Fold over table leaf hinge - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 03-23-2020, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
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Fold over table leaf hinge

Hello. I am building a teak table for my boat. It has 2 leafs that fold 180 degrees to make the table twice as big or half as big. I am at a loss how to start making a template to rout out the recesses for the hinges. I was hoping the hinges would come with a template but that doesn't appear to be the case. Here is a similar table and the hinges I am using. If there are similar hinges that look good and are easier to install I'd be good with that! Either brass or polished stainless / chrome would work. Link to the hinges for anyone interested: https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...d-table-hinges THX!
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post #2 of 12 Old 03-23-2020, 03:59 PM
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Greg - where you been for the past 12 years ??

how many hinges do you have to do ?
with a little practice, you can route the recess for half a dozen
hinges quicker than you make a jig.

and just a note on the table design: as you can see, the screws
that hold the hinges are pretty weak. much forethought must be
put into the support brackets that slide out from under the main
table. especially on a boat where someone can lose their balance
pretty quickly and the table catches a 250 pound downward load.

I love nautical projects !!!! please keep us in the loop during the
fabrication stages with periodic photos and notes.

.
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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 03-23-2020 at 04:10 PM.
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post #3 of 12 Old 03-23-2020, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
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I'll have to do 4 or 6 depending on whether I use 2 or 3 per side. As much as teak costs, I was hoping to find or make a jig. As for the leaf supports I've seen 1 1/2 x 7/8 teak pieces that slide out from under the table or full extension drawer slides (ugly if you can see them) but I was going to try these:

https://www.rockler.com/metal-drop-leaf-support


The last 12 years? I dunno - working on - and using - 'this old boat'. Back then I was putting in a new galley and was asking about the Dewalt 735 planer (works great). Since then lots of other projects like rewiring, plumbing, new windows etc. Most recently finished putting a new headliner throughout the boat. Finally getting around to the table.
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post #4 of 12 Old 03-24-2020, 12:07 PM
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Maybe I'm missing it, but wouldn't regular hinges work for that? Just mount underneath the leaf folded....then unfold to straight?


Or mount on the side open, then fold to open the leaf.


Like I said, maybe I'm not picturing how the leaves will open
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post #5 of 12 Old 03-26-2020, 01:07 AM Thread Starter
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The hinge has a positive stop at exactly 180 degrees. As Mr. Smith noted above, the outer edge of the leaf would have to be supported, but the stop will help keep the leaf level with the table. And I find this hinge attractive. It's a boat - pretty counts! Having just returned from Mexico (to Canada) I am in a 14 day home isolation period so I have plenty of time to make a few jigs!
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post #6 of 12 Old 03-26-2020, 07:52 AM
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Butler Tray Hinges

absolutely !! pretty counts !
my woodworking "passion" is with nautical projects.
I would much rather make a fancy bed rail or table with fiddles
than any kind of household furniture.
I am following this project with great interest.
Greg - you can install the hinges by hand and a little patience and practice.
I too am in my 2nd day of ANOTHER 14 day isolation - only this one is mandated.
(all the people from the NY/NJ hotspots are coming to Florida in droves).
I hope you can find a good design for the leaf supports vs the metal slides.
to me, they just don't go with a boat project like your table.
have you worked with teak before ? how will you be doing the fabrication ?
(some photos of your boat would be really nice to see).

Edit: yes, there are similar hinges that will perform the same task.
it is just a matter of preference and your skill level.
personally, I like the oval style vs the square as thy are more "nautical".
the square model is just a matter of roughing out the recess and fine
tuning it with a chisel and sharp gouges or carving knife.
[if you mess up a little in the recess or cut too deep, you can fill the
area with Bondo or two-part epoxy putty - and nobody will ever know].

Fold over table leaf hinge-butler-tray-hinges.jpg

.

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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 03-26-2020 at 09:27 AM. Reason: added photo
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post #7 of 12 Old 03-27-2020, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg View Post
The hinge has a positive stop at exactly 180 degrees. As Mr. Smith noted above, the outer edge of the leaf would have to be supported, but the stop will help keep the leaf level with the table. And I find this hinge attractive. It's a boat - pretty counts! Having just returned from Mexico (to Canada) I am in a 14 day home isolation period so I have plenty of time to make a few jigs!

I see now. Thanks for the clarification :)
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post #8 of 12 Old 03-27-2020, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
Greg - where you been for the past 12 years ??

how many hinges do you have to do ?
with a little practice, you can route the recess for half a dozen
hinges quicker than you make a jig.

and just a note on the table design: as you can see, the screws
that hold the hinges are pretty weak. much forethought must be
put into the support brackets that slide out from under the main
table. especially on a boat where someone can lose their balance
pretty quickly and the table catches a 250 pound downward load.

I love nautical projects !!!! please keep us in the loop during the
fabrication stages with periodic photos and notes.

.

Agree. Making the recess for the hinges is pretty simple. DO NOT practice on the teak. Use pine or some other cheap wood.


George
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post #9 of 12 Old 03-27-2020, 03:42 PM
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If worst comes to worst you can get a jig for your router:

https://www.rockler.com/jig-it-hinge...stem?sid=AF078

There is also several videos online on how to install them, do a search for installing "butlers hinge".

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post #10 of 12 Old 03-31-2020, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your replies. I was hoping to get started on this during my quarantine period but life kind of got in the way. When I get out of here I'll be out at the boat getting it ready for a haul out and survey. When you say "install by hand" do you mean rout out the recess with a router, or do it using only hand tools (chisels, knives etc.).

I have worked with teak but at a far simpler level than most here. I built a new galley using simple methods like lap joints for the doors and solid fronts with 3/8 x 3/8 rabbets for the drawers. A friend then came in and installed the fiddle rail on top and that made the whole project look good. He can make wood go around corners!

I'll post a picture when I can go there, but for now here is the boat.
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post #11 of 12 Old 03-31-2020, 07:32 PM
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awesome boat, Greg !!
I love that size without all the mess of a tuna tower. (keep it simple).
by hand: I mean rough cut the recess to the proper depth with a hand
router and fine tune the edges with hand tools (chisels, knives, X-Acto, etc).
since you only have a few to do, you can do all of them in less than an hour.
I ordered a set of hinges off of E-Bay last week just to see how hard it would
be to make a template for this hinge. this project pops up every now and
then the consistent answer is: "get the jig from Rockler" or ~ watch the video
on YouTube. I have installed dozens of these hinges myself but I am pretty
handy with a router where I can cut the recess up to the line with very little
cleanout with a knife. (but, then again, I make a LOT of signs
with routed letters - so I have a few decades of practice free-handing a router).
so - I am going to see just what it takes to make a jig that the average novice
with limited experience can make himself and have good results with it.
if you use some scrap hardwood to practice with, you can "white knuckle"
the bit pretty close to the line. a very sharp knife or even an X-Acto knife
to clean up the edges with. you can do it !!!!!
and I do agree ~ a Bondo patch around a table top hinge isn't all that impressive.

.

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post #12 of 12 Old 04-01-2020, 10:18 AM
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Personally a jig is the only way to do this if you want a perfect fit, but, depending on one's skill and the correct sweep carving gouges, this was the way it was done before routers.

The jig itself is easy to make. A hole the width of the hinge, then two cuts makes the slot. Add a cleat to give the correct offset. But sure to make the jig wide enough to allow clamps to clear the router base.

If the hinge width is an odd size, an adjustable hole cutting bit can be used. Scoring the cross grain straight lines will eliminate minimize tear out.

A template bit like this works well for hinges.

Robert
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