how to deal with thickness planer snipe - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 11Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 23 Old 03-30-2020, 10:58 PM
Member
 
RickKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: NE Oregon
Posts: 99
View RickKr's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGi View Post
...snip...
I wish I knew how to turn photos.
I take all my photos with my iPhone. Then email them to myself and save them on my computer for editing, primarily cropping and resizing.

The only way I've found to have photos "turn" out the way I want them, as far as orientation is concerned, is to view them on my phone and if not oriented correctly, I rotate them on the phone. If I don't do this, I cannot get them rotated so they remain rotated once posted. They look good on my computer, but once posted, often they do not display with the correct orientation on the web sites.

Rick

"Quality is like buying oats. If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes a bit cheaper."
RickKr is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 23 Old 04-02-2020, 11:02 AM
Member
 
RickKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: NE Oregon
Posts: 99
View RickKr's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
That was exactly what I was gettin' at.
You said it!
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickKr View Post
It seems the key is:

"never letting the feed rollers go on or off of the wood during the planing of multiple pieces"

The result being "lead and trailing scraps will receive the snipe and the work piece will not"

I fail to understand the difference in "fiddly-ness between feeding "other" pieces butted or alongside with overlap between. In my case, the pieces were small enough (1"x1" or 5/16"x 1") that all I had to do was reach for another and feed it in - along side, well enough before the end of the last piece went in. Trying to butt those pieces would have been more fiddly, to me at least. Further, the overlap between adjacent pieces would ensure there is no momentary "dip" if the butted pieces were not perfectly butted.

What was fiddly was having pieces on both sides of the table at the same time and feeding other strips alongside each, so as to avoid the rollers "tipping", if that would even happen.

Rick
That was exactly what I was gettin' at.
I think this may be one of those "agree to disagree" things.

Taken in full context, I maintain that attempting to butt following pieces behind previous pieces is more fiddly than placing them adjacent and overlapping.

"Quality is like buying oats. If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes a bit cheaper."
RickKr is offline  
post #23 of 23 Old 04-02-2020, 03:27 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,614
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Yep, we do disagree!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RickKr View Post
I think this may be one of those "agree to disagree" things.

Taken in full context, I maintain that attempting to butt following pieces behind previous pieces is more fiddly than placing them adjacent and overlapping.

If, your workpieces will fit side by side/overlapping then of course that will work well. But, if they are too wide for that method then the "butt them end to end" method is the only alternative I know of. I use the side by side method when it's possible.


You could run separate strips along side your workpieces, and that was what I thought you meant in the post above. That to me would be "fiddly". I have probably misread your post above, I donno?

In my world/shop, the more pieces I have to feed into the planer other than the actual workpieces, the more "fiddly" it is to keep them feeding. With only the workpieces to feed end to end, it does require some concentration and organization at both ends of the planer.




The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome