Edge jointing both sides of a board? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 02-14-2016, 12:41 PM Thread Starter
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Edge jointing both sides of a board?

Hello,

Do you folks think it is necessary when milling a board to edge joint both sides rather than joint one side and rip the other side on a table saw? Or is edge jointing both boards only necessary when gluing up a panel? My projects typically consist of small boxed and picture frames... My process if joint one face, edge joint one side, plane the other side, and then rip the rough side on my table saw. But will jointing both edges produce a better board to work with?

Thank you!!
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post #2 of 6 Old 02-14-2016, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chueyjose
Hello, Do you folks think it is necessary when milling a board to edge joint both sides rather than joint one side and rip the other side on a table saw? Or is edge jointing both boards only necessary when gluing up a panel? My projects typically consist of small boxed and picture frames... My process if joint one face, edge joint one side, plane the other side, and then rip the rough side on my table saw. But will jointing both edges produce a better board to work with? Thank you!!
You can't make both sides parallel by running both sides across the jointer. Your process is correct. If I'm doing a panel glue up I joint both edges, but I joint the second side after it has been ripped parallel.
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post #3 of 6 Old 02-14-2016, 01:12 PM
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That's one of the reasons for the edge jointer. To square up the sides & faces of your material. If you're running a piece thru the TS, the jointed edge goes against the fence to insure a straight line cut. To joint both edges, & both faces before the saw truly insures that your board is flat, & square. Which is ideal for the TS. For panel glue ups, I always joint both edges for two reasons. One, it squares up the edges for a more solid glue up. Second, you'll have a smooth, even surface to surface to glue to each other. Which in turn creates a better glue up. As far as your planing goes, I face joint one side, run it through the planer, then edge joint the both edges.

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post #4 of 6 Old 02-14-2016, 01:31 PM
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Running the second edge through your table saw should make a board with parallel edges, good as you can get to work with.

You may want to just skim the edge on your jointer to smooth it up getting rid of any saw marks, depending on your blade and if you will be sanding it or not.

Just be aware that if you take too much or many cuts with the jointer you may end up with a board that does not have parallel edges again, not good to work with.
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post #5 of 6 Old 02-14-2016, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC
Running the second edge through your table saw should make a board with parallel edges, good as you can get to work with. You may want to just skim the edge on your jointer to smooth it up getting rid of any saw marks, depending on your blade and if you will be sanding it or not. Just be aware that if you take too much or many cuts with the jointer you may end up with a board that does not have parallel edges again, not good to work with.
If your table saw was working correctly one very light pass across the jointer is sufficient.
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post #6 of 6 Old 02-14-2016, 02:12 PM
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If you are only gluing two boards one edge on each board is enough. It's only when gluing multiple boards I joint both edges.
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