Frame work - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 Old 10-28-2012, 02:58 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Mt. Home, AR
Posts: 18
View arkiewood's Photo Album My Photos
Frame work

Hello everyone, I am new here just registered. I have a question and probably many more to come. LOL
I am wanting to build a shelf unit for my utility room, and was wondering about the frame. Is there a standard size for side rails like 3" or 2 1/2"
I am using 3/4 oak frame and 3/4 oak plywood for shelves. What size should the cross piece to cover the edge of plywood shelve be?
Thanks,
George S.
arkiewood is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 10-28-2012, 04:01 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Welcome to the club George.

I normally make a frame out of 3/4"x2" stock with just the bottom rail at the floor being 3 1/2" on cabinets that don't have a toespace. The edge on the shelves I normally use a screen molding 3/8"x3/4" on the edge of the shelves. If the shelf is expected to have a heavy weight put on it I sometimes make the molding 1 1/2" wide.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #3 of 6 Old 10-28-2012, 04:30 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos

Quote:
Originally Posted by arkiewood View Post
Hello everyone, I am new here just registered. I have a question and probably many more to come. LOL
I am wanting to build a shelf unit for my utility room, and was wondering about the frame. Is there a standard size for side rails like 3" or 2 1/2"
I am using 3/4 oak frame and 3/4 oak plywood for shelves. What size should the cross piece to cover the edge of plywood shelve be?
Thanks,
George S.
Can you give some overall dimensions...width, height, depth, and how many shelves? Or, better yet, how about a rough pencil sketch.





.
cabinetman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 Old 10-29-2012, 06:38 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Mt. Home, AR
Posts: 18
View arkiewood's Photo Album My Photos
the shelves are actually going to be corner shelves. 29" deep from front to corner and 58" across the front. I will have to put strips on the walls under the shelves for support and mount shelves to. Then just attach the face frame after shelves are installed
arkiewood is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 10-29-2012, 07:09 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by arkiewood View Post
the shelves are actually going to be corner shelves. 29" deep from front to corner and 58" across the front. I will have to put strips on the walls under the shelves for support and mount shelves to. Then just attach the face frame after shelves are installed
If you are going to use just the existing walls for the sides, support strips will hold the 29" edge. For vertical and horizontal framing, I would use a minimum of 2" to 2". The span across the front is pretty long with no center supports.

If you want it to have a "cabinet" look, set up a toekick recessed back from the front edge of the bottom shelf, no more than 3" back. You could make a triangulated toe kick to just set the first shelf on, if you need a shelf that might carry more load.





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #6 of 6 Old 10-29-2012, 07:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Be sure to put a center stile on your faceframe and attach them to the shelves. 58" is too far without a center support. I would probably put a 2 1/2" to 3" wide stiles on a corner cabinet especially if you plan to put doors on it. I normally build a corner cabinet complete with a back and install it as a assembled cabinet. If you plan to put doors on the cabinet and assemble it on site in the corner you might put a plumb bob on the shelves to make sure they are all straight with each other. Assembling it against the wall you at the mercy of how straight and true the two walls are. If for example the wall bows in it would make your faceframe bow in and it would make your doors look warped.
Steve Neul is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Deck frame work and footings netman General Woodworking Discussion 14 05-10-2012 12:22 AM
Bed frame 6SpeedSD Design & Plans 9 03-02-2012 04:04 PM
Securing face frame to face frame? hubaseball General Woodworking Discussion 10 01-21-2011 04:42 AM
Frame in Lid ? iceberg General Woodworking Discussion 2 11-22-2010 02:36 AM
Anti-Slip Tip for work sliding on your work surface. Bearcreek Tips, Tricks, & Homemade Jigs 3 08-19-2009 08:08 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome