Help with stain/finish for pine wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 29 Old 12-12-2019, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
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Smile Help with stain/finish for pine wood

The guy who made this said he used pine wood on this tv stand. I want to avoid having it take on an orange tone but want to add some richness to the color of the wood. What have others used...brands of stain, oil, salve, etc...I tend to like the lighter colored more natural tones. I have seen special walnut by minwax look nice on some pieces, but then I see it again and it looks very gold. I always test on scrap wood, but it never seems to look the same on the actual piece! Any suggestions advice or pics would be great! Thanks!
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post #2 of 29 Old 12-12-2019, 10:00 PM
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Usually with pine I use Early American stain and some times Colonial Maple just my preference, but with pine I also use a prestain.
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post #3 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 01:12 AM
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imo... pine is pine and a beautiful wood at that
any attempt to stain pine unless it is a light stain ends up looking blotchy at best
i'm a polyurethane pine guy myself, obviously
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post #4 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 09:56 AM
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I'm with Ogre. That knotty pine will look really nice with nothing more than a few coats of brush-on polyurethane.

I don't think there's much you can do about wood darkening. My parents built a pine trestle table 30 years ago and polyurethaned it. It has darkened over time, and now has an orange-ish shade, but still looks good.

If you plan to stain, don't sand any finer than 220 grit. Blotchiness can be somewhat overcome by using a wood conditioner.
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post #5 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice. Doesn't polyurethane have a very strong odor and VOCs? What will it do to the shade of the wood? Do you have any pics? I had also thought about just using a salve, but not sure if that would do anything to deepen the tone of the wood. Wise Owl Brand Paint has a salve that's supposed to be very good. I was also wondering if I should clean with mineral spirits before staining or putting a finish on the wood?

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post #6 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RNrunner View Post
Thanks for the advice. Doesn't polyurethane have a very strong odor and VOCs? What will it do to the shade of the wood? Do you have any pics? I had also thought about just using a salve, but not sure if that would do anything to deepen the tone of the wood. Wise Owl Brand Paint has a salve that's supposed to be very good. I was also wondering if I should clean with mineral spirits before staining or putting a finish on the wood?
Sorry, no pics of my parent's table at this time. I've used brush-on poly from Minwax, and don't remember any particularly strong chemical odors. I do most of my finishing in well ventilated areas, e.g. my front or back porches.
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post #7 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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Do you clean with mineral spirits after sanding and before staining? I have a lot of sawdust from sanding and not sure if just using water will be enough.
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post #8 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your advice. Would you happen to have any pics where you've used it on pine wood? What other options would I have for a more natural look?
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post #9 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 01:46 PM
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i'm a fan of disposable foam or hf chip brushes to minimize cleanup
not the best pic, a quick computer table i helped a neighbor make, he'd never done any wood working
turned legs glued up from 2x4 studs i had laying around, rest was hd 1x4 we picked up cheap
minwax semi-gloss poly is what i keep around
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post #10 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 09:58 PM
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That appears to me to be standard Douglas Fir, in the pine family. If that is framing lumber, which is what it looks like in the picture, you will need to be careful about the moisture content. I would not use too hard a finish on it, something softer like spar varnish. If you are concerned about a yellow cast you can add a drop or two of green aniline dye. Green shifts a yellow cast to a brown cast.
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post #11 of 29 Old 12-13-2019, 11:21 PM
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Do you have a HVLP? If so I would use a mixure of 30% acetone, 30% clear acrylic and 30% color. Wont blotch because it wont penetrate the wood.

Other ways is useing a dewaxed shellac as a barrier coat then go over it with a w/b stain then top coat.

You can also get a w/b poly tinted to what ever you desire.
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post #12 of 29 Old 12-15-2019, 12:45 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the suggestions, but I'm very new at staining, refinishing etc...I didn't even know what an HLVP was...had to google! LOL. So, want to try to keep it somewhat simple if possible but still get a beautiful finish/color.
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post #13 of 29 Old 12-15-2019, 12:47 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the pic. I can't really see it too well but I am hoping to get a bit more richness or color. Not sure if an oil would bring out more depth in the color?
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post #14 of 29 Old 12-15-2019, 07:07 AM
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Wont a tac rag help. The stickiness picks up the fine sandings
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post #15 of 29 Old 12-15-2019, 10:45 AM
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Here's what I'd do, on my test piece first. If you don't have one, go to the hardware store and get one. Looks like what they sell as "hem/fir". First sand to 220. Vacuum the surface well then wipe with DA (denatured alcohol). Take a couple cups of Zinsser shellac (yellow can) and cut it 25% or so with DA. Ya just wanna thin it some. With a wide, cheap chip brush, evenly flood the surfaces with the thinned shellac. Let dry then sand, with a block, with 320. Not to aggressively, but you'll be removing the layer of shellac from the hardwood yet leaving it in the softwood. Wipe with DA and let dry. Now try what ever stain you'd like. If ya don't like the way it turned out, try another wash coat of shellac.
This is the reason I milk paint pine.
Good luck with your project.

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post #16 of 29 Old 12-16-2019, 01:17 AM Thread Starter
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I have some scrap pieces of wood that he had left over from other projects I'm guessing. I can post tomorrow. When you say you use milk paint, do you mean you use it as a stain? Do you have any pics of pine pieces you've refinished?
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post #17 of 29 Old 12-16-2019, 07:30 AM
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No, I mean I paint pine solid colors. Have never liked the look of stained pine. And yes, milk paint can be used as a color wash though I haven't tried it.

Blake
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post #18 of 29 Old 12-16-2019, 11:32 AM
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Pine is one wood that is very prone to blotching especially around knots. A sanding sealer (unwaxed shellac) prior to staining can help with that. When you experiment with scrap, be sure you're using a board with a knot. ;-)
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post #19 of 29 Old 12-16-2019, 12:28 PM Thread Starter
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Is that different than a prestain conditioner? How do you think Danish oil would look instead?
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post #20 of 29 Old 12-19-2019, 10:26 PM
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I've used the shellac thinned with denatured alcohol method as well a pre-stain conditioner in the past. They both work pretty well but wood color is very subjective and keep in mind that whatever you do today will look a little darker in a year or so. If you run out of scraps you still have the underside to play with. Another thought is that if you like a lighter tone you can get a light colored paste filler. I used one that is about as white as printer paper on some white oak recently before I varnished it. It fills the pores for a flatter (more finished look).

To each - his/her own. Just have fun with it.
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