Forrest Woodworker ll- suggestions - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 01:38 PM Thread Starter
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Forrest Woodworker ll- suggestions

Hey all. Im going bite the bullet and get myself a high quality TS blade. Which Forrest blade would yall recommend? I cut lots of poplar and some hardwoods along with ply panels. Usually nothing more than 2 on my Grizzly G0833p.


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post #2 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 02:31 PM
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I would suggest the ultra planer blade from Forest:

https://www.sliversmill.com/category...traPlaner.html

I forgot to add, check and see if Forest still resharpens blades, they were the absolute best I ever tried. When you first put that blade on, pay attention how quite it cuts compaired to other blades.

Now where is my commission check? LOL JK

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Last edited by BigJim; 11-18-2019 at 02:34 PM. Reason: Added
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post #3 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
I would suggest the ultra planer blade from Forest:

https://www.sliversmill.com/category...traPlaner.html

I forgot to add, check and see if Forest still resharpens blades, they were the absolute best I ever tried. When you first put that blade on, pay attention how quite it cuts compaired to other blades.

Now where is my commission check? LOL JK

They do still do sharpening.
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post #4 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 08:09 PM
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I am not a fan of Forrest blades. IMNSHO they seem to be way over priced. They are great blades up to inch deep cut. As the thickness of the wood increases the effort to push the wood through significantly increases and the speed of the slows down.

My suggestion would be a full kerf combination blade. Either 40 or 50 teeth. (8 or 10 sets of 4 ATB with a raker) Freud or Irwin (HD or Lowes) would make you happy.
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post #5 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 08:26 PM
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MY WW 2 is still unused!

Years ago I bought the best blade I'd heard of just in case I was going to need it someday down the road. I'm still waiting for that day to come so I can try it out compared to my current blades of choice, Freud Diablo thin kerfs in 24, 40, 50, 60 and 80 tooth variations.

I guess I've never needed anything "better," what ever that means? I have about 10 unused 10" blades, from Deltas, a couple of Dewalts and some extra Freuds, and of course the Forrest WW 2.


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post #6 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 08:32 PM Thread Starter
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Ive had bad luck with Frued and Marples. Both cut nice but both blades I owned had a warp in them that created non square cuts no matter how I aligned the fence and blade. One side would be square but when crosscutting the other side would be off by a tiny bit which would create bad glue ups.


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post #7 of 18 Old 11-18-2019, 08:33 PM
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One thing ive noticed about my forrest blade compared to cheap stuff, its HEAVY. Like "what in the world" heavy compared to my cheaper blades.

That said ive had plenty of success with cheap hico blades off amazon...
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post #8 of 18 Old 11-19-2019, 12:08 AM
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I've got 4-5 forrest blades and I love them.
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post #9 of 18 Old 11-19-2019, 12:28 AM
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One of my favorite blades was a CMT industrial combination blade. I would rate this blade right up with the best.

I never had a bad experience with Forest or CMT, for me, that was about as good as it gets. I just checked, the CMT blades have really come down in price since I was in business. Back in the 70s they were over $100 then. Maybe they have changed and not as good as they were, I don't know.

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post #10 of 18 Old 11-19-2019, 05:42 AM
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Summary:
* Forrest Blades are expensive, but excellent blades. Whether they are a good value and worth the high cost is difficult to say.
* If I had to choose a single Forrest 10 inch general purpose blade for a table saw, I would suggest one of their "modified #6" ATB+R blades:
Full kerf: part number WW10406125, https://www.forrestblades.com/woodworker-ii-modified/
Thin kerf: part number WW10406100, https://www.forrestblades.com/woodworker-ii-thin-kerf/

* If you want a "top quality" general purpose table saw blade for less money, consider the Freud Fusion:
Full kerf: part number P410, https://freudtools.com/products/P410
Thin kerf: part number P410T, https://freudtools.com/products/P410T
* The devil is in the details. See below.

I have two Forrest Woodworker II blades:

* A standard kerf (1/8 inch) Forrest Woodworker II blade. Model: WW10407125
https://www.forrestblades.com/woodwo...or-table-saws/

* A thin kerf (3/32 inch) "Modified #6 ATB+R" Woodworker II blade. Model: WW10406100
https://www.forrestblades.com/woodworker-ii-thin-kerf/

Here are a few notes and comments:

* I bought the standard kerf Woodworker II blade soon after I bought my first table saw, a jobsite saw. I did not have as much understanding of table saw blades then as I do now. Even so, I was not happy with the free blade that came with the saw, nor the other 10 inch blades I had in the shop, so I decided to order "the best" to see the full potential of my new saw.

* The standard kerf Woodworker II blade is an excellent saw blade. It is very stable and makes very clean cuts. It is far superior to the cheap blades I had before.

* The standard kerf blade is a common alternating top bevel (ATB) blade. It is designed for through cuts. If you try to use it for box joints, it will leave bat's ears and a "bump" (my term). That is true for any ATB blade.

* I spoke with a technical expert at Forrest, who suggested their modified alternating top bevel with raker (ATB+R) Woodworker II blade. ATB+R means angled (slicing) left, right, left, right, and then the fifth tooth is a flat raker tooth. The raker tooth cleans out the "bump", making it a better blade for the occasional box joint. (It still leaves the bat's ears, but it is good enough for me.) In addition, the Forrest expert told me that the raker tooth in the ATB+R configuration would make rip cuts faster, easier, cooler, cleaner, and better, with no major difference for crosscuts. I pointedly asked why people don't buy the modified blades instead of the ATB general purpose blades, and he admitted that he felt the same way, and didn't understand it either. He prefers the ATB+R style of general purpose blade, too. I ordered the thin kerf ATB+R blade.

* I wish I had a full kerf ATB+R blade; perhaps someday.

* I have had the full kerf Woodworker II blade resharpened once by Forrest. They did an excellent job. It cost $35, which is ~1/3 higher than the local resharpeners charge.

* I found an obscure note in the user manual for my table saw, which indicated a maximum blade body thickness of 0.090 inches. Blade body thickness is not available online, so I called Forrest for the information. According to Forrest, the full kerf Forrest Woodworker II blade has a thicker plate body than most blades, 0.095 inches, which exceeded the specification for my jobsite saw. When I measured it with calipers, I got a blade body width of 0.11 inches. I used it in the jobsite saw, anyway.

* I was at the local Rockler store when the Freud representative was there. We talked about my Forrest blades and he compared them with his own. He told me a few things about Forrest and Freud blades. I cannot confirm that they are true, but he convinced me. Keep in mind that Freud is making unsubstantiated claims about their competition Forrest blades. Here are his claims:
+ Forrest blades are no better than other blades. According to the Freud representative, it is Forrest's sharpening that makes them special. The Freud representative claimed that if you take a Forrest blade to an ordinary re-sharpener, you get an ordinary blade. I am not totally convinced of that.
+ Forrest uses good carbide, but does not make it themselves. In contrast, Freud makes its own carbide, and it is superior to other sources of carbide, including the carbide that Forrest uses.
+ The Freud Fusion blade has several tooth geometry and coating features that make it a better general purpose blade than the Forrest Woodworker II.
(As a result, I bought a Freud Fusion blade, but have not opened it yet.)
* Freud Fusion feature claims:
+ High angle ATB slices better. Notes: (1) ATB+R is not available. (2) I wonder whether it wears out and needs sharpening more frequently?
+ Tooth geometry is special. The teeth are angled slightly (axial face grind) and they have a double side grind, which means that back of the tooth is angled away from the cut, reducing side contact area and friction with the wood as it cuts. Less friction means less heat and less expansion of the teeth during the cut.
* Better carbide lasts longer than other brands.
* Coated blade reduces friction and contaminant build-up.

Since then, I replaced the jobsite saw with a cabinet saw and use the same Forrest blades on it. I will let you know when I open the Freud Fusion blade.

I think about buying a "Glue Line Rip Blade" for jointing with the table saw. In the meantime, the Forrest blades produce decent results. They cut very cleanly. I expect the same when I open the Freud Fusion blade.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 11-19-2019 at 05:46 AM.
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post #11 of 18 Old 11-19-2019, 09:27 AM
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we run forrest blades or freud glue line rip blades. these 2 seem to outperform any other blade we have tried.
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post #12 of 18 Old 11-19-2019, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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What is special about the glue line rip blade? It is a 30 tooth from what Ive seen so it should obviously make good rip cuts but will they end up clean? Good for making smooth faces for glue ups? The main thing Im concerned about is blade straightness as all the blades Ive used had a warp to them that made cross cutting useless, which is why Im thinking about Forrest blades as Ive heard their the straightest our there. Are the Frued blades straight from what yall have experienced?


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post #13 of 18 Old 11-19-2019, 02:11 PM
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@optimusprime has a Grizzly saw, so this comment does not apply to him/her.

SawStop ONLY:

Quoting SawStop's FAQ: "[...] blades with depth-limiting shoulders may take longer to stop in the event of an accident than standard blades, and you could receive a more serious injury. Therefore, SawStop recommends using blades without depth-limiting shoulders."

I call them "anti-kickback tails." They curl out from behind the carbide tips on some blades.

Some Freud blades have depth-limiting shoulders, including their glue line rip blade. The old SD-208 dado stack had them, but the current model SD-208S dado stack does not. I assume that the design change is due to SawStop. That's too bad for everyone else - it was a nice safety feature that could help prevent kickback.
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post #14 of 18 Old 11-20-2019, 12:20 AM
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"+ Forrest blades are no better than other blades. According to the Freud representative, it is Forrest's sharpening that makes them special. The Freud representative claimed that if you take a Forrest blade to an ordinary re-sharpener, you get an ordinary blade. I am not totally convinced of that. "

That is absolutely true. I took, what was, the best table saw blade ever into the store that you speak of for sharpening. The sharpening destroyed the blade. I got the blade along with a dado set from, then JESADA, now Infinity. The combination blade was good for ripping, cross cutting, plywood and melamine. The store took the blade back and had it resharpened. No difference and I didn't bother any more. The next time that I needed a blade sharpened it went back to the manufacturer. Lately I've been using blades from Anderson Saw in Hawthorne. WWW.Andersonsaw.net Note: dot NET not com.

About 10 or 15 years ago at AWFS I had a long conversation with the owner of a sharpening service in Santa Ana. He was considering the purchase of a new carbide sharpening machine that would do the grinds on the Forrest blades. He said that the machine was north of $100K.
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post #15 of 18 Old 11-20-2019, 05:35 AM
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I do agree it is the sharpening that makes difference. I made a mistake and took my forrest blade to my local sharpening place, and it i now a regular saw blade. It cuts but no any where as smooth as when Forrest sharpened it. Sending it to Forrest so they can correct my mistake.
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post #16 of 18 Old 11-20-2019, 06:32 AM
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Have you looked into Ridge Carbide? https://ridgecarbidetool.com/
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post #17 of 18 Old 11-25-2019, 01:35 PM Thread Starter
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I looked at the Tenryu blade and that looks promising. Where would I get something like that sharpened?


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post #18 of 18 Old 11-25-2019, 03:58 PM
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While researching something else unrelated, I found an excellent article on about different table saw blades. Among other things, it gives a good counter-argument about why you might prefer an ATB blade over an ATB+R blade - the raker tooth may increase tearout. Lesson learned for me: There is no free lunch.

I enjoyed reading this article. It is well organized and well written. It is worth your time to read it:

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/p...blesaw-blades/
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