How to cut these post details? - Page 3 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #41 of 68 Old 04-23-2019, 06:49 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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If you have a bandsaw ......

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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Using a bandsaw would be easier IF the pieces were a managable length, say 18" or less. A router would not be my choice. The separate pieces could be tenoned together or doweled with a reveal/parting line to conceal the joint.


Same topic started here before:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/h...st-caps-53814/
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhail2400 View Post
Just curious but if being able to manhandle the post is whats stopping you from cutting them on a bandsaw why not cut off say an 10" length to make the cap out of then dowel it back to the post with wood glue after its cut? Maybe someone else mentioned doing this above and I missed it but thats one way. Thank God I live in the country, I would be in prison if I lived in a HOA.

I posted the same idea in the 3RD reply way back when ......

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post #42 of 68 Old 04-23-2019, 09:14 PM
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Is there anyone else here besides me that has actually done something like this, the BS I am reading here would cause any company to go broke.

If the OP doesn't have a bandsaw then cutting them 18" long is not a solution, if he has then read post #15, BTDT several hundred times.

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post #43 of 68 Old 04-23-2019, 10:43 PM
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With 44 posts I'm surprised someone hasn't suggested getting a beaver to make them.
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post #44 of 68 Old 04-23-2019, 10:54 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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He does have a bandsaw......

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Originally Posted by southwow View Post
@woodnthings, don't make me want to buy more tools! My dinosaur craftsman bandsaw could make the cuts... I can see myself clamping the post to the outfeed table, leveling the floor, and rolling the saw around on casters... LOL!

Too bad the handheld portable metal bandsaws we use for conduit and pipe can't cut these curves. The capacity is there.
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Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Is there anyone else here besides me that has actually done something like this, the BS I am reading here would cause any company to go broke.

If the OP doesn't have a bandsaw then cutting them 18" long is not a solution, if he has then read post #15, BTDT several hundred times.

He has a bandsaw, just didn't chose to use it because of the "hassle involved" .... and ultimately did successfully use a jigsaw:
Quote:
Originally Posted by southwow
Mystery solved! My cheap bosch jigsaw with a bosch 9" blade cut right through a scrap of rough-cut 4x6 timber. It didn't drift more than 1/16th top to bottom. Ordered a roundnose bit from Home Depot, will update with photos of the process as soon as I have a chance to buy a real 6x6.



Why so testy Frank? Mystery solved! All this BS is us just havin' fun, after the fact.

No companies will go broke from reading this thread ... just sayin' And yes, I have had to make a outboard support for my bandsaw, in fact, I used my other identical bandsaw which is the same height, AND I still needed a helper to make the cut.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-23-2019 at 10:57 PM.
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post #45 of 68 Old 04-24-2019, 07:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
And yes, I have had to make a outboard support for my bandsaw
I was day dreaming about this. I'd have tried two things in no particular order.

Requires a fairly flat and smooth floor. Make a four wheel dolly that is as high as the bandsaw table, and stable enough for the 6x6. Place the dolly under the center of mass of the 6x6, strap it in place.

OR: Make an arc'ed rip fence. Make a very large right-hand side outfeed table out of 3/4" 4x8 sheet. Screw a length of 3/4 PVC to the out feed table, bending it into an arc. Place the 6x6 up on the outfeed table, with the top of the post near the bandsaw blade, and the bottom of the post out along the PVC fence. As the 6x6 is pushed through the bandsaw cut, the other end of the 6x6 is guided to the right, so the arc needs to be such that the correct curve is cut. To determine the arc, the first cut is made freehand. After every 1/2" of cut, the location of the bottom on the outfeed table is marked.

Or the outfeed or infeed table with the arc'ed rip fence could be on the floor and used to guide the dolly (after attaching to the dolly an outrigger that bears against the PVC fence.)
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post #46 of 68 Old 04-26-2019, 08:29 AM
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Try Fine Homebuilding Issue 56, November 1989
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post #47 of 68 Old 04-26-2019, 09:23 AM
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Right ......?

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Originally Posted by Bob Vaughan View Post
Try Fine Homebuilding Issue 56, November 1989

Yeah, "try" to find that issue.
For those of us who don't have it, what does it say to do?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #48 of 68 Old 04-27-2019, 12:24 AM
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A multi-spur bit with a jig on a drill press for the cove.
A band saw for the crowned top.
I used to make them for a local lumber yard.
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post #49 of 68 Old 04-27-2019, 09:45 AM
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This post is starting to get comical. The methods and ideas have been handed to him. I say just do it.

Gary
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post #50 of 68 Old 04-27-2019, 10:54 PM
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First, plane the posts so they are exactly square. Then set up a drill press with stops and support so you can use a Forstner bit of the desired diameter to drill the concave on all 4 sides, re-positioning the 6 X 6 to repeat this cut 4 times. Repeat as necessary for every post you will need. Then use a band saw and a support table to cut the arcs for the top end of each. Rough cut these 4 passes a little over size. Then build a jig for your largest router to use a long top bearing flush cut bit to finish cut the arcs with the bearing following the template. If you go with 6 X 6 You will likely have to make two jigs and cut each curve from opposite sides. A light sanding may then be needed to smooth where the ends of these opposite side router cuts not quite meet to smooth the surface between them.

Not counting time to build the jigs and fixtures you will likely spend about 1 hour per post. I hope you only need 2.

Charley
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post #51 of 68 Old 04-28-2019, 03:00 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Did you miss this post?

Post no. 30

Quote:
Originally Posted by southwow View Post
Mystery solved! My cheap bosch jigsaw with a bosch 9" blade cut right through a scrap of rough-cut 4x6 timber. It didn't drift more than 1/16th top to bottom. Ordered a roundnose bit from Home Depot, will update with photos of the process as soon as I have a chance to buy a real 6x6.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
First, plane the posts so they are exactly square. Then set up a drill press with stops and support so you can use a Forstner bit of the desired diameter to drill the concave on all 4 sides, re-positioning the 6 X 6 to repeat this cut 4 times. Repeat as necessary for every post you will need. Then use a band saw and a support table to cut the arcs for the top end of each. Rough cut these 4 passes a little over size. Then build a jig for your largest router to use a long top bearing flush cut bit to finish cut the arcs with the bearing following the template. If you go with 6 X 6 You will likely have to make two jigs and cut each curve from opposite sides. A light sanding may then be needed to smooth where the ends of these opposite side router cuts not quite meet to smooth the surface between them.

Not counting time to build the jigs and fixtures you will likely spend about 1 hour per post. I hope you only need 2.

Charley

By Jove, I think he's got it!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #52 of 68 Old 04-28-2019, 11:32 AM
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I did similar post tops about 20 years ago. It worked well back then, so it should work well again.

Charley
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post #53 of 68 Old 04-28-2019, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
I did similar post tops about 20 years ago. It worked well back then, so it should work well again.

Charley
Don't sweat it CharleyL, there are people here with way too much time on their hands so enjoy reinventing the wheel.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
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post #54 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 09:14 AM
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Reinventing the wheel ....

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Don't sweat it CharleyL, there are people here with way too much time on their hands so enjoy reinventing the wheel.

If Charley L want to reinvent the wheel, he's got my approval, not that he needs it, nor should anyone discourage him. As someone with "a lot of time on my hands" I often think about better ways to do things...... faster, easier, cheaper etc. I haven't tackled the wheel yet, but these guys have:



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

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post #55 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 11:39 AM
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As a point of clarity I did not say CharleyL was reinventing the wheel, he actually suggested the logical solution, unlike certain others.
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post #56 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 02:13 PM
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Good grief...

I think the op found a solution.
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post #57 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 04:09 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerrys View Post
Good grief...

I think the op found a solution.
Yup, he did :-P

However, this is all very entertaining.

I'm still waiting on the roundnose bit, must be on the slow boat from China. I cut the large radius on 3 posts, took about 2 hours to do 6 cuts (top and back of crossbar). I'd recommend the jigsaw method to anyone over trying to guide these through the bandsaw... unless your bandsaw has casters and you can use an outfeed or assembly table to clamp the work to like somebody else mentioned.
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post #58 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwow View Post
Yup, he did :-P

However, this is all very entertaining.

I'm still waiting on the roundnose bit, must be on the slow boat from China. I cut the large radius on 3 posts, took about 2 hours to do 6 cuts (top and back of crossbar). I'd recommend the jigsaw method to anyone over trying to guide these through the bandsaw... unless your bandsaw has casters and you can use an outfeed or assembly table to clamp the work to like somebody else mentioned.
I find the various methods suggested as useful and good reading. However I’m not much interested in reinventing the wheel and if I were I would search for a thread on that topic. It’s your thread so if you like it I’m good with that.
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post #59 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 05:17 PM
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This just don't make sense ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Don't sweat it CharleyL, there are people here with way too much time on their hands so enjoy reinventing the wheel.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
As a point of clarity I did not say CharleyL was reinventing the wheel, he actually suggested the logical solution, unlike certain others.

This last statement is not clearing up the first one:
Don't sweat it Charley L,
(This is a complete sentence and it stands alone)



there are too many people here with way too much time on their hands

(This statement also stands on it's own. Who do you mean, be specific. Quote the replies you are referring to.)



so enjoy reinventing the wheel.

(Refers back to CharleyL. not "too many people....")


Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
As a point of clarity I did not say CharleyL was reinventing the wheel, he actually suggested the logical solution, unlike certain others.
For clarity:

(Who and what did they say. Quote them.)


To be perfectly clear, the sentence should have read:
Don't sweat it CharleyL.
There are people here with way too much time on their hands who enjoy reinventing the wheel.


This internet stuff is difficult enough without proper sentence structure. I probably will NOT get any likes for this post ......






As for reinventing the wheel, those videos were great. JMO
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post #60 of 68 Old 04-29-2019, 06:07 PM
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Feel better now you got that off your chest. ��
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