How do you keep your shop cool? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 44 Old 06-08-2009, 02:59 AM
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My shop and attic are well insulated I open the two 3' x 6' slider windows for cross ventelation if needed but always have the garage door open which is under my patio cover. I have two 30" pedestal fans which I have only used one for like 2 days and I have a never used window unit just in case. Even in the hottest part of the summer I think the temp in the shop never exceded like 85 except the 2 days I used the fan. It was like high 90's - low 100's on those days with no breeze.
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post #22 of 44 Old 06-08-2009, 03:23 PM
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MY method is in the roof framing detail

Here in Michigan we got hot summers and cold winters. I can deal with the shop being 55 degrees, but not 85 degrees. The shop is 725 sq ft and on the second floor, R19 in the walls and R38 in the ceilings. I'll admit I have a small window AC , used most summer days, 2 ceiling fans, used fequently, and a ceiling exhaust fan, rarely used. My house and shop has a roof framing detail with 2x4s running flat and parallel with the tops of the rafters providing a larger surface to sheet and a 1 1/2" deep flange on each rafter. This provides an AIR GAP continuous along the entire roof surface, so the air rising from the soffit can move upward and out the continous roof vent visible below. This method I believe was used in the building of ice storage buildings back when... and was called an ICE HOUSE roof.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cool_Roof
This was all I could find in quick net search. The 48" long 3/4" thick foam panels are foil covered with household aluminum foil applied with spray adhesive to reflect the radiant heat that penetrates the shingles and sheeting. They sell an aluminum foil paper
http://afs-foil.com/pages/faq.htm to acomplish the same thing, but it's a PITA to work with, hold, staple, stretch etc. I used that on the house, but then I used the foam and foil on the garage addition. BTW, applying the foil is also a PITA. The spray goes everywhere and the foil sticks to your fingers first, the foam second and it never lays down on the foam where you want it. bill
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-08-2009 at 07:31 PM.
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post #23 of 44 Old 06-08-2009, 03:27 PM
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"Here in Michigan we got hot summers and cold winters. I can deal with the shop being 55 degrees, but not 85 degrees"

I wish we could go back to 85* days here. It has been a cool spring and summer so far but we are starting to creep into the 90's, 100's not far behind.
I am going to try mounting a large exhaust fan in the gable end of the roof and up the insulation some.
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post #24 of 44 Old 06-08-2009, 07:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Here in Michigan we got hot summers and cold winters. I can deal with the shop being 55 degrees, but not 85 degrees.
Well Bill 85 degrees is very nice especially in the shade and a slight breeze. If it wasn't there wouldn't be so many people spending a small fortune to go to Hawaii where it is like 85 degrees 365 days a year. I was stationed there and noticed they dont need a weather man it's the same weather almost every day 85-86 with a afternoon shower. (It was nice but expensive)

Plus here in south Louisiana the heat index is like 100-120 every day in the summer. In Michigan you have a hot summer that last like a week, just like our cold winters here. I'm 42 and can probably say that I have twice as many Christmas days in shorts sweating then I had in cold or cool weather gear.
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post #25 of 44 Old 06-10-2009, 11:04 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the replies i think it may be too humid here for the swamp cooler to work effectively.... i remember my parent used one when i lived in a dryer area. i am thinking a couple pedistal fans may be my best option.... or just stop being a wuss
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post #26 of 44 Old 06-10-2009, 09:25 PM
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I have a new boat. When it gets too hot to work in
the shop, I go to the lake!

The insulation I put on the door to help keep it
warm, also keeps it cool when the sun shines on
the door.

I have a ceiling fan and a couple box fans.




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post #27 of 44 Old 06-11-2009, 07:14 AM
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Actually it all depends upon which side of the street that you live on.

In the winter I envy my neighbor across the street because he gets the nice warm sun and can work in the drive and the garage without freezing. (His house faces Southwest) Of course in the summer I am glad that the sun does not hit my drive nor garage directly.

G
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post #28 of 44 Old 06-11-2009, 09:05 AM
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I open the doors and hope the wind blows. It's actually not too bad because it is fairly well insulated. Of course, we don't get temperatures much above 80 up here, even in the hottest summers.

Gerry
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post #29 of 44 Old 06-11-2009, 09:28 PM
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how to keep your shop cool

I keep mine in the basement
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post #30 of 44 Old 07-06-2016, 02:56 PM
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For those that use a swamp cooler in their shop, are you concerned at all about moisture being introduced to your wood?
I live in Vegas and use a swamp cooler most of the time in the house. When the temps climb above 110, I close up the house and turn on the AC.
What I've noticed in the house is the doors have expanded a bit and they get a bit sticky once we start using the swamp cooler.
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post #31 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 02:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LVWood View Post
For those that use a swamp cooler in their shop, are you concerned at all about moisture being introduced to your wood?
I live in Vegas and use a swamp cooler most of the time in the house. When the temps climb above 110, I close up the house and turn on the AC.
What I've noticed in the house is the doors have expanded a bit and they get a bit sticky once we start using the swamp cooler.
I'm in the high desert and I use my swamp cooler all the time for 20 years now and I do not have any problem with excess moisture. I used to have a small separate portable unit in my shop with a 1/4" water line running inside and that was a problem.

Then I realized that since I have to allow the air to get out of the house anyway, I decided to install a screen door between the garage and the house to keep the animals out of the shop and I also have a security door on the side of my garage to allow the damp air to escape. I have to say that it keeps my shop nice and cool even when I open the large garage door.

As long as the air is moving to the outside, there is no concerns about rust. My dogs like to hang outside the garage security door where there is a constant flow of cool air.

If you are experiencing stickiness inside then you need to open up more widows.

JohnnyB
Iím a die hard DIY guy. Donít tell me to hire someone for what I can do myself.
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post #32 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 02:17 AM
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I just turn on my 4 ton AC to cool my shop.

I feel bad for you guys. I use to be just like you in the heat. I do woodworking for a living and for 9 years I dealt with the summer temps getting above 88F every day in the shop. On the 10th year I spent $3500 on my new system. Worth every penny.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
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post #33 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 08:01 AM
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Mini-split, one ton, high SEER, costs next to nothing to operate. Our shop is the attached two car garage, fully insulated, and the mini-split stays on 24/7. 100+ degree high humidity summer days in northwest Louisiana down to low 20's in the winter but this unit keeps the shop perfect for shorts year round. It's awesome, actually!

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post #34 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 09:39 AM
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Mine is a 16 SEER, what's your mini-split? And since mine operates off of a demand power system, it shows up in the power bill as a good charge. The actual electrical charge isn't that bad, the extra demand charge on top of everything else hurts. My demand charge is $18.50/KWh. They give you the firs 2 KWh and I usually use 8.5 so I pay for 6.5

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
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post #35 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 01:19 PM
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My shop is a block building with concrete floors.
Stays relatively cool in the summer.
I have a window AC unit that cools it down on hot days.Heat it with a woodstove.
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post #36 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo G View Post
Mine is a 16 SEER, what's your mini-split? And since mine operates off of a demand power system, it shows up in the power bill as a good charge. The actual electrical charge isn't that bad, the extra demand charge on top of everything else hurts. My demand charge is $18.50/KWh. They give you the firs 2 KWh and I usually use 8.5 so I pay for 6.5
22 SEER. We put it in October 2013 and it has run 24/7 ever since. I hate to say this after what you said yours costs but our electric bill never changed. We are on level monthly pay for electricity and except for a slight upcharge for costs/KWh we're paying the same now as we were nearly 3 years ago - about $7 more per month over when it was installed. And I honestly think that's due to me running several 3 HP tools in the shop a lot more than I used to.

We added 90% solar blocking screens to the four front windows of the house (West side) , put on solar blocking film, and insulated the garage - now our shop. I think the 440 sq. ft. of the garage now being the same temp as the house, and leaving the door open to the house most of the time, has reduced the load on the house central unit. It has been well worth it for us.

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post #37 of 44 Old 07-07-2016, 04:23 PM
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When I moved into my shop the electric bill was about $60/mo. Now it usually runs about $250-300/mo mostly due to the demand charges. I rarely would go above my 2KWh "freebie" in the early days. I've doubled the size of the shop and now I consistently go above the 2 KW/h threshold. So adding the 4-5 KW/h to my demand usually adds about $100/mo. Plus my service charge is about $45/mo just for the honor of them letting me have electricity in my shop. So now I usually pay about $80/mo for my electrical usage and the rest are fees, taxes and demand charges. Sucks.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
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post #38 of 44 Old 07-08-2016, 11:32 PM
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I have an insulated shop with a window air unit. It doesn't get chilly but it is comfortable even when the temps hit 100 at 80% humidity.

Tom Mayberry
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post #39 of 44 Old 07-08-2016, 11:56 PM
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If you put up with it long enough you get used to the heat. At my age though I can no longer take 100 degree heat in the direct sun however recently I went across the Mohave Desert when it was 108 degrees and it didn't feel half bad even in the direct sun. I think it was probably because the humidity was less than 10 percent.
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post #40 of 44 Old 07-09-2016, 09:25 AM
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My shop is in my basement so it always stays cool. Unfortunately I'm usually too busy to work in it all summer.
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