How can I clean poly residuals from glass jar? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 29 Old 06-16-2014, 12:52 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardAcheson View Post
>>>> I'm not sure if I should dignify this post with a response.

What is your problem with my response? There is nothing derogatory or incorrect as far as I can tell.

I ran a cabinet/finishing shop for a number of years and taught wood working periodically over a period of time and I did not intend to ruffle anyone's feathers.
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I regret my poor terminology. I'm sure you were just trying to help.
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Your procedure will cost me more poly than I can afford. Every time you open a can of poly or tung oil you allow more oxygen into the can causing faster curing of the contents. I use about 1 or 2 ounces at a time, maybe every three days or so. At that rate a quart will be ruined in 30 days. It HAS happened.
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Polyurethane is vacuum sealed or purged at the mfg. site, and will remain fresh on the store shelf for a considerable time. The first time it is opened it starts to cure.
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I bring my quart home, open it, stir it on the DP for 5 minutes, pour 1 pint into a pint jar, vacuum seal it. Another 1/2 pint into another pint jar, vacuum seal it. The other 1/2 pint goes into my wide mouth 1/2 pint jar, (very handy size) and it gets purged every time after use.
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I use disposable brushes, no need to clean the brush or the container. No need for thinner.
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My original problem was caused by my neglecting to purge the 1/2 pint jar before putting it back on the shelf for a few days, causing it to gel and harden.
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The small amount I have left is vacuum sealed, fresh as day 1, when I opened it in January, six months ago.
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If you are finishing furniture, you may well go through a quart before it has a chance to cure/gel/harden.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

Dr. Durdy Olman, Phd. (BS)
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post #22 of 29 Old 06-16-2014, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul
Sodium Hydroxide is pretty sneaky. You can handle it, work with it with your bare hands because it doesn't burn. Then two or three days later your hands crack open and bleed. I hate getting it on my skin. It seems like you have to wash forever to get the stuff off.
That slimy feel you get when handling sodium hydroxide is your skin dissolving. That's why rubber gloves are recommended.
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post #23 of 29 Old 06-16-2014, 11:48 AM
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Back in college I was taking a chem lab first thing in the morning. Under perhaps some lingering influence of EtOH I was cleaning up after my experiment and had some left over acid to neutralize before it could be disposed of down the drain. I went to the disposal hood and grabbed the NaOH and began to pour it into my beaker. My brain stem tingled briefly... I'd grabbed a strong base to neutralize strong acid. Next thing on the tingling list was my hand holding a steaming hot beaker after an audible 'poof' while I watched some steaming salt water drip down the back of the hood wall. Luckly the TA had stepped out for a smoke so no one witnessed my lapse of judgement/training but me...

Anyhow, be careful with your lye and acetone and so on. I've used lye drain cleaner, and it is highly effective, but I'm not sure I'd use it regularly in a house I planned to live in a long time.
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post #24 of 29 Old 06-16-2014, 12:22 PM Thread Starter
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Always pour acid into the water. Never pour water into acid.
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All my caustic work is done outdoors.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

Dr. Durdy Olman, Phd. (BS)

Last edited by durdyolman; 06-16-2014 at 12:24 PM. Reason: Add note
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post #25 of 29 Old 06-16-2014, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by mdntrdr View Post
Methylene chloride.

Although, I would just get a new jar...
Perhaps it would be less harmful to the environment than the toxins used to clean it.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #26 of 29 Old 06-16-2014, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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Perhaps it would be less harmful to the environment than the toxins used to clean it.
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OK, Frank. Good thinking. Are you comparing cleaning my jar with solvents to the Smog over LA and China?
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Yeah, I know. Every little bit hurts.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

Dr. Durdy Olman, Phd. (BS)
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post #27 of 29 Old 06-20-2014, 02:04 PM
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Just what sort of glass jar is it that you are using? I (my wife, actually, but then she is my better half, if not better three-quarters..) buys pure-peanut peanut butter - which comes in nice little glass jars with nice screw-on lids. The grand-kids go through PB at an unbelievable rate, so I have lots of nice clean glass jars available almost all the time. I just have to pull them out of the recycling stream and pop them in the dish washer for one or two cycles to get all the residue out. Considering that the DW is otherwise chock-a-block full, the incremental cost to wash them is very close to zero, as is the acquisition cost. The result is that I seldom attempt to reuse a jar. I just pitch it into the recycle stream and grab another clean one.
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post #28 of 29 Old 06-20-2014, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by OldEd View Post
Just what sort of glass jar is it that you are using? I (my wife, actually, but then she is my better half, if not better three-quarters..) buys pure-peanut peanut butter - which comes in nice little glass jars with nice screw-on lids. The grand-kids go through PB at an unbelievable rate, so I have lots of nice clean glass jars available almost all the time. I just have to pull them out of the recycling stream and pop them in the dish washer for one or two cycles to get all the residue out. Considering that the DW is otherwise chock-a-block full, the incremental cost to wash them is very close to zero, as is the acquisition cost. The result is that I seldom attempt to reuse a jar. I just pitch it into the recycle stream and grab another clean one.
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Good thinking, Ed. If I were to use your idea, I would be using small baby food jars, IF I could purge them easily. I like the wide mouth mason jars cuz I can vacuum seal them, and the poly will last forever.

The worst thing you can do to a piece of wood is
....get blood on it.

Dr. Durdy Olman, Phd. (BS)
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post #29 of 29 Old 06-23-2014, 02:27 AM
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Yeah - I used baby food jars too - when we had a steady flow of baby-food jars going through the house... Now-a-days it's the kids who had the steady flow of bfj's, but even that has ended. We now have, as I indicated, PBJ's is abundance. I dread the day when the bfj's will return to the shopping lists - my kids will be in line ahead of me...
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