Glueing solid wood trim to laminate worktop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 12-02-2018, 06:21 AM Thread Starter
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Glueing solid wood trim to laminate worktop

Hi,


I love my kitchen worktops that are 38 mm deep laminates with a solid beechwood trim (rectangular cross section with gently rounded edges 40mm x 12mm) but I need to replace some of them with new worktops. They are quite old and have mostly lasted very well, but I can't find any worktop manufacturer that can replicate the trim.

I am not very experienced at woodworking (I prefer the virtual world where my frequent mistakes can be rectified easily!), but I would like to glue a solid beechwood strip trim to new laminated kitchen worktops. Would it be best to have an exposed chipboard edge or a flat laminate edge and which glue would be best? Would it be really hard for long lengths.. would I need some 600mm plus wide clamps ?
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post #2 of 11 Old 12-02-2018, 08:19 AM
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You can buy rolls/strips of trim to match the colour of your tops.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/SELF-ADHESI...d+worktop+trim

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Last edited by johnep; 12-02-2018 at 08:22 AM.
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post #3 of 11 Old 12-02-2018, 09:27 AM
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I'd think that gluing the wood trim to the exposed particle board edge would hold well; probably better than gluing it to a laminate edge, depending on the type of glue you use. Common wood glue, i.e., Titebond, should bond the wood trim to the particle board OK.

Do you have a source for the edge trim stock? If not, you'd need to buy the proper wood somewhere & mill it to the size & profile that you want. Either way, I would expect that aligning the edge pieces to the tops might be difficult, especially if they're sort of long. If you glue on the edge piece, and parts of it extend slightly above the laminate surface, it would be hard to trim or sand the wood down without damaging the laminate surface. Not impossible, but not something I'd enjoy having to do. And if the wood is lower, then you have the laminate edge exposed; not much you could do about that.

If I were doing it, I'd route a slot in the edge of the top, and a matching slot in the trim piece, and use a spline to ensure alignment. And use a LOT of clamps.

If you can post a picture of what you're working with, others here may have some better advice.

Good luck!
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post #4 of 11 Old 12-02-2018, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DustyTop View Post
Hi,


I love my kitchen worktops that are 38 mm deep laminates with a solid beechwood trim (rectangular cross section with gently rounded edges 40mm x 12mm) but I need to replace some of them with new worktops. They are quite old and have mostly lasted very well, but I can't find any worktop manufacturer that can replicate the trim.

I am not very experienced at woodworking (I prefer the virtual world where my frequent mistakes can be rectified easily!), but I would like to glue a solid beechwood strip trim to new laminated kitchen worktops. Would it be best to have an exposed chipboard edge or a flat laminate edge and which glue would be best? Would it be really hard for long lengths.. would I need some 600mm plus wide clamps ?
Can you post some pictures?
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post #5 of 11 Old 12-02-2018, 08:45 PM
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You can have custom molding made or you can have a router bit made to match the trim. This can be time consuming and expensive. It might be simpler to tear all the edge off and put different trim on all of it.
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post #6 of 11 Old 12-02-2018, 11:10 PM
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As Stevedore pointed out, there are some tricks to getting it right. For an experienced woodworker, it's no big deal, but as you maintain that you are inexperienced, my advice would be to locate a cabinet company in the area and ask them to do it for you.



Beyond that, definitely want to glue to the particle board, rather than the laminate.
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post #7 of 11 Old 12-03-2018, 06:23 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the replies. Here in the UK I have only found one manufacturer who can glue solid trim on, but they only offer a rather ugly profile with a square notch at the top. I think I will probably have to give up.

Here is a pic anyway
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post #8 of 11 Old 12-03-2018, 08:09 AM
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buying new OR re-trimming old ones?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DustyTop View Post
Hi,


I love my kitchen worktops that are 38 mm deep laminates with a solid beechwood trim (rectangular cross section with gently rounded edges 40mm x 12mm) but I need to replace some of them with new worktops. They are quite old and have mostly lasted very well, but I can't find any worktop manufacturer that can replicate the trim.

I am not very experienced at woodworking (I prefer the virtual world where my frequent mistakes can be rectified easily!), but I would like to glue a solid beechwood strip trim to new laminated kitchen worktops. Would it be best to have an exposed chipboard edge or a flat laminate edge and which glue would be best? Would it be really hard for long lengths.. would I need some 600mm plus wide clamps ?
So, buying new ones!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
You can have custom molding made or you can have a router bit made to match the trim. This can be time consuming and expensive. It might be simpler to tear all the edge off and put different trim on all of it.
Not re-trimming old ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DustyTop View Post
Thanks for all the replies. Here in the UK I have only found one manufacturer who can glue solid trim on, but they only offer a rather ugly profile with a square notch at the top. I think I will probably have to give up. Here is a pic anyway
Giving up?

If you give up, then what? It seems unlikely that where you are located that a cabinet shop would not be able to supply a molding to trim out new counter tops. Maybe using Beechwood is the issue? Can you use a different wood type, Maple or Birch for example, which are more common?

In any case a Titebond glue type 2 or 3, will work to glue the strips to the exposed partical board edge. The trick will be getting the surfaces flush at the top so there not a "catch" when running things over it. A skilled cabinet or counter top maker can do this, if you don't have the skills or equipment. A simple 1/4" deep rabbet in the trim can be made to locate it exactly on the edge and flush with the top. Typically the trim would be 11/2" or so high so it will look like a thicker top, so plenty of width for a rabbet.

A good lumber mill will have all sorts of trim to choose from in different profiles:
http://armstrongmillworks.com/moldings.aspx


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 11 Old 12-03-2018, 09:35 AM
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Dusty - you don't need expensive tools or a custom carpenter shop
to attach nice wood trim to a table top.
the standard 1/4" Slot Bit to cut a slot in both sides of the stock
that is equally spaced in both pieces and insert a matching
wood spline with yellow glue and it will hold until the cows come home.
some method of clamping while the glue dries is required.
either pipe clamps or the nylon ratchet straps will work fine.
then, you can use your choice of roundover bits to soften the edges
if you so desire.
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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 12-03-2018 at 09:59 AM.
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post #10 of 11 Old 12-04-2018, 06:25 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Woodn & John for that interesting advice. I can only keep some of the old tops - the biggest L shape is too damaged.

I have been thinking about buying a router and probably will so whatever happens with my kitchen I think I might be back on here!
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post #11 of 11 Old 12-04-2018, 06:45 PM
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ohhhh - we were thinking you had a router.

you could still use finish nails (the ones without the head)
and glue and nail the wood trim to the top. then sink the
nail head and fill with wood putty.
good luck in all your projects !!

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --
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