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post #1 of 9 Old 03-07-2009, 08:29 PM Thread Starter
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Green Wood

I bought a bunch of poplar today at an auction, but didn't realize the bundle I was bidding on was all rough sawn green poplar. I got it home and unloaded it, but not sure what to do with it now. Are there places that I can take it to that will dry it for me? If not, what am I supposed to do with it at this point. Any help in the right direction would be appreciated.
Nick
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post #2 of 9 Old 03-07-2009, 08:44 PM
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You can air dry it, takes 2 year per inch, or call your local mills, or make a kiln, I would go for the latter if you are creative. If you air dry do some research on how to do it correctly, and watch for bugs.
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-08-2009, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by nblumert View Post
I bought a bunch of poplar today at an auction, but didn't realize the bundle I was bidding on was all rough sawn green poplar. I got it home and unloaded it, but not sure what to do with it now. Are there places that I can take it to that will dry it for me? If not, what am I supposed to do with it at this point. Any help in the right direction would be appreciated.
Nick
Make sure you have it stickered - piled with boards (1 x 1 1/2 or something like this) between the layers. The stickers need to be spaced about 18" to 24" apart). You want to make sure air gets around each board so it doesnt mold or rot. This is how you would pile it for air drying or even temporary storage until you find someone to dry the wood.

You need to have the wood stacked in a flat. Start out with stickers on the ground or floor to allow air under the stack. On the top of the stack, put more stickers and a layer of water proof material if it is stacked outside. Put weight on the top to keep the top boards from warping.

Typically, it takes 1 year per inch of board thickness to be air dried properly. In July 2006, I had some hard maple cut for a work bench. The boards for the top were cut 1 3/4" thick - needing 21 months drying time. I let it dry in a cold storage area stickered until October 2008. I should have weighted the top layers - didnt realize the top layers were warping.

The bench top really turned out good - 2 5/8" thick x 36" wide x 75" long. I do need to flatten it. The base came out good as well.

With pine, you need to "set" the pitch. The wood needs to be dried at elevated temperatures so the pitch will not bleed out after you are done making the project. I would not build cabinets, shelves, whatever out of pine that is not kiln dried.

Rich (The Yooper)
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Last edited by Rich Aldrich; 03-08-2009 at 09:22 AM. Reason: Added bit about pine.
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post #4 of 9 Old 03-08-2009, 09:39 AM
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I don't know if this will help or not, but try checking out this thread.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f23/s...n-lumber-3103/
Hopefully this will help a little.
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post #5 of 9 Old 03-08-2009, 10:37 AM
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You can air dry it, takes 2 year per inch, or call your local mills, or make a kiln, I would go for the latter if you are creative. If you air dry do some research on how to do it correctly, and watch for bugs.
Not sure what part of the country your in but I regulary air dry green lumber down to 13% in a year or less depending on the air circulation and wood species.

Many myths out there about air drying times and they fail to take into account board thickness and species.

I can take Eastern Red Cedar green and have it down to 13% in about a month outside in the wind.
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post #6 of 9 Old 03-08-2009, 10:39 AM
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Air drying wood

3 links from a discussion in the "forestry and milling" section on proper handling of green lumber/air drying. dirtclod has a couple good ones http://www.chilternsaonb.org/downloa..._of_Timber.pdf
http://nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/rp/rp_nc228.pdf

I had one bookmarked too. Between these 3 I reckon there is about all you need to know on the subject
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplgtr/fplgtr117.pdf
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post #7 of 9 Old 03-08-2009, 06:32 PM
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I have never air dried softwoods, but with hardwood it always takes me about 16-18 months for 1" I must admit I have not done it a lot, and it is behind my shed without a lot of air circulation. In-between the shed and a fence.
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post #8 of 9 Old 03-09-2009, 01:22 AM Thread Starter
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wow guys. A lot of great information, Thanks. I want to use the wood pretty soon, and don't really want to wait 1+ years for it to dry. I went to my local woodcraft and they gave me a number of a guy to call about drying the wood. I talked to him this afternoon and he said he could dry the wood for me. He quoted me a price of $0.60 b/f I have no idea if this is a good price or not. What do you all think?
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post #9 of 9 Old 03-09-2009, 08:48 AM
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He quoted me a price of $0.60 b/f I have no idea if this is a good price or not. What do you all think?
Nick
Sound a little high to me...but if he does a good job and gets you in dry wood soon and you are satisfied with it then that is all that matters. I don't know how much you bought and for what price a BFT, but poplar sells for less than a $1 bft already dried and graded at most mills. So if you have less than that in it total you are doing OK.
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