How to build it - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 02-26-2019, 03:21 AM Thread Starter
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How to build it

Hi,

Have just started getting into cabinetry and really want to build a specific piece. Does anyone know how something like the attached is built. I can build the shaker doors OK (and probably the top half of the unit) but just not sure about the bottom of it. It doesn't look like the standard box and face frame that I have seen. Are the sides built will really thick stock? Also are the shelves built with really thick stock?

Any advise would be really appreciated. I wanted to build my unit as a free standing unit and have it approx 200cm in width.

Thanks in advance.
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post #2 of 12 Old 02-26-2019, 03:26 AM Thread Starter
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post #3 of 12 Old 02-26-2019, 06:45 AM
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I've installed base units that looked like that. They were frameless cabinets set between columns. The columns were hollow, just built from mitered ply or mdf. You can build the uppers shelves the same way.

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post #4 of 12 Old 02-26-2019, 08:23 AM
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Start with the faceframe. The rest of it is just a box behind it. It has a shaker type doors which you could purchase a router bit set to do but the sets are a little expensive. If you don't think you would be making more doors the tongue and groove for the doors can be done with a dado set on a table saw. The doors are inset. If you haven't done inset doors before you might consider a design change for overlay doors. With inset doors they are under such tight tolerances it's likely to give you a lot of trouble making and installing them.

I would plan on installing the mirror from the front after it was installed. In the event the glass got broken you otherwise would have to tear the cabinet out to replace the glass. You could just make a simple frame in front of it to hold it in or if you didn't want the frame stick the mirror to the back with a little silicone.
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post #5 of 12 Old 02-26-2019, 08:56 AM
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I would make this in two pieces: The base and the upper. It will make it easier to move and easier to handle.
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post #6 of 12 Old 02-26-2019, 05:53 PM
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Is that lighting in a groove in the back bottom of the shelves? If it is you could use two thicknesses of plywood to achieve that. One thickness of plywood for the shelf and one thickness under the shelf just stopping short where the recess lighting can be inserted.

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post #7 of 12 Old 02-27-2019, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Start with the faceframe. The rest of it is just a box behind it. It has a shaker type doors which you could purchase a router bit set to do but the sets are a little expensive. If you don't think you would be making more doors the tongue and groove for the doors can be done with a dado set on a table saw. The doors are inset. If you haven't done inset doors before you might consider a design change for overlay doors. With inset doors they are under such tight tolerances it's likely to give you a lot of trouble making and installing them.

I would plan on installing the mirror from the front after it was installed. In the event the glass got broken you otherwise would have to tear the cabinet out to replace the glass. You could just make a simple frame in front of it to hold it in or if you didn't want the frame stick the mirror to the back with a little silicone.
Thanks Steve but what would the face frame look like. Looks like the frame is only on 2 sides ie no rails. Also looks like it's closed at the bottom of the frame on both sides.


T
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post #8 of 12 Old 02-27-2019, 02:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danrush View Post
I've installed base units that looked like that. They were frameless cabinets set between columns. The columns were hollow, just built from mitered ply or mdf. You can build the uppers shelves the same way.

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Thanks Dan. Would you build the lower top and the upper frame the same way.

Also what type of box construction did you use. Just wondering about making the right gap just above the doors.
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post #9 of 12 Old 02-27-2019, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by cormicar View Post
Thanks Steve but what would the face frame look like. Looks like the frame is only on 2 sides ie no rails. Also looks like it's closed at the bottom of the frame on both sides.


T
The upper section, the middle shelf appears to be recessed back a little so the face frame would be two stiles which run down to the counter and the top rail and the rail just above the TV.

The bottom section appears to have a faceframe recessed back where it has a top and bottom plus center stiles to separate the doors. Then it looks like there is another faceframe that is just a top rail and stiles to fit over the front to make inset doors.
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post #10 of 12 Old 02-27-2019, 08:13 PM
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Sorry not good pictures(or drawings) hope they make sense. Drawings or measurements not to scale.

I would consider the whole unit as two separate assemblies.

The three door section, a frameless cabinet with a 1" rail filler on top, 4" toe kick below.

All other parts built the same way as shelf detail; base columns, counter top, upper columns and shelves. Just assemble the two assemblies to get the finished unit.

You can see from the shelf detail the interior has a void for light wires, add a dado for the light track.

Again, sorry for the poor renderings. I'm a better installer than designer!

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post #11 of 12 Old 03-04-2019, 03:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danrush View Post
Sorry not good pictures(or drawings) hope they make sense. Drawings or measurements not to scale.

I would consider the whole unit as two separate assemblies.

The three door section, a frameless cabinet with a 1" rail filler on top, 4" toe kick below.

All other parts built the same way as shelf detail; base columns, counter top, upper columns and shelves. Just assemble the two assemblies to get the finished unit.

You can see from the shelf detail the interior has a void for light wires, add a dado for the light track.

Again, sorry for the poor renderings. I'm a better installer than designer!

Sent from my SM-J337V using Tapatalk
Thanks for the detailed pics Dan. I'm going to start the project this weekend. Just have one more question- is the counter a mitred cube. I should easily be able to do the sides and shelves as can get away with just mitring 3 sides ie no need for top,bottom and back side for the side columns.
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post #12 of 12 Old 03-04-2019, 04:33 PM
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Yes, I would miter the ends of the countertops. Once you're set up cutting the shelves, etc, it's not too much more for the ends of the counters. Lots of clamps and blue tape!! Good luck, looks like a fun project.

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