Help ID a Screw for me? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 08:16 AM Thread Starter
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Help ID a Screw for me?

My wife recently refinished her grandmother's china cabinet. No idea of age, so would like to get a guesstimate of date. While disassembling / removing the doors and hinges prior to refinishing, this was the type of screw that was used to attach the door hinges. (VERY difficult to remove BTW).

I've never seen a screw like this so was thinking it might help me determine a time period for the cabinet. (My hunch is it's not very old or overly valuable- sentimental more than anything).

Has anyone ever seen a screw like this? Does it have a name? Is it associated with a particular era or timeframe?
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post #2 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 08:30 AM
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These are close:
https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/...6x58box50.aspx


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-29-2017 at 08:36 AM.
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post #3 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 08:35 AM Thread Starter
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This thing is weird- almost like a screw shank nail. It's got a regular slotted head- so I assume it predates modern driver technology (philips, posi, etc) I've searched all over and can't find anything on the net anywhere. Weird. I couldn't find any markings of manufacture on the cabinet. So I wonder it maybe it's imported or something. But if it's imported, I would think it to be a more modern cabinet.

A reverse image search on Google brings up some more modern screws and other items, but nothing like this. . . .
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post #4 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 09:53 AM
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It is a twist shank nail. They just put the screwdriver slot on it to make it look like a screw. They are not really reusable in the same hole. Since they have been removed I would go back with screws when the cabinet is re-assembled.
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post #5 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wmshay6 View Post
This thing is weird- almost like a screw shank nail. It's got a regular slotted head- so I assume it predates modern driver technology (philips, posi, etc) I've searched all over and can't find anything on the net anywhere. Weird. I couldn't find any markings of manufacture on the cabinet. So I wonder it maybe it's imported or something. But if it's imported, I would think it to be a more modern cabinet.

A reverse image search on Google brings up some more modern screws and other items, but nothing like this. . . .
Do not make wild assumptions like phillips being modern modern technology. Phillips has been around longer than you have and Torx is 50 years old. Reed and Prince was before that.

Pozidriv is over 50 years old.

The think that has driven the change is not that technology took a sudden jump is that the people took a time to adad to change. I

Items are still produced with Slot Head screws.

George
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post #6 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 10:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It is a twist shank nail. They just put the screwdriver slot on it to make it look like a screw. They are not really reusable in the same hole. Since they have been removed I would go back with screws when the cabinet is re-assembled.
Correct. The key to this is the configuration of the end of the nail. Notice that the threads do not go all the way to the end.

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post #7 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 04:29 PM
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I think you would have to have a good pilot hole (slightly smaller than the shank) for this nail or it would split the wood. Ive never seen anything like it before.

Any type of deformed shank will outhold a slick nail.
*screw shank
*ring shank
*acid etched
Coatings can also add holding power (withdrawal strength)
*concrete coated
*polymer coated
*hot dipped galvanization

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #8 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 04:54 PM
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drive screws

These drive screws have no slot and are round headed. They are meant to be hammered into the joining parts. They have a high helix angle and are similar to the screw you posted in that regard:
https://www.rivetsonline.com/drive-screws


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 06:19 PM
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Looks like a spiral nail...dont think I've ever seen a screw like that.
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post #10 of 14 Old 11-29-2017, 10:11 PM
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The carpenter at work says wood screws are meant to drive in with a hammer. The slot is there to remove it.
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post #11 of 14 Old 11-30-2017, 06:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tewitt1949 View Post
The carpenter at work says wood screws are meant to drive in with a hammer. The slot is there to remove it.
I hope that he is not making that a blanket statement about all wood screws. If so I would not want to hire him as a carpenter.

George
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post #12 of 14 Old 11-30-2017, 09:19 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everybody. So it appears that this is a nail that is meant to be driven in (probably pneumatically?) to a pre-drilled pilot hole. Like I said, a real bear to remove.

I did not re-use them, I replaced with #8 brass screws when I reinstalled the hinges. Largely because I chewed these up pretty badly getting them out. Like I also said, I don't think the piece is extraordinarily old or of great value- sentimental more than anything. Could find no manufacturer markings or stamps on it, so I am figuring probably a mass produced department store piece.

Thanks again.
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post #13 of 14 Old 11-30-2017, 09:35 AM
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The nails were never driven in pneumatically. Think older than pneumatic tools. In a factory in that era they were installing hinges and hardware with screws using a blade screw driver. It was time consuming so they came up with those nails a person could just hammer in and be done with it. It was just a labor savings item. The first time I encountered those nails was when I had a antique repair shop. I kept trying to unscrew the nails and they either wouldn't turn or would just spin. I finally got frustrated enough to pry them off. Then when I was ready to put the furniture back together the nails wouldn't hold so I used screws to re-install the hardware.
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post #14 of 14 Old 11-30-2017, 12:04 PM
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I was surprised when I dismantled my Dad's bureau to find it was made from margarine boxes simply nailed together. It was veneered and the veneer hid a multitude of sins!
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