Easy Way to Remove Pop Rivets??? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 02-14-2017, 09:53 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by JamesTinKS View Post
I'm thinking if you use screws and nuts and then grab (or even come in to contact with) that box with power going through it you will have a good chance of having some electrocution "on-hand".

I'd go with short brass machine or wood screws threaded into the existing holes to keep all the electricity inside the box. Even if epoxy was required to make they stay in place. I'd also add wire rings to the wire ends.

James
Sorry I wasn't more clear. If I used screws, they would be only where the rivets/grommets are, meaning they would be self contained in the plastic (probably Bakelite?) box. Everything would isolated from the user.
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post #22 of 27 Old 02-14-2017, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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... I can't post the enlarged photo here because it's "too large" so you'll just have to trust me, or enlarge the photo on your computer.
Maybe the below will help. It's from the same shot, just cropped/zoomed in. I still had to reduce the resolution to keep the file size down, but otherwise it's a 1-to-1 (100%) crop.


PS: just curious: what is the file size limit? Any width/height constraints?
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post #23 of 27 Old 02-14-2017, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I know there are quite a few types of rivets, and different pop rivets, having used them at one time or another. There's even a "riv nut" or "nutsert" that uses a compression tool to create a nut on the back side of sheet metal in the automotive world. Roof racks and side mirrors on trucks use them where a blind fastener is needed.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/49294296?...tserts&veh=sem

And these:
http://www.aimfasteners.com/about_ri...l#.WKK0qTjkoXg
...
Exactly! I've been in the "mechanical industry" for over 44+ years. About 22 years of that was in the auto and truck side of things. Way back then I kept a system very similar to your second link in my tool box for various quick repairs. Back then, for example, side mirror reattachment was pretty common as they were flimsily held on. Heck, there was even a handful of times I've knock off a customer's mirror just by brushing up against it. Easypeezy fix with a 'rivnut' type of tool :smile3:
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post #24 of 27 Old 02-14-2017, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Correct Nomenclature

Even though I've used the one word phrase "thingy" a lot of times, I do like to know the correct names of 'thingies.' Heck, at one time it was quite a quirk of mine as there's a surprising number of 'mechanics' that don't know the correct names of basic tools. Then, in an industrial setting, one of my side responsibilities was to catalog and make a database of the tooling using in one section. If you had 30 mechanics, there would be 15 different names for the same tool!

Trying to educate everyone to be on the proverbial same page turned out to be a daunting task. Iíve lived coast to coast, and north to south, so for most of life, things were all called the same thing in various parts of the country. But thatís no longer the case. The newer folks have no idea what a real monkey wrench is, for example. Probably since they havenít been made in probably 30-40 years. I can understand that.

But itís getting more and more fuzzy in different ways. For example, take socket wrench adaptors typically used in, oh, the auto industry. The standard convention has ďalwaysĒ been ďfemaleĒ size to ďmaleĒ size. So if you saw a written description of a 3/8Ē to 1/2Ē adaptor, you would instantly know the 3/8Ē would go on the ratchet and the 1/2Ē would be the drive size of the socket (or whatever) that would go on the other end.

But no more. The Ďmajorí manufacturer still use that convention, but there are a surprising number of no-name, and import manufacturers list the male side first! So even tool manufacturers donít agree on what tool is called what.

So, to tie that into the rivet / grommet part of all this, I am currently thinking that in the context of wiring securing, if itís one piece, itís a rivet. If itís two piece itís a grommet. If itís small enough, it could also be called an eyelet.
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post #25 of 27 Old 02-14-2017, 12:17 PM
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there you go ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoRails View Post
........
So, to tie that into the rivet / grommet part of all this, I am currently thinking that in the context of wiring securing, if itís one piece, itís a rivet. If itís two piece itís a grommet. If itís small enough, it could also be called an eyelet.
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an eyelet ....
That's exactly what I was thinking of when I called it a "loop" that was crimped in a circle around the wire. Older motor wiring used them often because they has studs for the connections and all you needed to do was place the eyelet over the stud and put your nut on and tighten it. We now use crimp on spade or round terminals which are easier to do.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #26 of 27 Old 02-14-2017, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoRails View Post
Sorry I wasn't more clear. If I used screws, they would be only where the rivets/grommets are, meaning they would be self contained in the plastic (probably Bakelite?) box. Everything would isolated from the user.
.
Whew. :smile3: From the picture I think it is probably Bakelite as well. It gets brittle as it ages so if you decide to try and tape the holes you will need to go slow. If I were doing this I would probably cut off the head of a machine screw slightly smaller than the hole and epoxy it into the hole. Then use a nut. If possible I would also put eyes on the wire. Might not be enough room in that box. If not then definitely plate, wire, flat washer, star washer, nut.
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post #27 of 27 Old 11-28-2017, 10:34 PM
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I got a couple of Japanese sewing machines on light blocks that need rewiring.

I took apart the light block and noticed that the wires are riveted in place.

I want to know if i can release the 3 rivets and solder on new wires or put screws in the holes and attach clips that are attached to new wires? I can't really save the wires in the light box because they are really brittle and cracking (sleeves not wires).

Can anyone provide advice on the type of wire I should buy? I know I need 18 guage wire, but for Asia/Euro machines should I buy Awg or SWG or SPT-1?
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