Help identifying what?s going on here?!?! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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Help identifying what?s going on here?!?!

Hello, I was up in my attic crawl space of nun new home. Used to have a clay tile roof but was damaged by tree fall years ago. Other than a couple of fixed leaks by a chimney, roof isn?t sound and dry. I noticed one corner joist is a little hollowed out with petrified wood inside. See photo. No other damage, wood shavings or dust noticed. Did not see any evidence of termites or other pests. All other roof timber is fine. Look at the photos - I placed my finger inside and the wood is dry and hard and feels petrified?just a bit hollowed out. Any ideas? Thanks! Pete
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post #2 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 12:22 PM
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Looks like dry rot.
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post #3 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 12:23 PM Thread Starter
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Any ideas how to fix? Wood filler perhaps?
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post #4 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 12:59 PM
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Replace the rot wood.
Wood filler will not do anything, and that rot will have reduced rhe strenght of the material.
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post #5 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 01:06 PM
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My experience with dry rot is once it starts it can’t be stopped short of complete removal. I know there are products out there that claim to stop it. I’m a bit skeptical. Bigger issue is finding and solving the cause. In an attic space it is usually a result of what i know as hot roof caused by a lack of ventilation. An attic space must be properly ventilated to prevent issues like dry rot. There has to be a certain amount of air flow through the space. This flow is created by vents in the eaves or lower portion of the space and vents along the ridge of the roof.
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post #6 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 02:15 PM
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You can't patch it. Since it's just framing slide another joist up next to it. Sometimes this involves cutting a hole in the ceiling but it does need new wood there.
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post #7 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 04:40 PM Thread Starter
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This problem is confined to one joist in the corner where there are two joists nailed together. Not sure when it happened but there was a clay tile roof on from 1908-2012, when it was replaced due to tree damage. Entire house facade is solid stone and all other rafters seem fine. I do know there we?re trouble spots with the old roof but now it seems dry in the attic space, albeit very hot in the summer.

I did find some ivy vines in the attic and took me a while to kill the 70 year old roots. Now time to look for a reinforcing beam. Thanks.
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post #8 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 06:52 PM
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Just part of being a home owner. There is always something.
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post #9 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 08:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Just part of being a home owner. There is always something.
Tell me about it!

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #10 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 08:15 PM
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PeterMack this APPEARS to be a old damage BUT that is hard to identify without actually looking at...........NOW my opinion as a TN lisc GC is IF this is old AND you don't see or notice any roof deformity around IT should be fine left alone... according to your statements the roof was replaced a few years back and IF this was from a prior leak than it's most likely stopped. FROM the location I understand you described it's not a high pressured joist/rafter.

JUST my opinion.....I don't recommend repair/ replace unless it's a danger or safety issue and I don't see either.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
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post #11 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 11:09 PM
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If it aint fixed don't broke it man! The Dyslexic version is funnier! Just say it!

"Error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it"


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post #12 of 18 Old 11-19-2017, 11:12 PM
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Sometimes if you wait until something breaks completely you end up with a much bigger repair job.
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post #13 of 18 Old 11-20-2017, 01:00 AM
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Unless you're prepared to replace the whole beam, I wouldn't go cutting into it. In a house that old it could become a nightmare in a hot minute.
It sounds like someone applied Wood Hardener to it, at some point. "precisely for the reasons stated above".


I would fill it, and patch it.


Put a piece of Plywood over it with quick setting glue, so you don't cause more damage. Make it 3" bigger then the hole to be filled on all four sides. Seal the top, bottom and sides of the plywood. Drill a 1" hole above the patch board at an angle into the void to be filled. Get a long stemmed funnel that will go into the hole. Fill the void with one cup of two part epoxy mix. Stop after one cup, let dry for 24hrs. That will let the epoxy soak in and fill any possible leak points at the bottom of the void. Come back and top off the hole until filled. The patched area will be stronger then all the wood around it, and it will be completely bonded together.
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Last edited by Cowboy18; 11-20-2017 at 01:06 AM.
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post #14 of 18 Old 11-20-2017, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the advice. I?ll try filling it. The joist is in a corner where it?s doubled. No roof deformity. Unfortunately the previous owners who lived there 60 years thought it was a great idea to plant ivy on the stone. It grew all over the house and up through the clay tile roof into the attic.

I?ll try the patching with epoxy. I poked my finger around inside and it feels hard but definitely hollowed out.

Heres the house and the rafter in question would be on the top leftmost valley.
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post #15 of 18 Old 11-20-2017, 10:12 AM
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It looks like the roof has a ridge vent. If so I would assume there are also some type of soffit vents. These would eliminate the conditions that may have helped cause the rot in the first place.
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post #16 of 18 Old 11-20-2017, 12:39 PM
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Beautiful house.
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post #17 of 18 Old 11-20-2017, 07:48 PM
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Nice looking place, just as I suspected not one a fella wants to screw up. I handle a job like that like a Doctor would, "first" I do no harm.
If you break a board with your foot in such a way for the break to be jagged. Separate them by a couple inches. Then wrap cardboard around the break in a U shape nice and tight. Staple the edges on both sides near the break. Then pour epoxy into the void between the boards you can recreate what you are doing in the addict for you're customer.
You will be impressed with the strength.

"Error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it"


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post #18 of 18 Old 11-21-2017, 12:55 AM
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Beautiful house!!!! IVY......I've seen it destroy a house JUST by holding moisture in the mass...and the roots/runners destroy so much.

Have a Blessed and Prosperous day in Jesus's Awesome Love, Tim
........www.TSMFarms.com.......... John 3:16-21 ..........
Reveling God's awesome beauty while creating one of-a-kind flitches and heirlooms.
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