Grrr-ripper - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 08:40 PM Thread Starter
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Question Grrr-ripper

Reading the postings in this forum has saved me time, money but most of all fingers. Once again I find myself thinking about buying a product I have never even heard of.. It's the base model micro jig GRR-ripper @ about 60 bucks. Has anyone used this product? What do you think of it? Did I put this in the wrong place ? Sorry







I thank you for your input. I prefer to learn from the mistakes of others if I can.

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post #2 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 09:02 PM
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I have one and I find it very handy. It takes cuts that were once scary and makes them routine. It's well built and highly adjustable.

Seems like a lot of $$ for a glorified push stick, but in practice I've found it to be worth the cost of admission.
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post #3 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 09:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glassnwood
Reading the postings in this forum has saved me time, money but most of all fingers. Once again I find myself thinking about buying a product I have never even heard of.. It's the base model micro jig GRR-ripper @ about 60 bucks. Has anyone used this product? What do you think of it? Did I put this in the wrong place ? Sorry

I thank you for your input. I prefer to learn from the mistakes of others if I can.
I saw one at the Woodpeckers booth last weekend in Kansas City at the Wood Show. Looked pretty impressive. The sales guy was sure good with it.

Mark

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post #4 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glassnwood View Post
Reading the postings in this forum has saved me time, money but most of all fingers. Once again I find myself thinking about buying a product I have never even heard of.. It's the base model micro jig GRR-ripper @ about 60 bucks. Has anyone used this product? What do you think of it? Did I put this in the wrong place ? Sorry







I thank you for your input. I prefer to learn from the mistakes of others if I can.

I'll have to take the counterpoint to Ben... I've had one for about a year and a half now.. seldom use it. You need to remove the blade guard, riving knife and kickback pawls to use it. Trading 3 safety devices for one?????? I haven't really gotten comfortable with it, mainly because my whole life with power equipment has focused on keeping my ham hooks away from sharp, spinning objects, this thing makes me pass my hand directly over the blade. No warm fuzzy for me on that one. My main objection is not being able to use the riving knife as I think I'm more wary of kickbacks than anything else.
I've got the upgraded model with the angled handle kit and some other dodads.

John

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post #5 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
I'll have to take the counterpoint to Ben... I've had one for about a year and a half now.. seldom use it. You need to remove the blade guard, riving knife and kickback pawls to use it. Trading 3 safety devices for one?????? I haven't really gotten comfortable with it, mainly because my whole life with power equipment has focused on keeping my ham hooks away from sharp, spinning objects, this thing makes me pass my hand directly over the blade. No warm fuzzy for me on that one. My main objection is not being able to use the riving knife as I think I'm more wary of kickbacks than anything else.
I've got the upgraded model with the angled handle kit and some other dodads.
There is no reason to remove the riving knife to use this, I keep mine on 100% of the time. Granted it won't work with a blade guard or splitter but the riving knife works fine with it...
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post #6 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by bigben View Post
There is no reason to remove the riving knife to use this, I keep mine on 100% of the time. Granted it won't work with a blade guard or splitter but the riving knife works fine with it...
May have a terminology thing here. My impression is the riving knife is what the blade guard hangs onto and sticks above the blade. Whatever it's called, it can't be used with the Griipper. I do use the Gripper on occasion which are usually associated with the router table. And there are cases where it is the safest way to make a cut. The nice part about having several different types of safety equipment is being able to select the one you're most comfortable with.

John

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post #7 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 10:14 PM
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Yeah a riving knife it level with the top of the blade and moves up and down with he blade, it can remain in place even for non through cuts. A blade guard is connected to a splitter, which has to be removed for non through cuts.

Ill take the grr riper off you hands if it isn't getting use, I wouldn't mind a second for hand over hand :-)
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post #8 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 10:27 PM
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I have two of them and have been using them for at least 5 years. I love em! Much better and safer then push sticks. I would definitely buy them again. Pricey but highly adjustable and suitable for a lot of different tasks.

They are perfect when ripping narrow boards.

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post #9 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 10:54 PM
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I've owned one for quite a few years and although I don't use it all the time, I'm glad I have it. I mostly use a homemade push stick with a long neck that allows me to keep downward pressure on my boards. Like John, I like having choices when it comes to safety issues and whatever makes me most comfortable is what I use. I use it mostly on the router table and also the jointer, ts, bandsaw... it is a very versatile tool and holds wood to any surface.

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #10 of 25 Old 01-30-2013, 11:43 PM
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I bought one after seeing the video on the Wood Whisperer's site. As mentioned, it can't be used if the guard is on, which it is for most of my cuts. But, it's about the best thing going for cutting thin pieces, which I do with the riving knife in place. Ex., I was cutting 1/4" strips of mahogany for edge trim; the grrr-ripper works great for pushing that narrow strip through between the blade and fence, better than anything else I've ever tried. Same thing ripping 5/8" strips for picture frame trim.

I'm thinking of getting another one so I can do hand over hand as in the video I watched. A fairly expensive push stick, but I find it's well thought out and makes certain cuts safer than other methods I've tried.

Just my 2 cents.
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post #11 of 25 Old 01-31-2013, 08:10 AM
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Have to agree with sailorman. It is great for thin cuts. I have 2 of them for use with long boards. Wipe the pads down with mineral spirits to keep it clean so it doesn't slide on your wood as you are pushing it.
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post #12 of 25 Old 01-31-2013, 08:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben
The nice part about having several different types of safety equipment is being able to select the one you're most comfortable with.
I think this is the key statement. I have one too and while I don't use it on every cut it fits the bill when other push sticks don't. Good to have in the arsenal.
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post #13 of 25 Old 01-31-2013, 09:01 AM
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I'm more into shop made pushers.
Here is one I use a lot. Great for narrow rips. The big know is just a handle. I have different width feet for it.
Also here is a link to a gripper clone. http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...Gripper-Clones
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post #14 of 25 Old 01-31-2013, 09:41 AM
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I have that gripper clones page bookmarked too

I think the real ones are a nice product, but they cost about 3x what I feel they should. One of these days I'll get around to making some like the ones above.
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post #15 of 25 Old 01-31-2013, 09:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all of you. I am saying yes to the gripper, with the options & the CD. At least I'll know what I need to be doing if I have a picture.

Learning to fix your mistake's is very time consuming
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post #16 of 25 Old 02-02-2013, 03:40 AM
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I have one that I picked up at the Woodworking Show a few years ago and it's made some scary (I wouldn't have even attempted them) cuts pretty safe.

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post #17 of 25 Old 02-02-2013, 10:52 AM
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I have a couple and use them mostly on the jointer. I have had the problem of the small projections braking off with simple impacts with the floor. I thought such a tool would be a bit more robust!
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post #18 of 25 Old 02-02-2013, 11:42 AM
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@Pirate - Thanks for the link. I like the look of the clones better than the originals. I also bookmarked the link

John

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post #19 of 25 Old 02-02-2013, 08:53 PM
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I have two of them and I love them. I bought my first one very shortly after I started woodworking, so I don't have much experience with other style push sticks. To me the grr-ripper is much more than a push stick. It is a safety guard as well. I don't have any problem using it in place of the blade guard, when I can pass it over the blade. My hands are completely isolated from the blade when I use it. I have more control of the wood, as I can apply downward and forward pressure, as well as side force to keep the piece against the fence. These forces are applied to the keeper and the waste piece both. I have also used it to safely resaw wood on my table saw. I use a ZCI most of the time, so I can't use my saw's riving knife. I installed a MicroJig splitter on the ZCI, so I don't miss the riving knife.
Anyway the point of this longwinded post is that I love my grr-rippers and wouldn't want to be without them. YMMV.

Robert
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post #20 of 25 Old 07-20-2013, 05:04 PM
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I just bought the GR-200 model. Wow. It gives me a lot more confidence ripping narrow pieces. I didn't know there were clones until I found this thread just now. I might get a clone for the hand over hand work.
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