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post #1 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 05:43 PM Thread Starter
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Garage Door Panels

Hello all,

I've been thinking about making a garage door for almost a year, and am finally about ready to start. The current door is 9'x7' with 5 sections (three 16" tall and two 18" tall). It opens up and down and is connected to a garage door opener.

The idea is to use this tongue and groove cedar for the exterior:
http://www.customcedarproductsinc.co...s/tonguegroove

The cedar is 1"x10' with a 3" reveal when connected. The thought would be to make four 21" tall panels so that I'd use 7 cedar boards for each panel.

I had assumed that I'd make a frame out of 1x6s with butt joints and pocket screws. Something simple like:
http://cl.ly/image/2f152F1E381e

Since the cedar is .75" and the 1x6's will be .75" the door will already be the width of the current door. But I planned on putting some plywood on the back to make it more sturdy. Is this necessary, and if so should I use 1/4", 1/2", 3/4"?

I also wonder, would it be possible to not make a frame and simply attach the tongue and groove wood to 3/4" ply wood? I imagine the frame will provide a lot of strength but it sure would be easier to just attach to ply! :)

Any suggestions for what to make the frame out of? Hemlock?

Thanks!!!
Ricky
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post #2 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcancro View Post
Hello all,

I've been thinking about making a garage door for almost a year, and am finally about ready to start. The current door is 9'x7' with 5 sections (three 16" tall and two 18" tall). It opens up and down and is connected to a garage door opener.

The idea is to use this tongue and groove cedar for the exterior:
http://www.customcedarproductsinc.co...s/tonguegroove

The cedar is 1"x10' with a 3" reveal when connected. The thought would be to make four 21" tall panels so that I'd use 7 cedar boards for each panel.

I had assumed that I'd make a frame out of 1x6s with butt joints and pocket screws. Something simple like:
http://cl.ly/image/2f152F1E381e

Since the cedar is .75" and the 1x6's will be .75" the door will already be the width of the current door. But I planned on putting some plywood on the back to make it more sturdy. Is this necessary, and if so should I use 1/4", 1/2", 3/4"?

I also wonder, would it be possible to not make a frame and simply attach the tongue and groove wood to 3/4" ply wood? I imagine the frame will provide a lot of strength but it sure would be easier to just attach to ply! :)

Any suggestions for what to make the frame out of? Hemlock?

Thanks!!!
Ricky
If it were me I would make the frame out of 2x4 cedar and make the joints tongue and groove and insert the panels loose so there wouldn't be a issue of wood movement. If you added plywood to a thin frame it would be prone to warp and you would really need pressure treated wood and that would be heavy.
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post #3 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 07:22 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply!

This is what the garage looks like now:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rcancro/519242393/sizes/l/

The current door looks to be pretty much what you suggested: a 2x frame with 1/2"? panels in between. I'm looking to make something more like this:
http://www.dynamicdoorservice.com.au...s/dsc_1757.jpg

So I'm basically thinking about covering the frame with the tongue and groove cedar. Would a 2x frame be more solid than a 1x frame with plywood no the back?
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post #4 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 07:27 PM
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now you're talkin'

http://www.dynamicdoorservice.com.au...s/dsc_1757.jpg

This is a handsome contemporary looking door with only horizontals, no "frames". JMO That's what I would do, since you have 10 ft long pieces, unless I misunderstood.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 07:49 PM
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Most times I've seen wood like this on a garage door. It was applied over the existing door.Thats exactly what I would do. Open up the track and take off the door stop molding until you have enough room to install it. Call a garage door company to readjust the spring DON'T TRY TO DO IT YOURSELF. Very dangerous and should be done by someone that has the proper tools.

I would put the cedar through a planer and make them as thin as you can without losing the T and G. But you may still have to buy another spring.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.


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post #6 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 07:56 PM Thread Starter
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I'm doing a really bad job at explaining this! :)

I do want to make the exterior look like the photo:
http://www.dynamicdoorservice.com.au...s/dsc_1757.jpg

My plan was to build a frame and attach 9' long horizontal pieces of the tongue and groove to the frame. I meant frame like in framing a house -- nothing that would be visible from the exterior. That's what my crappy MS paint drawing was supposed to show -- the frame behind the tongue and groove.
http://cl.ly/image/2f152F1E381e

But I'm curious -- could I just attach the tongue and groove to 3/4" plywood? Would that be more likely to warp (especially since I don't think I can find 9' plywood)? Would making some type of rectangular frame to mount on be better? Or a combination of both -- 1x framing wood + 1/4" or 1/2" play on back? Would 2x framing wood work better than 1x + ply?

I hope it makes more sense this time. Thanks for the replies!!
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post #7 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:00 PM
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OK, then

What's the opening system for the door? Rollup? Hinged or tip up single panel? Side hinged?

The door in your picture was a sectional roll up.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-01-2014 at 08:02 PM.
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post #8 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:06 PM Thread Starter
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I planned on leaving the new door as a sectional roll up. The house was built in 1964 and the garage door opener looks to be about that old. :) My plan was to get a new one when the new door was done.

Al -- I like the idea of just attaching to the old door. Would there be any issue going straight over the windows? I guess not...
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post #9 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:08 PM
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I would build the frame with 2x lumber.

Remember, when you have the door open, the door is laying horizontal and spanning 9' with support only at the ends. There will be eventual sag if its not stiff enough.

Some doors have a small metal angle or channel attached inside across the width to prevent the sag.

Steve
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post #10 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcancro
I'm doing a really bad job at explaining this! :)

I do want to make the exterior look like the photo:
http://www.dynamicdoorservice.com.au...s/dsc_1757.jpg

My plan was to build a frame and attach 9' long horizontal pieces of the tongue and groove to the frame. I meant frame like in framing a house -- nothing that would be visible from the exterior. That's what my crappy MS paint drawing was supposed to show -- the frame behind the tongue and groove.
http://cl.ly/image/2f152F1E381e

But I'm curious -- could I just attach the tongue and groove to 3/4" plywood? Would that be more likely to warp (especially since I don't think I can find 9' plywood)? Would making some type of rectangular frame to mount on be better? Or a combination of both -- 1x framing wood + 1/4" or 1/2" play on back? Would 2x framing wood work better than 1x + ply?

I hope it makes more sense this time. Thanks for the replies!!
There's a reason they don't use plywood for garage doors. Too heavy, not flat, won't stay flat. You have to also think about how much it weighs when It's open over your head.

Before we had steel doors they were made with 1/4" Masonite glued to a 1" wood frame. They were hollow but light. They also stayed flat. Many times we glued and nailed cedar to these doors.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.


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post #11 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcancro
I planned on leaving the new door as a sectional roll up. The house was built in 1964 and the garage door opener looks to be about that old. :) My plan was to get a new one when the new door was done.

Al -- I like the idea of just attaching to the old door. Would there be any issue going straight over the windows? I guess not...
You can screw it on from the inside along with liquid nails. Take the glass out and fill it in with 1/8 material.

See if you have any room to move the tracks back.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.


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post #12 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cambriahouse
I would build the frame with 2x lumber.

Remember, when you have the door open, the door is laying horizontal and spanning 9' with support only at the ends. There will be eventual sag if its not stiff enough.

Some doors have a small metal angle or channel attached inside across the width to prevent the sag.

Steve
We have large 3" wide channel on the inside of all our garage doors. Gota stop the "canes" down here.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.


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post #13 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 08:31 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for replies! First I'll see if I can attach to the garage door I have. If that fails I'll go get some 2x to make 4 frames.
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post #14 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 09:01 PM
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they make replacement sections

Most garage door suppliers have replacement sections in the standard widths. If your door is not in the best shape or is wood to start with you have some decisions to make. Replace the bad sections. Replace the entire door.

Here's what I'm not understanding. One large frame won't fold. You need individual sections that are hinged along the horizontals. If you add considerable weight to the existing wood door it will be too heavy for the springs to overcome. The standard opener may not work.

A light weight, steel one panel tilting door may be a better solution...?

Steel sectional doors are somewhat lighter....

All wood doors are the heaviest.....

Frames won't have that full length contemporary look...

What are your thoughts?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #15 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by rcancro View Post
Thanks for the reply!

This is what the garage looks like now:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rcancro/519242393/sizes/l/

The current door looks to be pretty much what you suggested: a 2x frame with 1/2"? panels in between. I'm looking to make something more like this:
http://www.dynamicdoorservice.com.au...s/dsc_1757.jpg

So I'm basically thinking about covering the frame with the tongue and groove cedar. Would a 2x frame be more solid than a 1x frame with plywood no the back?
No I misunderstood what the finished product was to be. Instead of plywood on the back though make a faceframe to apply to the back which the boards were wide enough to mount the hinges to.
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post #16 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 10:36 PM Thread Starter
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The garage door is wood and it is sectioned. The door is old, but it is solid.

Unfortunately the heights of the sections aren't divisible by the width of the cedar, so my thought is to rip the final piece of cedar on each section so it fits. Then the next section will start with the other 1/2 of the rip. It may not look as perfect as the picture I sent, but don't think it will be that bad.

I am concerned about the weight of the door. But here is my current plan:
Try putting the cedar on the bottom section of the door and see how it looks. If everything looks good, I'll call a garage door company to get a new opener. The one I have now is super old and could wake the neighbors it is so loud. When they come out I'll make sure they see what I'm doing and give me new springs/stronger motor if necessary. Once they are done I'll finish up putting on the cedar.

If after putting the cedar on bottom section it looks bad, I'll go back 4 sections with 2x framing.
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post #17 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 10:43 PM
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that won't work

The opener and the springs have to be "tuned" to the weight of the door, so adding additional weight after the fact won't work.
Lift Master makes the greatest door openers! They have a wall mount that doesn't need a center rail. They are super smooth and quiet. THis one:
http://www.amazon.com/8500-LiftMaste...Garage+Openers

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #18 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 11:02 PM Thread Starter
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Ah, that makes sense. I think before I get too crazy putting wood on the door I'll give a local garage door company a call and get their take on it.

thanks again!
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post #19 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 11:09 PM
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Making the door out of wood in sections isn't that unusual. Not long ago most all overhead doors were made of wood and cedar is pretty light so I don't see a problem.
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post #20 of 24 Old 03-01-2014, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcancro
Ah, that makes sense. I think before I get too crazy putting wood on the door I'll give a local garage door company a call and get their take on it.

thanks again!
The weight can be adjusted for. Don't be surprised if the door company throws a wrench in the works. Just say thanks and find another company.

This is done quite often. Also it may be possible to make the cedar work out by starting the next panel with the piece you cut off. When the door is closed it looks right.

Al

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