How can I ID a used T'wolf blade? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 29 Old 05-28-2014, 10:53 AM
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blade tensioning methods

Of the various tensioning methods what do you think of:

A. The flutter method

B. The "pluck" the blade/audible method

C. The spring/washer indicator common to Deltas and others

D. The press over 1/4" method using a fingertip

E. The lever cam release devices

Your comments will be greatly appreciated.

I personally use the audible method as I am somewhat musically inclined, but not talented. I pluck blade on the side away from the guides to get the best results. It's probably a variation on the fingertip pressure method to some extent. I have used an electronic string tuner as a "test" to see what tone I found satisfactory, but I can't remember what that note was at the moment.
It would seem to me that a given tension would correspond to a specific musical tone regardless of the width or thickness of the blade, but I am not a physicist. Your thoughts?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #22 of 29 Old 05-28-2014, 11:48 AM
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I am much more mathematically inclined than musically. I have essentially no musical ability or ear for sounds.


That being said, I think you are correct when you say that the tone should be equivalent for any dimension of blade if it is tensioned to the same STRESS (psi), not necessarily the same static load (lbs).


I am also not a saw expert, but I should be pretty darned good with blade manufacturing, metallurgy, and the related engineering.


One very well proven technique in the carcass-splitting saws (used in primary meat production plants) is a torque-limiting adjustment knob.


This effectively ensures that all blades are tensioned to the same level when used on a saw. (The splitter saws can only accommodate a particular length and width of blade). The operator puts a blade on, then turns the knob until it slips at a pre-set torque. The blade cannot be over-tensioned, and as long as the knob is turned until the knob slips, it won't be under tensioned.


The Delta-style spring preload indicator looks like a valid system as well. Obviously, adjustments need to be made based on blade thickness, width, and tooth profile for this to be 100% accurate. I include tooth profile because the back-to-gullet distance is different for different tooth counts and profiles.


The lever-cam systems generally rely on spring deflection, so they should be consistent for a given blade geometry. (either always good or always bad).


The flutter and thumb-finger methods aren't as "mathematical" in my view. That doesn't mean that someone with good feel, vision, or ear tone can't use them very successfully, only that I prefer something based more on the mechanics of materials.


My 2 cents,


Steve.
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post #23 of 29 Old 05-28-2014, 12:13 PM Thread Starter
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The saw is a 14" Delta 28-276, with the spring/washer indicator, tension release lever. I flutter my T'wolf and spring/washer the others. I'm going to measure all my blades just out of curiosity. If I used the pluck/tone method I feel the tone would change with the varying distances between the wheels due to the varying lengths of the blades, as would the push/1/4"/method. On the other hand we have 4 fingers and a thumb. (Hopefully)
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.If a frog had wings, he wouldn't be bumping his arse on the ground when he jumped.

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Thanks Steve, I'll look into that.
Thanks wood. Many ways to skin a cat. (Try b flat minor)

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post #24 of 29 Old 05-28-2014, 04:18 PM Thread Starter
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Update on the procedure

I have 5 blades. I measured them. The smallest is 93-19/32" outside diameter. The largest is 93-25/32". =3/16" variable. I mic'd all the bodies. All were .0020". (The T'wolf is supposed to be .0025. Makes me wonder). I have cleaned all the blades, and microscopically viewed the cutting portions finding some differences, in shape mostly. One thing I noted was the difference in depth from the outside of the teeth to the bottom of the gullet.
...I have the grinder set up to sharpen/destroy my worst blade.
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The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
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post #25 of 29 Old 05-29-2014, 10:22 AM Thread Starter
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Error correction of last post..and I tried to sharpen a blade

First I must point out that I made errors in the decimal dimensions in my last post. .0020" should have been .020.
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I attempted to sharpen a blade as done in the video. First of all you must have extremely good visual acuity, manual dexterity, and hand-eye coordination, all of which I have less of than earlier in life.
The blade re-sawed 5" maple like it was cardboard, but it cupped badly. The T'wolf blade cut the same piece much slower, but at least it was straight.
Next I'll try a diamond file, just for shirts and giggles.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

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post #26 of 29 Old 05-29-2014, 12:35 PM
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Thanks for posting the feedback. I would think that the setup of the tool rest on the grinder would be critical for a proper grind, as well. If it's not square to the wheel (level), and right on the vertical centerline of the wheel, a bad cut might result.


Steve.
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post #27 of 29 Old 05-29-2014, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetmugg View Post
Thanks for posting the feedback. I would think that the setup of the tool rest on the grinder would be critical for a proper grind, as well. If it's not square to the wheel (level), and right on the vertical centerline of the wheel, a bad cut might result.


Steve.
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Even though I didn't want to, I set the grinder tool rest at 90* to the C/L of the wheel. I had it set at 27* for my lathe tools. After all the turmoil I put it back to 27*. No more band saw blade grinding for me.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

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post #28 of 29 Old 05-29-2014, 05:32 PM
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You should see the grinders that put the teeth in bandsaw blades to begin with. They are powerful machines.


We have one with a 75 HP motor, uses an 8" wide wheel that starts out about 20" in diameter, automatic CNC dresser, and has about 5,000 gallons of coolant constantly circulating in order to prevent grinding burns (among other reasons). Coolant is supplied at almost 300 psi and 150 gallons per minute.


It grinds the complete tooth profile into a stack of bandsaw stock (let's say about a 5/8" thick stack), 8 inches at a time (24 teeth at once for 3TPI stock), with a grinding cycle of less than 30 seconds.


Steve
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post #29 of 29 Old 05-30-2014, 06:58 AM Thread Starter
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I can see that grinder in my mind, now. Probably a little much for my purpose.
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I have learned it takes about $75 worth of labor to save a $20 blade.
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Anyway, the reason for this thread was to ID the Timberwolf blade. We've done that.
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Thanks folks.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

Dr. Durdy Olman, Phd. (BS)
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