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post #21 of 68 Old 04-19-2019, 07:02 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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He's pushing the feed rate ...

Here's the video:


It should work OK, but you will need to support the saw on 2 of the sides becauuse they will be rounded off. The solution is to tape the cut offs back on where they were to make the surface "flat" again to support the saw base.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #22 of 68 Old 04-19-2019, 08:00 PM
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Nobody has mentioned cove cuts on a table saw yet. I wonder whether cove cutting on a table saw is a viable solution for the notches?

It still leaves the pointed tops, which would probably be done on a bandsaw. That begs the question, "Why not do the notches on the bandsaw, too?" ... for which I have no good answer.
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post #23 of 68 Old 04-19-2019, 08:09 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Ever make a cove cut?

You need to angle the workpiece quite severely to get the cove and with a long length it would be very unmanageable.



https://youtu.be/vVlvwJelz9s?t=424

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post #24 of 68 Old 04-19-2019, 08:18 PM
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The angled intersection of a plane and a cylinder is an ellipse in the common sense, but also the geometric/mathematical sense, so any cove cut on a table saw is elliptical (unless of course fed at right angle to the blade). The eccentricity can be reduced by using a small diameter blade, which reduces the feed angle. I'm going to follow Steve's idea of hogging out the cove with graduated depth cuts on a skill saw, after which I plan to use a hole saw (details of making this work excluded). At the very, hogging with a skill saw would trivialize the usual issues when using a holesaw.
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post #25 of 68 Old 04-19-2019, 08:35 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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using a hole saw ......

A hole saw has a built in depth stop, the top of the saw base. It will only cut through about 2" of material,... then what? It also only works well on a level, uniform surface. Something that's all chopped up will redirect the saw all over the place. It want's to take small uniform bites of material away at a time, all the way around it's circumference.


The jigsaw and the long blade is the best solution so far... cheap and doable. I recommended separate pieces and using a bandsaw for the curves, because that's how I would do it, but it does require a bandsaw.....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #26 of 68 Old 04-20-2019, 11:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The jigsaw and the long blade is the best solution so far...
I can't see that working. Even if it is possible to cut a 2-3" diam half circle with one of those long blades (which I think is unlikely), the combination of tooth-set, blade-width and desired radius will lead the bottom end of the blade to drift, causing the cut to be conical, not cylindrical. Hopefully, for those who try the jigsaw approach, I'm wrong.

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A hole saw has a built in depth stop, the top of the saw base. It will only cut through about 2" of material,... then what?
1) mark the 6x6 stock
2) use the hole saw to a depth of 1" or whatever, 4 cuts, not 8
3) use the circ saw freehand to run a bunch of kerfs
4) break out the bulk of the fins
5) use the hole saw to finish up boring the full depth

Hogging out the waste means the center drill bit of the hole saw will not have any wood to cut into. Hence the preliminary starter holes in step 2. Then in step 5, the hole saw is constrained not by the center drill bit, but by partial-depth starter holes cut in step 2. The point of this method is to avoid having to extricate a broken off core plugs from inside the hole saw.



Last edited by unburled; 04-20-2019 at 11:20 AM.
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post #27 of 68 Old 04-20-2019, 11:40 AM
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This keyboard woodworking is certainly entertaining to read but somehow doing it in reality may be another matter. Believe it or not some of us have actually done this or similar and there is a good reason we suggest certain tools for the job.

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post #28 of 68 Old 04-20-2019, 12:44 PM
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I’m not a good enough woodworker to figure out the process I’m about to propose but thinking outside the box a little might there be a way to make this piece one side at a time then glue the four sides together to form the finial?
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post #29 of 68 Old 04-20-2019, 01:03 PM
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Methods for cutting post finial...

Hello Southwow,

I'm late to the conversation...Sorry about that, as you have probably already chosen a method that works for you?

If I have to cut many of them, and the project warrants it a...hand held band saw...(i.e. , Mafell, Oliver, Mikeska etc) is the fastest and most consistent method. This is more than likely outside the context of your project...

If I only have a few to cut, then I just use hand tools. Its pretty fast and actually faster and less cumbersome (if only cutting a few?) than "tooling up" to do it with power. I like direct and expedient woodworking with the simplest (often fastest?) methods. These often are traditional in nature, yet again outside (?perhaps?) the scope of what your wish to do?

The most common...go to...method that I know of, that is fast, and has decent results is to use a good jig saw and a long...new blade. Clean up with sanding method of choice. Most critical trick to this:

Good layout on all sides to be cut.

Clean single passing cutting technique.

Hot gluing (or other "tacking method") the scrap piece back on to work so reference surface for Jig Saw stays intact until final cut.

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post #30 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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Mystery solved! My cheap bosch jigsaw with a bosch 9" blade cut right through a scrap of rough-cut 4x6 timber. It didn't drift more than 1/16th top to bottom. Ordered a roundnose bit from Home Depot, will update with photos of the process as soon as I have a chance to buy a real 6x6.
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post #31 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 11:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwow View Post
Mystery solved! My cheap bosch jigsaw with a bosch 9" blade cut right through a scrap of rough-cut 4x6 timber. It didn't drift more than 1/16th top to bottom. Ordered a roundnose bit from Home Depot, will update with photos of the process as soon as I have a chance to buy a real 6x6.
If you are using a roundnose router bit just to be safe clamp a sacrificial board to the back of the 6x6 so it doesn't chip the edge as it exits.
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post #32 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 12:44 PM
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How about a coping saw and a rasp? The job would be done by the time you got all the machinery set up.
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post #33 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unburled View Post
I can't see that working. Even if it is possible to cut a 2-3" diam half circle with one of those long blades (which I think is unlikely), the combination of tooth-set, blade-width and desired radius will lead the bottom end of the blade to drift, causing the cut to be conical, not cylindrical. Hopefully, for those who try the jigsaw approach, I'm wrong.



1) mark the 6x6 stock
2) use the hole saw to a depth of 1" or whatever, 4 cuts, not 8
3) use the circ saw freehand to run a bunch of kerfs
4) break out the bulk of the fins
5) use the hole saw to finish up boring the full depth

Hogging out the waste means the center drill bit of the hole saw will not have any wood to cut into. Hence the preliminary starter holes in step 2. Then in step 5, the hole saw is constrained not by the center drill bit, but by partial-depth starter holes cut in step 2. The point of this method is to avoid having to extricate a broken off core plugs from inside the hole saw.


Using a hole saw without the pilot bit or in a situation where the pilot bit is not secure is a very dangerous practice which it would appear to be in this case as you would only be drilling half a hole as described.
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post #34 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 02:29 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Glad to hear your success ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by southwow View Post
Mystery solved! My cheap bosch jigsaw with a bosch 9" blade cut right through a scrap of rough-cut 4x6 timber. It didn't drift more than 1/16th top to bottom. Ordered a roundnose bit from Home Depot, will update with photos of the process as soon as I have a chance to buy a real 6x6.

There are 2 different size radius cuts on this post finial. The easy one for the jigsaw is the large radius end. The smaller radius is the cove cut, which may prove too tight for the blade width ..... but maybe not?


Let's assume a trial cut doesn't work, it's too small a radius. Then what? Suggestions have been ... multiple saw kerfs, breaking out the waste between them OR using a hole saw. The saw kerf method is sorta self explanatory. The hole saw requires a more depth explanation.

Knowing the depth limitation of the hole saw, I would recommend using a 1/4" pilot drill to all the way through to both sides. Then using the pilot bit in the hole saw, drilling to the maximum depth of the saw on both sides of the 6 X 6. The typical home owner hole saw would still not be sufficient for a 5 1/2" thick piece. Now what? You can use a saw with a deeper blade, an additional expense if you don't own one. I would attempt trying to break out the waste using a chisel until I could complete the cut.

There may be some hand work to smooth out the uncut/sawn waste, but without actually performing the identical operation, I'm only speculating based on my experience using a hole saw in a very deep application:
100 2127

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-22-2019 at 02:45 PM.
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post #35 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 02:35 PM
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Quote:
multiple saw kerfs or using a hole saw.

and/or

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post #36 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 02:50 PM
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Multiple saw kerfs and hole saw....

Quote:
Originally Posted by unburled View Post
and/or

Those were some of the suggestions other than the jigsaw, which I suggested and favored from the jump. The reason I stated above was about the small radius where the blade width was the limitation. BUT, kerfing could also be done with the jigsaw with good results. The photos did not show any cut marks, so maybe a bandsaw was used by a production shop ... who knows, who cares,.... problem solved!
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post #37 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 03:37 PM
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... who knows, who cares,....
Well, probably people who care. But before banking on that, I'd ask them.
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post #38 of 68 Old 04-22-2019, 08:59 PM
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I bought a bunch of posts like that a while ago. I asked the guy how them made them.

They have a big cutter, kind of like the cutterhead in a jointer - it rides on a guide. They plunge the cutter into the semi-circular part, then let it ride across the top, forming each edge of the pointy part.
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post #39 of 68 Old 04-23-2019, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
There are 2 different size radius cuts on this post finial. The easy one for the jigsaw is the large radius end. The smaller radius is the cove cut, which may prove too tight for the blade width ..... but maybe not?


Let's assume a trial cut doesn't work, it's too small a radius. Then what? Suggestions have been ... multiple saw kerfs, breaking out the waste between them OR using a hole saw. The saw kerf method is sorta self explanatory. The hole saw requires a more depth explanation.

Knowing the depth limitation of the hole saw, I would recommend using a 1/4" pilot drill to all the way through to both sides. Then using the pilot bit in the hole saw, drilling to the maximum depth of the saw on both sides of the 6 X 6. The typical home owner hole saw would still not be sufficient for a 5 1/2" thick piece. Now what? You can use a saw with a deeper blade, an additional expense if you don't own one. I would attempt trying to break out the waste using a chisel until I could complete the cut.

There may be some hand work to smooth out the uncut/sawn waste, but without actually performing the identical operation, I'm only speculating based on my experience using a hole saw in a very deep application:
100 2127
I ordered a 2" roundnose bit and have a 2.5 HP plunge router, no worries on the small cove (which is actually a semicircle and not an ellipse, so the tablesaw method would not work... plus, I value my limbs).

I'm literally going to clamp all of my work pieces together, lock the router down, use my plywood edge guide, and do them all at once, flip, repeat 3 more times. The hole saw method would work if you predrill all of the way through the piece, I've done that before with 4x4 posts.

I measured the post last night as well. it's actually 5" x 5" actual and not the 5.5" you'd expect from a 6x6. After listening to my wife make the typical joke about men always thinking things are bigger than they are, I swung by Menards and viola! They have pressure treated ground-contact rough-sawn 5x5 timbers right there in stock (like, more than 100). Looks like I'm in business!

If the bit comes in this week, I'll post up how I pulled it all off!

Thanks guys, you've been an unlimited source of out-of-the-box thinking!
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post #40 of 68 Old 04-23-2019, 06:05 PM
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Just curious but if being able to manhandle the post is whats stopping you from cutting them on a bandsaw why not cut off say an 10" length to make the cap out of then dowel it back to the post with wood glue after its cut? Maybe someone else mentioned doing this above and I missed it but thats one way. Thank God I live in the country, I would be in prison if I lived in a HOA.

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