Help with gluing boards - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 12:39 PM Thread Starter
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Help with gluing boards

I am new to woodworking. I would like to make a storage box for practice for the big stuff that I hope to make later. I sketched up some plans. My idea is to glue together 2 5 7/8 poplar boards, creating a width of 11 1/8, then cut my pieces accordingly and assemble with wood glue, mitering all corners. I have a couple questions, however. will this work with glue with me mitering the sides and gluing together, or do I need some dowels (which I'm not up to yet, and don't know how to do, lol)?

Also, when gluing my boards together, is there a type of clamp that will keep them straight? I don't have a planer or jointer. I will just have to sand them so I would like to keep that to a minimum.

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post #2 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
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I am attempting to add a picture.
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post #3 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 01:16 PM
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What type of way equipment do you have? Mitered corners are not very strong in this configuration. There are several other type of joinery that you could use that would be far stronger. Your mitered joints could be strengthened with a simple spline running the length. I am sure you will receive some good ideas from the people here.
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post #4 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 01:19 PM Thread Starter
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I have a table saw, compound sliding miter saw and a couple of drills. Lol!!! I wanted to miter it be use of the practice it will give me. Ultimately I would like to build my bathroom vanity and my plans include massive legs that would require mothering because I can't find 5-6 inch square wood.


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post #5 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 03:21 PM
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A well cut miter, glued with a good carpenter's glue is stronger than you might think.
It will be fine for non-stressed items like your little box.
I suggest you use a band clamp to clamp your new project.
We have Harbor Freight in my area and they sell a good band clamp.
Welcome to our forum and Good luck to you.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you Toolman. There will be no stress. It's gonna hold TP in the bathroom. Thanks for the input.


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post #7 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 10:06 PM
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Welcome to WWT

Good for you to attempt new skills. Mitering accurately is like level 2 in woodworking, some may say even higher, but it ain't you basic cut. You'll notice I said accurately.

Here's why it's not so easy. First you would set your miter saw or table saw over to 45 degrees. The miter saw has a limited width of cut, so more than likely for your project you will use the table saw.

Next the miter gauge must be dead on at 90 degrees to the miter slot. A quick test it to slide it out until there is a tiny gap of open space between the gauge and the table top. If the gap is parallel, you're all set.

Next, the blade must be dead on at 45 degrees so use a draftsman's triangle or a digital angle box to get that. If it's not 45* exactly, the joints will show gap either on the outside or the inside where they meet.

Next, in order to get the piece equal length, you'll need a stop to bump them against to make multiple cuts of the same length. Clamps a block on the table top or spaced out AWAY from the fence by at least 1 ". to allow room for the piece to fall away. DO NOT use the fence in combination with the miter gauge. Use one or the other.
(OK, I have done it many times, but my machines are set up accurately and I know what I am doing after 50 years of tablesaw operation)
What I do is have a long fence extension on my miter gauge so it pushes both the workpiece and thew cutoff at the same time. It also is long enough to clamp a stop block right on the fence.

Never reach around or over a spinning saw blade. Shut the saw off and wait for the blade to stop completely before moving anything near the blade.



Next, select your table saw blade for crosscutting, either 40 teeth or more. Rip all your pieces to the desired width before making any crosscuts.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 17 Old 07-16-2016, 10:51 PM
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ThIs is a personal preference but any time I can cut a miter on my miter saw I use it rather than a table saw. Most miter saws have a clamping system to hold the board, on a table saw unless you are using a sled you are moving the board into the saw blade and there is a chance it will move as you push it forward. Most sliders will cut a 11 1/8" wide board.

There are two important factors to cutting miters, accurate 45 degree cuts and the opposite sides must be exactly the same length.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #9 of 17 Old 07-17-2016, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Good for you to attempt new skills. Mitering accurately is like level 2 in woodworking, some may say even higher, but it ain't you basic cut. You'll notice I said accurately.

Here's why it's not so easy. First you would set your miter saw or table saw over to 45 degrees. The miter saw has a limited width of cut, so more than likely for your project you will use the table saw.

Next the miter gauge must be dead on at 90 degrees to the miter slot. A quick test it to slide it out until there is a tiny gap of open space between the gauge and the table top. If the gap is parallel, you're all set.

Next, the blade must be dead on at 45 degrees so use a draftsman's triangle or a digital angle box to get that. If it's not 45* exactly, the joints will show gap either on the outside or the inside where they meet.

Next, in order to get the piece equal length, you'll need a stop to bump them against to make multiple cuts of the same length. Clamps a block on the table top or spaced out AWAY from the fence by at least 1 ". to allow room for the piece to fall away. DO NOT use the fence in combination with the miter gauge. Use one or the other.
(OK, I have done it many times, but my machines are set up accurately and I know what I am doing after 50 years of tablesaw operation)
What I do is have a long fence extension on my miter gauge so it pushes both the workpiece and thew cutoff at the same time. It also is long enough to clamp a stop block right on the fence.

Never reach around or over a spinning saw blade. Shut the saw off and wait for the blade to stop completely before moving anything near the blade.



Next, select your table saw blade for crosscutting, either 40 teeth or more. Rip all your pieces to the desired width before making any crosscuts.

Thank you Woodnthings for your awesome tips. Gonna test it out and see how it works out. Had to spend my Sunday cleaning up my garage/woodshop lol so I didn't get a chance to get much woodworking done today. But Im all set now and ready to build my little box

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post #10 of 17 Old 07-17-2016, 09:33 PM
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You might want to try your hand at box joints. They're probably stronger and much easier to get right the first time.
I made this planter box with box joints.. Pretty simple and strong..

It's now full of dead flowers..
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I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #11 of 17 Old 07-17-2016, 09:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
ThIs is a personal preference but any time I can cut a miter on my miter saw I use it rather than a table saw. Most miter saws have a clamping system to hold the board, on a table saw unless you are using a sled you are moving the board into the saw blade and there is a chance it will move as you push it forward. Most sliders will cut a 11 1/8" wide board.

There are two important factors to cutting miters, accurate 45 degree cuts and the opposite sides must be exactly the same length.
I will have to check to see how big of a cut i can do with my miter saw. Its a 10" so I'm not sure. I am in practice mode so either one I use is fine. I am trying to use my table saw a little more tho because its still a little intimidating to me. I want to be able to use it with ease as I do the miter saw and I think practice is the only way I will get there.

Thanks for your tips. :smile3:

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post #12 of 17 Old 07-17-2016, 09:43 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by allpurpose View Post
You might want to try your hand at box joints. They're probably stronger and much easier to get right the first time.
I made this planter box with box joints.. Pretty simple and strong..

It's now full of dead flowers..
Wow, Allpurpose that looks awesome! How'd you make the cuts?

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post #13 of 17 Old 07-18-2016, 12:45 AM
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As usual - great advise from Woodnthings and Frank (they are both an asset to this forum). Allpurpose is also correct!

Now you need to decide which joinery suits you best. I'm commenting in the event you hold your original joinery plan, the miter cut (although the box joint is stronger). When gluing simple miter joints for picture frames (no stress involved), I use the sizing or primer gluing method. It's like prime painting a board before painting or sizing a wall before wallpapering it. It will make your miter joint stronger then just gluing it.

Simple procedure... Squeeze out some glue and dilute it with water at a 50/50 solution. Apply this mixture to both ends of each miter joint and allow it to get tacky or sticky (not wet or dry). It should take more then a minute and less then 2. Apply your glue at full strength and clamp your project allowing the normal 24 hrs before use.

Welcome to the site and move forward while being safe... keep asking questions and keep challenging yourself!

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #14 of 17 Old 07-18-2016, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BernieL View Post
As usual - great advise from Woodnthings and Frank (they are both an asset to this forum). Allpurpose is also correct!

Now you need to decide which joinery suits you best. I'm commenting in the event you hold your original joinery plan, the miter cut (although the box joint is stronger). When gluing simple miter joints for picture frames (no stress involved), I use the sizing or primer gluing method. It's like prime painting a board before painting or sizing a wall before wallpapering it. It will make your miter joint stronger then just gluing it.

Simple procedure... Squeeze out some glue and dilute it with water at a 50/50 solution. Apply this mixture to both ends of each miter joint and allow it to get tacky or sticky (not wet or dry). It should take more then a minute and less then 2. Apply your glue at full strength and clamp your project allowing the normal 24 hrs before use.

Welcome to the site and move forward while being safe... keep asking questions and keep challenging yourself!
Yes, BernieL, they sure are! In my stalking stage, I've read several post to others like myself and although advise was advanced for me, I will surely take heed when I get to that level.

I intend to stick with my original plan to miter the corners. One reason is because my little box is practice for the legs for my bathroom vanity I intend to build. I wanted 5-6" square legs but there are none in hardwood so my idea was get the largest size I could find (maybe a fence post or something, and glue the hardwood onto that with mitered corners. I figured the fence post would be strong enough to hold any top I use for it whether it be granite or any other stone. I figured instead of wasting the wood practicing, I would build my box and store TP in it and also gain a mini table next to the toilet (hope that wasn't TMI,lol).

Thanks for the glue tip. I will certainly try it.

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post #15 of 17 Old 07-19-2016, 12:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Lexy View Post
Wow, Allpurpose that looks awesome! How'd you make the cuts?
Hand saw and chisel.. Takes practice..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #16 of 17 Old 07-19-2016, 02:22 AM
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I'm kinda late to this, but offer a suggestion of masking tape as a clamp when you glue it up. It holds even pressure all along the miter joint. You can lay out the sides, tape them up, add glue and then "roll" up the box and tape the last joint. You can find videos on YouTube if my description of the technique is too vague- I picked the tip up from fine woodworking magazine.
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post #17 of 17 Old 07-19-2016, 05:16 AM Thread Starter
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Never too late. Thanks for the tip!!


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