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post #1 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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How do I do this?

I am trying to cut two pieces of wood to fit together with joinery integral to the seam. For example, I want to cut a wave patten on the edge of one board, and then make a negative of that cut on another board, so they fit together perfectly without the need for extra joinery.

I can't use a router bit to do this easily, as the bit cuts the positive of the form with the inside radius of the bit, and the negative of the form with the outside radius resulting in different shapes.

I also cant get the perfect fit I need for a good glue joint by using a jig saw and a spindle sander. It looks perfect, but I can still see light through the seam in places.

I have also tried a template, router, and collar in an attempt to use a small collar and the outside radius of a bit to cut one side, and a large collar and the inside radius to cut the other. This works for smooth curves, but when the curve gets tight or comes to a point, I don't think this method will work anymore (although I have not tried it on anything other than a smooth curve).

Am I missing something, or is this just incredibly difficult to do?
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post #2 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 12:21 PM
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Use a glue joint bit, you run one pc up and the other down and then they match perfect.

http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops...e_joint_anchor

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
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post #3 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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Thats not quite the solution I'm looking for. The joint is long grain to long grain, so I am not concerned about connecting the pieces together in a mechanically sound fashion, I am looking for a solution to cut a mate for a dramatically curved piece of wood well enough to take advantage of the mechanical stability of the long grain glue joint.
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post #4 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iculus View Post
I am looking for a solution to cut a mate for a dramatically curved piece of wood well enough to take advantage of the mechanical stability of the long grain glue joint.
what about some double-sided tape...secure each of the blanks face to face. Overhang the pieces opposite each other---that is, the waste or off-cut stack together, and the 'save' or work pieces orient to each side (left and right). Then make your cut on a band saw or jig saw. Now, each piece is being made in the shadow of the other. The joint should align perfectly if you cut slowly and carefully.

let us know how it comes out.

smitty
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post #5 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 04:52 PM
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Smitty beat me to it. I was going to suggest that you stack cut the ends. Smitty was quicker on the draw.
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post #6 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
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I thank you guys for the input, but I still think there will be a problem. The jigsaw blade will remove a kerf width of material, and therefore the pieces will fit together loosely, like a jigsaw puzzle. What I am looking for is a snug fit ... like a dovetail joint, but in the same plane and with no hard angles.

My apologies if I am not describing this well.
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post #7 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 05:04 PM
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If you are concerned about a tight fit, there is always the option to cut them individually. Cut the first board in the pattern that you want and use it to mark out your cuts for the second board. Cut just outside the line and fine sand to the line to adjust the fit. A lot more work, but acheiveable, none the less.
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post #8 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 05:06 PM
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A scarf?


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post #9 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 05:23 PM
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You are right, they will not fit together exactly because of kerf loss.
Bill Hylton addressed this problem and provided a solution in a magazine article in 2006 or a little earlier.
He made a blanket chest with contrasting woods that had a wave pattern on the sides.
He brought the chest to one of our guild meetings (he's a member) and explained the problem and solution.
The magazine may have been Popular Woodworking, which he often writes for.
All this doesn't solve you problem.
Try goggling Pop WW and Bill Hylton.
We have a meeting coming up on Tue and I might see him then....if so, I'll ask how I can get a copy of the method.
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post #10 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 05:47 PM
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Talking

Here's my attempt at a solution.

Draw and cut the first curve. Trace that curve onto a hardboard pattern. Cut the hardboard to the line traced from the original from the appropriate side. Trim, sand, scrape until matched exactly to the original curve. Use the hardboard pattern and a router pattern bit to cut the matching piece.

Good luck!

Last edited by wingnut; 01-16-2009 at 05:52 PM.
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post #11 of 19 Old 01-17-2009, 05:57 PM
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here is the easiest and cheapest way out . make 2 templates and match them the best you can with sanding. So now put some clear tape on 1 template edge and apply a generous amount of bondo on the other. clamp the 2 pieces together and wait 15 min. take off tape and scrape or sand excess squeze out and you will have a perfect matching template every time...
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post #12 of 19 Old 01-17-2009, 06:25 PM
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i have had to do this with laminate before... i used MDF and just cut the squiggly line i wanted through the MDF with a jigsaw and both side fit together perfect with minimal sanding. the amount of material lost wont effect it unless your line is real crazy. i used a flush router bit with a bearing vs a coller it never seames to work well with a coller. the bondo idea sounds good too i may have to try it sometime
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post #13 of 19 Old 01-17-2009, 11:49 PM
 
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I am not sure what you are asking, but I think I have achieved what you are trying to do. I placed two pieces of wood, held with double sided tape, on my band saw and cut a wavy form. Then I took them apart and swapped the pieces, glued them and ended up with what you see in the picture.

Hope this helps.
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post #14 of 19 Old 01-18-2009, 08:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iculus View Post
The jigsaw blade will remove a kerf width of material, and therefore the pieces will fit together loosely
Iculus: any blade will remove a kerf. The whole idea of taping (or otherwise fastening) the two pieces together temporarily while you make the cut is that the cut is going to be a negative of itself on the second piece.

Anyone can follow a line and make a cut, but to be able to follow another, second line exactly like the first, with all your little hand twitches and what-not, is next to impossible free-hand. Hence, if you make both cuts at the same time, your cut will be a mirror image of itself, or a negative, and the pieces should align nearly perfectly. A little clamp and glue and you should be golden.

Ohio Ron's pic is a good example.

Or perhaps I'm missing the point entirely....Kenbo?

regards,
smitty
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post #15 of 19 Old 01-18-2009, 10:33 AM
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Smitty, you are missing something. On tight radius a gap will be seen representing the difference of the blade thickness. It may be close, but will be there.
Hylton uses template and router to eliminate the gap fit.
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post #16 of 19 Old 01-18-2009, 11:13 AM
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I would make a template of both profiles, and cut close with a bandsaw or jigsaw, and route to the template with the smallest bit I could. Then clean up the tight spots with a rasp / file.
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post #17 of 19 Old 01-19-2009, 03:31 PM Thread Starter
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WoodChuck - I think the bondo idea is brilliant. I am going to give it a try tonight and I'll let you all know how it goes.

Thanks for all of the input.
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post #18 of 19 Old 01-21-2009, 04:19 PM
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I spoke with Bill Hylton last night about the method he uses to match wood together as you are trying.
His article was in pop woodworking and one of his router books.
If you are interested, I'll try and dig it out, otherwise I won't bother. Let me know.
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post #19 of 19 Old 01-22-2009, 10:13 PM
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what if you were to cut it in the way you would do an inlay?Put the blade on a slight angle.

I don't plan my day in advance cause the word "Premeditated" ends up flying around the court room.......

Last edited by johnjf0622; 01-22-2009 at 10:19 PM.
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