Fixing Misdrilled Holes - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Toolman50
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 81
View Arbee's Photo Album My Photos
Fixing Misdrilled Holes

Perhaps the one thing, as woodworkers, we all make is.........mistakes--especially this relative beginner.

I have several lengths of 1 X 3 wood (by 3/4" thickness) with a hole drilled near, but off its mark near the center of this (actual, as opposed to nominal) 2.5" width. The hole is drilled with a 1/4" bit, and it's "Fostnered" (i.e. I used a Fostner bit on either side around 3/4" in diameter) on either side of the aforementioned wood piece, about as deep as the height of a bolt head or nut.

The 1/4" hole is straight thru.

Long story short, I'd prefer not to remake the pieces with such errors as they form part of a larger glued up assembly--so I was thinking of using something like Minwax's Wood Hardener to completely seal up the wrong holes, and then redrill them once the repair has completely dried.

The work is invisible so I don't care how it looks...just that the repair is strong. This wood is invisible in the finished product/project.

Of course I'd try this first on a dummy piece of wood---but all this said. Questions:

Q1) Would you recommend another product for this repair, and maybe save the aforementioned product for wood rot over hole fillage?

(Since I'll be redrilling the correct hole nearby, something like wood putty, I fear, isn't the right product. The repair has to dry hard like the wood that use to be there.)

Q2) Would you be inclined to have me, rather than try to repair this, recreate the affected members "from the ground up?"

Q3) Having watched some youtube videos on this, including proper ventilation and correct ratios of product/hardener, have you any other thoughts?

Q4) How might you handle this--aside from not making the mistake in the first place! (LOL)

Again, so you have vision of the hole size, as you pass through the workpiece's thickness with "x-ray vision," invision a 3/4" dia. hole for about 1/4" and inch, a 1/4" diameter hole for about 1/2" an inch, and then, again, a 3/4" dia. hole for the remaining 1/4." Again, this hole is near the center, so there's plenty of existing wood "meat" between the hole and the sides of the workpiece for the amount of strength required here.

Thanks for your time and expertise!!!
Arbee is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 12:22 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 81
View Arbee's Photo Album My Photos
As I think about my own problem I am beginning to lean towards closing up the holes with two size wood dowels and wood glue.

Given the holes are uniform in size, dowels might be the better way to go--saving the epoxy for oddly shaped holes and gouges.

Should you feel differently, please say so.
Arbee is offline  
post #3 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 02:21 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
If it's not seen, I would be inclined to turn the board around so the hole isn't close to the correct hole. If that isn't possible then glue a dowel in the hole. We don't know the application though, perhaps it would be worth replacing the part if there is a lot of stress there.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 02:33 PM
Senior Member
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Channelview, Tx
Posts: 2,642
View MT Stringer's Photo Album My Photos
Yep, glue in a wood dowel, sand flush, redrill.

Maybe I missed it but did you use a drill press? With a fence?
Measure twice, drill once! :-)
MT Stringer is offline  
post #5 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 07:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,865
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
Cool

Glad I nevir make misteaks in woodwurking.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #6 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 08:06 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,950
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I'll be kind here ...you d...

You didn't, did you? Start over.
You will have more time and effort in doweling the two sizes of holes on both sides of the board than if you just chalked it up to "new woodworker syndrom" and started from scratch.

Use a fence on your drill press set to the proper distance. Make a few test samples before starting on the finished pieces. :smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #7 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 09:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Mistakes are a good thing. When you can learn to hide your mistakes you can call yourself a master craftsman.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #8 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 10:11 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,950
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
here's the problem with the dowels

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Mistakes are a good thing. When you can learn to hide your mistakes you can call yourself a master craftsman.
Dowels are end grain, the boards are long grain. To accurately drill a slightly offset hole into different grains will be an issue. Then the end grain will drill at a different rate than the long grain... it just ain't worth the hassle.

Hiding a mistake is one thing, if you can do it easily and without running into other unforeseen issues, and I've made my share of mistakes and fixed them. Some were self inflicted, other were of natural causes where the wood had a mind of it's own and split unexpectedly like in this chisel storage rack. The repair was invisible:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #9 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 10:29 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Dowels are end grain, the boards are long grain. To accurately drill a slightly offset hole into different grains will be an issue. Then the end grain will drill at a different rate than the long grain... it just ain't worth the hassle.

Hiding a mistake is one thing, if you can do it easily and without running into other unforeseen issues, and I've made my share of mistakes and fixed them. Some were self inflicted, other were of natural causes where the wood had a mind of it's own and split unexpectedly like in this chisel storage rack. The repair was invisible:

The op said the patch wouldn't show. I think if a dowel was glued in and allowed to dry another hole could be drilled right next to it without an issue. Like I said earlier we don't know what the hole is for and how much stress it would be under so it wouldn't be possible to say for sure a fix was feasible.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #10 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 10:37 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,950
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
I hope he does try the dowels

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
The op said the patch wouldn't show. I think if a dowel was glued in and allowed to dry another hole could be drilled right next to it without an issue. Like I said earlier we don't know what the hole is for and how much stress it would be under so it wouldn't be possible to say for sure a fix was feasible.
On each board there will be 3 holes in two different sizes to plug:
I have several lengths of 1 X 3 wood (by 3/4" thickness) with a hole drilled near, but off its mark near the center of this (actual, as opposed to nominal) 2.5" width. The hole is drilled with a 1/4" bit, and it's "Fostnered" (i.e. I used a Fostner bit on either side around 3/4" in diameter) on either side of the aforementioned wood piece, about as deep as the height of a bolt head or nut.

The 1/4" hole is straight thru.

So, there are 3 chances on each board for the bit to wander or have an issue. Good luck with all that. :frown2:






The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-15-2016 at 10:41 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #11 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 10:44 PM
Senior Member
 
michaelpugh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Fayetteville, Ar
Posts: 510
View michaelpugh's Photo Album My Photos
I just had to fill two holes today. Different reason, hanging a door and the old holes didn't match up to the hinge I was using. Filled the hole with glue then filled it with toothpicks and broke them off flush. Works great ever time if it's something you'll never see.

wish I had a cool line like everyone else...
michaelpugh is offline  
post #12 of 18 Old 10-15-2016, 11:25 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arbee View Post
As I think about my own problem I am beginning to lean towards closing up the holes with two size wood dowels and wood glue.

Given the holes are uniform in size, dowels might be the better way to go--saving the epoxy for oddly shaped holes and gouges.

Should you feel differently, please say so.
I see no reason to use two sizes of dowels.
I would drill through with the larger hole and fill with a wood dowel.
Popsnsons likes this.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #13 of 18 Old 10-16-2016, 03:02 AM
Village Idiot
 
epicfail48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Springfield MO
Posts: 4,710
View epicfail48's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Mistakes are a good thing. When you can learn to hide your mistakes you can call yourself a master craftsman.
I love this saying so, so much, just because of how true it is. It takes a lot more raw skill to hide a mistake, or even better turn a defect into a feature, than it does to 'not make a mistake'. I say that in quotes because theres never a project that doesnt have a mistake.

Of course, that last mindset is why i intentionally include a mistake in everything i make. If i know where the one mistake is, i dont make any more!

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
epicfail48 is offline  
post #14 of 18 Old 10-16-2016, 07:26 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,856
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Did we ever find out if the boards were 1"by 3" or 1' by 3'. Expensive wood or cheap wood.

Big difference in repairing or starting over.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #15 of 18 Old 10-16-2016, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 81
View Arbee's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you to everyone who offered their ideas. Toolman50: I'd like to offer you particular thanks for offering the simple but yet ingenious insight of simply drilling the affected holes straight through with a 3/4" bit, and then filling them once, with 3/4" glued in dowel material.

While I don't wish to bore people with the details, I will try to fill in the holes (at least with my explanations) below.

I saw this table on the internet, and without attempting to violate anyone's creative revenue, sought to recreate it. For me, much of the love of woodworking lies in mechanical projects that incorporate math. I don't sell my work (as if!!) and I am sure my product so deviates from this, which I attempted to recreate without blueprints, that no patents (if they even exist) were violated.


Okay, with that video seen by you, I concluded that the mechanics of my version--otherwise hidden from the table consumer's (i.e. my) view, would involve 8 lengths of (actual size) 3/4" thick, by 2.5" wide good quality wood, arranged in a star. Please see the picture. This would be time consuming to recreate--hence my desire to fix my mistakes, rather than rebuild from the ground up.

As is clear from my picture, many of the aforementioned holes, which lie at the end of each of the eight lengths, aren't centered as a result of "Stupid deliberance" on my part, to get them to line up with misaligned pegs that protrude from the Saturn like ring, (also shown) that rotates around the project's perimeter.

Should I have had the patience to do everything right the first time? Guilty!

For the terminally curious, at the end of the 8 lengths, the aforementioned holes connects with an arm (I've left only 1 arm still attached in the photo) with a length of 3/4" wide material removed from its center, that rides on these pegs, to allow the table's expanding leaves to emerge as the Saturn ring is rotated.

At the time I was inexperienced, lacking tools like a drill press where accurate hole placement and depth could be controlled and repeated, and most of all I was inpatient. I wanted to finish this project--which I will term a discovery build--and revisit it (what I am doing now) to fix my problems at some point in the future (i.e. now).

Of course the misplaced pegs and holes created unequally sized table leaves as the errors telescoped their way out from the center. Done correctly the leaves are 8 equally sized slices of a ring.

Today I own a large woodworking compass, and the knowledge from videos like this to find 8 equidistant places along a circle's perimeter.


..so, I will fill the holes in question, which are right now 3/4" wide in diameter for 1/4"depth, 3/8" wide for 1/4" depth, and 3/4" wide for 1/4"depth, redrill, reposition the pegs, recreate the arms and table leaves, and make this project right. This seemingly weird drilling pattern I just described was necessary so no nuts would protrude from the 3/4" thickness of each of the eight 3/4" X 2.5" points of the star.

Again, thanks....
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Arbee; 10-16-2016 at 12:20 PM.
Arbee is offline  
post #16 of 18 Old 10-16-2016, 01:34 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,950
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
try drilling in the end of a dowel

If you don't own a drill press and a means to secure the board on the table, you will have issues drilling a slightly off center hole. Birch dowels are end grain and won't drill easily. The issue is also what drill to use. A Forstner drill can not have a predrilled center hole. It needs the point on the end to start it in the proper location. If you drill the 3/4" hole first on one side how do you locate the 3/4" hole on the other side accurately without a small pilot hole OR the jig on the drill press?
If you just flip the board end for end and fill the holes with anything for appearances sake, then you will be better off. JMO.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-16-2016 at 02:38 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #17 of 18 Old 10-16-2016, 06:44 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 81
View Arbee's Photo Album My Photos
woodnthings: thanks....FWIW I HAVE acquired a drill press since this was originally created with a hand drill, and, of course, intend on using it this time around.

Sure--the inferior woodworker might blame his tools, but the worker of pretty much any skill level stands to do better with the right tools, jigs, prep, thought, planning, etc.

Again---stupid I admit---I made the conscience choice at the time to drill the holes off center to match the off center pegs. Conventional wisdom would have had me redo the pegs...or metaphorically first aligning the vehicle's chasis (pegs) after the "accident" before attempting to fix the car by "bending the new car doors to get them to line up."
Arbee is offline  
post #18 of 18 Old 10-16-2016, 11:44 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Arbee,
Thanks for the attached video. A great project and (Nice model).
I have seen other expanding tables but none like in the picture.
This is a very advanced project requiring exact fit to work properly.
A finished table like this might sell for several thousand dollars depending on size and type of wood.
If you are attempting your project without a purchased plan, you are braver than I am.
Please keep us posted on your progress.
I think you should attach the video to another post labeled expanding table so we can find it.
We won't remember to look under fixing misdrilled holes several months from now.
Good luck to you.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?

Last edited by Toolman50; 10-16-2016 at 11:51 PM.
Toolman50 is offline  
Reply

Tags
filler, minwax, repair, wood

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Filling 1" and other large holes - plywood lagagnon General Woodworking Discussion 13 03-02-2017 11:40 AM
Drawboring disaster craigwbryant General Woodworking Discussion 9 08-02-2016 11:01 PM
Newbie question on cutting large holes in thin plywood watson524 General Woodworking Discussion 17 06-25-2016 12:19 AM
Small screw holes in vintage tool chest acme97 General Woodworking Discussion 9 02-15-2016 11:43 AM
Preventing Plywood Splits with CS Holes EPAIII General Woodworking Discussion 5 11-17-2015 08:09 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome