Help with joining glass to wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 03:02 AM Thread Starter
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Help with joining glass to wood

Hello, I am a brand new member and am looking forward to becoming an active member.

I am working on a project and I seem to be a bit stumped.

The idea
A combined computer and drafting desk

Details
- L-shaped section at back and right is fixed to base, this is where my monitor mounts, mousepad are
- other rectangular section tilts for drafting
- light box inlayed in tilting section
- To avoid seams on the drafting surface, I have a glass top. The glass is tinted using black vinyl tint and cut to fit both sections. The glass directly above the light box is the only part not tinted (for obvious reasons).

My problem:
Keeping the glass from sliding off when tilting.
I was trying to make it appear as seemless as posible, so I didn't want bulky brackets holding the glass on. I looked at a few places online (including a thread from a few years ago on here) and asked some friends for ideas in joining glass to wood. Silicone seemed to be the main suggestion. It seemed easy, so I tried it. I asked the guy at the tinting shop if it would be ok to use silicone on tinted glass. He said it would be fine, the vinyl has a silicon protective coating on it, anyways.

He was wrong. Places where the silicon were applied seem to make the vinyl bubble. It looks brutal. I will likely have to get the glass re-tinted (hopefully not re-cut) due to damage to it.

I thought I would start a new thread because I think it's a bit different than other joining glass to wood threads since it needs to tilt (so I don't think rubber discs will work) and vinyl tint is involved.

Here is a picture of earlier in the creation process (before the silicon incident, excuse the fingerprints). Does anyone have any ideas for me?

Thanks in advance!

Daniloff
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post #2 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 07:06 AM
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Your picture just looks like a black top with a white square. No indication of how large the glass is or its thickness. As a general suggestion, use glass large (or tall enough) to reach the bottom edge of the table. Make a pencil stop along the bottom edge. All you need is an edge high enough to stop the glass.










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post #3 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 07:13 AM Thread Starter
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It is 6 mil tempered glass. 18"x36"

The majority of the time, this will be used as a computer desk. So a pencil stop does not really make sense as it would dig into my forearms when typing.
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 07:14 AM
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I think that a bead of silicone seal around the edge would also work.

George
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post #5 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniloff View Post
It is 6 mil tempered glass. 18"x36"

The majority of the time, this will be used as a computer desk. So a pencil stop does not really make sense as it would dig into my forearms when typing.

One of my drafting tables is 36"x80" covered with Borco. On one side is the computer CPU and monitor. The drafting surface also doubles with my keyboard when not being used to draw on. I have a pencil stop 1/4" high that doesn't dig into my forearms when typing, or in the way at all. In fact, it even keeps pencils and templates from sliding off the table.






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post #6 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 08:43 AM
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Pencil stop that is the thickness of the glass when done and can be raised to be used as a pencil stop before tilting could work. I had this on an old drafting table for the same reason. Sorry it's long gone or I'd send a picture. The stop had two L shaped holes set at and angle to raise and lower.
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post #7 of 10 Old 02-10-2013, 08:59 AM
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With the design you have I would use mirror mounting clips. I have a piece of glass mounted in a frame in a drafting table so it is back lit. The frame has a rabbet around the parameter and the glass is held in with silicone. I think if it had solid wood underneath the silicone would show a ugly line around the edges.
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post #8 of 10 Old 02-11-2013, 02:16 PM
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How about a pencil stop at the bottom of the glass, the same thickness as the glass, made with wood, rounded edge, then sprayed with a gloss black lacquer paint to mimic the tinted glass?
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post #9 of 10 Old 02-11-2013, 04:32 PM
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I vote for mirror mounting clips.
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post #10 of 10 Old 02-11-2013, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniloff View Post
Hello, I am a brand new member and am looking forward to becoming an active member.

I am working on a project and I seem to be a bit stumped.

The idea
A combined computer and drafting desk

Details
- L-shaped section at back and right is fixed to base, this is where my monitor mounts, mousepad are
- other rectangular section tilts for drafting
- light box inlayed in tilting section
- To avoid seams on the drafting surface, I have a glass top. The glass is tinted using black vinyl tint and cut to fit both sections. The glass directly above the light box is the only part not tinted (for obvious reasons).

My problem:
Keeping the glass from sliding off when tilting.
I was trying to make it appear as seemless as posible, so I didn't want bulky brackets holding the glass on. I looked at a few places online (including a thread from a few years ago on here) and asked some friends for ideas in joining glass to wood. Silicone seemed to be the main suggestion. It seemed easy, so I tried it. I asked the guy at the tinting shop if it would be ok to use silicone on tinted glass. He said it would be fine, the vinyl has a silicon protective coating on it, anyways.

He was wrong. Places where the silicon were applied seem to make the vinyl bubble. It looks brutal. I will likely have to get the glass re-tinted (hopefully not re-cut) due to damage to it.

I thought I would start a new thread because I think it's a bit different than other joining glass to wood threads since it needs to tilt (so I don't think rubber discs will work) and vinyl tint is involved.

Here is a picture of earlier in the creation process (before the silicon incident, excuse the fingerprints). Does anyone have any ideas for me?

Thanks in advance!

Daniloff

Dan
I recommend not using standard Silicone. Try the Warner Crivellaro web site. WWW.Warner-criv.com It's a solid firm you can trust. They have a better type of sealant that won't allow moister build up (inside fogging) & will hold your glass in place. I have used it in the past.( I recommend using the black)
I wish I could remember The name of the product but ......

Learning to fix your mistake's is very time consuming

Last edited by Glassnwood; 02-11-2013 at 07:56 PM. Reason: sp.
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