getting started no masks! - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 33 Old 05-21-2020, 09:16 PM
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Seems like the millennial got into wood and now everything is dangerous....wear a mask when applying wood glue - is that next?
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post #22 of 33 Old 05-21-2020, 11:39 PM
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Epicfail48 & Dr. Robert nailed it, although way more briefly/delicately than the gravity of the situation commands.

Wood particulates (dust) are carcinogenic, it’s that simple, and it causes “brown lung” disease, which is not unlike the “black lung” that coal miners are prone to. Both conditions are cancer, and both will kill you in the worst of ways.

Additionally, many woods are allergenic after repeated exposure — some may react, some may not, and some may have a reaction that sends them to the ER. To this allergy thing,I can say simply that I wear a mask most times when I’m using any power tools or otherwise stirring things up, and I breathe noticeably better with the mask than without.

The simplest fix to this concern is to skip the power tools and develop your skills with hand tools. Go watch Paul Sellers on YouTube for some great inspiration on that.

Above all else: Have some fun woodworking!

Last edited by Scurvy; 05-21-2020 at 11:41 PM.
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post #23 of 33 Old 05-21-2020, 11:49 PM
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[QUOTE=DrRobert;2112449]For the sake of your future, I strongly suggest you rethink this.

I personally know one man whose retirement has been ruined by chronic lung disease. He had a commercial cabinet shop he told me they used a lot of MDF. Even with industrial grade dust collection.

Sanding is probably the most dangerous task in the shop. Even using a premium grade sander and dust extractor I still wear a mask.

I like the bandana/coffee filter hack!![/QUOTE

I worked in professional residential and commercial shops from 1983-2012. I worked as professional furniture maker from 2012-2019. I'm now disabled. I developed a small case od COPD from smoking since I was 13. Not from working I the shops.

You should always wear a mask in a small hobby shop. There is no reason to not, other than being lazy.

Yes I know of some one related that died specifically related to the cabinet shop. He owned the shop and it actually killed him...
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post #24 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 12:35 AM
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You do not need a mask to do woodworking...Did you grandpa have one??

He died in 1935, but we had an old carpenter who treated all us kids like his grandchildren. He died a miserable death from COPD. Never wore a mask, per your admonition. My daughter lived next to a guy who was a carpenter too, he also died a miserable death from COPD and lung problems. He couldn't be bothered to wear a mask.
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post #25 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 01:01 AM
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You do not need a mask to do woodworking...Did you grandpa have one??
Nope. He was also on oxygen and couldnt walk up a flight of stairs in his advanced age. Pappy also didnt have the bloody polio vaccine, should we just give up on that as millennial fear-mongering too? Know what the average life expectancy was in 1930? 58 for men, 62 for women. Come 2010, after all those pointless advancements in science and realizing what risks exist in activities previously thought to be harmless, those numbers were 76 for men and 81 for women.

Its almost like weve made advancements in personal health and safety since the times of our forefathers, and the argument that because they didnt do something means we shouldnt doesnt hold water, at all. You need a bloody mask, lungs arent designed to be filled with sawdust. Youd think the hundreds of papers linking inhaled sawdust to respiratory diseases would prove that point pretty well, but i guess every scientist, doctor and researcher in the world running studies on the subject are all taking kickback from the mask companies

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
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post #26 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 01:29 AM
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I have a "GVS Elipse", very comfortable mask and doesn't fog up my glasses. Not available these days though which sucks, I can't even get new filers for mine. Using a mask is a VERY good idea when woodworking, if you're using mostly hand tools you'll be fine. However if you're doing a lot of power sanding or running a few hunderd feet of material on a table saw it's not a bad idea to use one. General rule is if dust is going to go everywhere including your face then you probably should wear something. Some hate it but I'd rather not inhale buckets of sawdust into my lungs personally. I'm not worried about cancer or anything just don't like coughing my guts out when I'm sanding for a few hours.


-T

It's not bad to dream. But you also have to consider what's realistic. -All Might (Boku no Hero Academia)
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post #27 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 10:52 AM
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You do not need a mask to do woodworking...Did you grandpa have one??
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Seems like the millennial got into wood and now everything is dangerous....wear a mask when applying wood glue - is that next?
I'm sorry, but I have grown weary of the new, fashionable contempt for quality scientific research and the valuable, hard-won lessons that have come from it.

The simple answer is no, you do not need a mask to do woodworking. You can produce quality woodworking projects without wearing a mask. I did woodworking that way for a long time, because I didn't know any better. Now I wear a dust mask.

You can also prepare meals without washing your hands first. Would you want to eat in a place where the people who make the food never wash their hands? I have lived in countries where hand washing is not a common practice. Diseases like dysentery and cholera are more common as a result. Their grandpas didn't wash their hands, so why should they?

Many people try to learn from the valuable experiences of others. Some people must learn for themselves. With woodworking dust, the lesson is very long term and ultimately very unpleasant.
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post #28 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 12:08 PM
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You do not need a mask to do woodworking...Did you grandpa have one??
That means absolutely nothing....
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post #29 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 12:35 PM
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You do not need a mask to do woodworking...Did you grandpa have one??
hmmmmmm and a lot of coal miners didn't wear masks either.
have you seen a case of Black Lung up close and personal ?? (I have).

bottom line is:
YOUR shop, YOUR health, YOUR choice.
nobody will be at your side to enforce any kind of safety regs.
(at my age, I wear all the safety devices that are necessary for
the task at hand).

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.

I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things.

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 05-22-2020 at 12:39 PM.
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post #30 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 01:29 PM
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Are you planning to have a shop full of power tools or a cabinet full of hand tools, are you using solid wood or composite boards, it makes a difference how much protection you need.

There is a lot of information about the toxicity of different species of wood, do your research and start out with the less toxic species and use a basic mask or bandana if you are sanding or doing anything that produces dust.

Keep you shop clean, don't give dust a chance to accumulate, work outside if you have a dusty job.

You can have a lot of enjoyment in the meantime while waiting for this crisis to end and protective gear for the big stuff hits the market again if you use caution.
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Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #31 of 33 Old 05-22-2020, 02:41 PM
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Seems like the millennial got into wood and now everything is dangerous....wear a mask when applying wood glue - is that next?
What’s next? We will probably have to wear a mask when buying wood glue at the home center. Oh, wait..... we have to do that now!

(I couldn’t resist!).
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post #32 of 33 Old 05-31-2020, 10:30 AM
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My grandpa didn't, but he also died from lung disease You don't NEED them, but if you want to live a long healthy life without lung problems, it's a good idea to use masks-- and hearing and eye protection as well. My father was deaf and had heart and lung issues by the age of 65, he didn't use masks and he smoked in his shop, too.

I'm 64, I wear masks and other protection, no health problems.


So be as stupid as you want. It's your life.

Last edited by cynrich; 05-31-2020 at 10:37 AM.
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post #33 of 33 Old 05-31-2020, 10:49 AM
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I grew up riding in the back of trucks, riding a bike without a helmet, drinking from the garden hose, before seat belts in autos etc. No body back in those days would wear a mask to do woodworking, except in a few industrial shops. Whether you need a mask depends on what you do. Woodworking is an entire collection of fields of endeavor. Some are great at joinery, cabinetry, carving, turning and others. Depending on what field there are tasks that subject you to varying levels of dust and fumes. Carrying plywood into a shop is not particularly hazardous to breathing. Machine sanding what you make from that plywood certainly is hazardous to breathing. I am primarily a wood turner, although I do some refinishing and furniture repair. Sanding involving a machine, I wear a mask. simple cutting depends on how much dust is generated. On a nice spring day, like today, I have often pushed the table saw outdoors to do production cuts, if the wind is blowing the dust away, I might not wear a mask. There is a simple mask that can be made with a bandanna folded over a few times and shoe laces. Some turners I know actually use old C-PAP machines to provide fresh filtered air from outside the shop, but you are tethered to an inch diameter hose the entire time. Such machines are often prescribed to treat sleep apnea.
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