Please help! Cut plan for Box Ta2edShady Design & Plans 0 08-03-2011 10:13 PM
Looking for a plan Richard brand Design & Plans 2 07-14-2011 04:09 AM
Help with plan boog711 Design & Plans 5 09-29-2010 09:05 PM
Toy Box Plan im4uth Design & Plans 9 08-19-2010 09:34 PM
need jig plan Rick Cichon Tips, Tricks, & Homemade Jigs 4 04-19-2008 03:52 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome