Help. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 10:38 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Outside Atlanta, GA
Posts: 58
View Better Place's Photo Album My Photos
Help.

Being new to this site and to woodworking in general, I first want to say thank you to everyone that posts here. Your knowledge and insights have provided me with a wealth of knowledge that would have taken several lifetimes to acquire.

Anyway, I wanted to try a project that would be simple and end up functional. Hence, the birth of two cutting boards.



Lessons learned:
- There is a tool for every purpose. (I don't have a jointer or planer so there was a TON of sanding)

- Don't try to take shortcuts. (The aforementioned lack of a jointer/planer led me to think "I have a table saw! Just crank it all the way up and voila!" Needless to say that didn't work resulting in more sanding. Not to mention the safety risk involved.)

- Sharp bits are needed for good quality results. (I have a 70's era router that was given to me by a friend. With the original bits. While the router did it's job, the bit I used burned the heck out of the oak, but flew through the poplar.)

- Time in the shop (read garage) is worth every second when you end up with a tangible product at the end.

Now to my newbie question...

I used mineral oil and beeswax to finish the boards. However, when you run your fingers over the surface, you can still feel the glue in every joint. I have sanded and sanded and sanded and still can't seem to make them go away.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance!
Better Place is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 05:51 PM
Senior Member
 
Dave Paine's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 7,222
View Dave Paine's Photo Album My Photos
You selected a difficult board construction considering you say you are new to this, and do not have an easy way to sand the final assembly.

I have made many boards, although so far only one end grain.

When you say you can feel the glue joints, do you mean the glue lines are slightly "proud" of the wood.

You did not say how you sanded. Free hand with sand paper or using sand paper on a block, etc.

The oak and especially the poplar are soft woods. The glue line is going to be much harder than the rest of the board.

You could try attaching sand paper to a very flat surface, e.g., glass and then moving the board over the paper.

I have a granite slab I use for this purpose. Mine is 12 in x 18 in. I use PSA paper.

Even if you have a flat sanding surface, it is possible the abrasive is just going to remove more of the softer media (the wood) than the glue line. You may end up having to accept this.

I have attempted to attach a file of a face grain board I recently made. I think such a design would take you less time and could be done with your present tools easier than end grain.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Dee_board_top_small.jpg
Views:	175
Size:	57.2 KB
ID:	45374  

Dave Paine is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Dave Paine For This Useful Post:
mackem (05-30-2012)
post #3 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 05:54 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 3
View Woow's Photo Album My Photos
Nicely done
Woow is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 06:49 PM
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 5
View Wood Master's Photo Album My Photos
Those boards look really good considering you just started with wood working and dont have a plainer or jointer. Must have been a real pain in the butt having to sand that by hand! Looks good though!
Wood Master is offline  
post #5 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 07:16 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Outside Atlanta, GA
Posts: 58
View Better Place's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
You selected a difficult board construction considering you say you are new to this, and do not have an easy way to sand the final assembly.
I guess things are only difficult if you know they're supposed to be that way when you start. Actually, I watched the video in the tutorial section and was inspired.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
When you say you can feel the glue joints, do you mean the glue lines are slightly "proud" of the wood.
That's exactly what I am talking about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
You did not say how you sanded. Free hand with sand paper or using sand paper on a block, etc.
I have an older Craftsman belt sander with 36 grit belts I used for the heavy sanding and then I used a palm sander with 120 paper on it to smooth them out. The wood is smooth, just has slightly raised glue lines on them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
The oak and especially the poplar are soft woods. The glue line is going to be much harder than the rest of the board.
This is what I was trying to avoid. I have a couple friends that are chefs and was talking with them about the boards and discussing how to protect their knife edges.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
You could try attaching sand paper to a very flat surface, e.g., glass and then moving the board over the paper.

I have a granite slab I use for this purpose. Mine is 12 in x 18 in. I use PSA paper.

Even if you have a flat sanding surface, it is possible the abrasive is just going to remove more of the softer media (the wood) than the glue line. You may end up having to accept this.
That's a great idea. I just don't know if I have anything around here I could use...

Would a jointer help? Or would the glue just dull the blade more than what it's worth?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
I have attempted to attach a file of a face grain board I recently made. I think such a design would take you less time and could be done with your present tools easier than end grain.
Your board is beautiful! What did you use for the inlay around the edge?
Better Place is offline  
post #6 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 07:22 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Outside Atlanta, GA
Posts: 58
View Better Place's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woow View Post
Nicely done
Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wood Master View Post
Those boards look really good considering you just started with wood working and dont have a plainer or jointer. Must have been a real pain in the butt having to sand that by hand! Looks good though!
Thanks! Pain in the butt is an understatement. I started with 1 1/2x1 1/2x36 oak and poplar boards from the big orange box store. The first gluing I got them as straight as I could without making a huge mess. After the first cuts, I put newspaper on my workbench (brilliant idea I know!) and proceeded to glue half the Comics to the underside for the second gluing. Squeeze out can be an evil thing if you don't think about it. Anyway, about three hours of sanding later, I took the pic above.

You can see some paper stuck to this one near the clamp.


Last edited by Better Place; 05-30-2012 at 07:39 PM.
Better Place is offline  
post #7 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 08:07 PM
Senior Member
 
johnnie52's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tampa, FL - USA
Posts: 3,391
View johnnie52's Photo Album My Photos
Speaking of squeeze out. Did you remember to use a damp rag to remove the squeeze out before it dried? I've made several things that required mixed wood types to be glued together and have not had any problems with the glue lines being proud of the finished surface.

Planers and /or jointers won't be of much help on end grain panels. About the only thing I can suggest to you at this point is to make a router sled and run a 3/4" straight bit over the entire surface to get everything flat. Then use your sander to smooth it out.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52
johnnie52 is offline  
post #8 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 08:12 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Outside Atlanta, GA
Posts: 58
View Better Place's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnie52 View Post
Speaking of squeeze out. Did you remember to use a damp rag to remove the squeeze out before it dried?
Ummmmmm...no.

But now that I know, I'll be sure to remember next time!

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnie52 View Post
Planers and /or jointers won't be of much help on end grain panels. About the only thing I can suggest to you at this point is to make a router sled and run a 3/4" straight bit over the entire surface to get everything flat. Then use your sander to smooth it out.
Cool! I'll try that and see what I get! Thanks!
Better Place is offline  
post #9 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 08:31 PM
Senior Member
 
johnnie52's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tampa, FL - USA
Posts: 3,391
View johnnie52's Photo Album My Photos
In case the idea of a router sled is confusing, allow me to suggest you watch the video at
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/

The video is in the upper left of the opening page and while its for a large work bench, the idea is the same for something smaller.

Good luck.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52
johnnie52 is offline  
post #10 of 10 Old 05-30-2012, 09:35 PM
Senior Member
 
Dave Paine's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 7,222
View Dave Paine's Photo Album My Photos
As other replies mentioned, it is a good idea to remove most of the squeeze out before it gets too hard.

I watch the squeeze out to determine when I can remove the clamps. This is typically when the squeeze out has a skin, but before it becomes too hard and dark brown.

I then scrap off onto a paper towel using e.g., a plastic scraper or a $5 gasket scraper from an autoparts place.

The inlay on my board is called "In-Lace". It is an epoxy with various dyes or media. In this example it is turquiose.

I agree with other reply. I do not think a jointer would help in this case.

I have a jointer and would not try and use for end grain.

I may consider a router with a sled. Just make sure the sled supports the router without deflecting.

I made a router sled to flatten a 3ft x 5 ft maple kitchen top. This worked "almost". It deflected in some spots. I am now considering making a new version which will not deflect to fix the dimples and scars from the last few years of use.
Dave Paine is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome