Easiest way to cut this board? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:18 AM Thread Starter
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Easiest way to cut this board?

I am using a piece of 3/4" plywood and need to cut these perimeter notches as shown. What are you guys' suggestion as to the least labor intensive way to get this done.

My first thought is to drill holes (OD of the width of a jigsaw blade) at all the inset corners. Clamp a straightedge on the hole center lines as a guide and jigsaw the lengthwise sections. Use same method for inset cross cuts. When I'm done with this, none of these notches will show.

I am hoping there is a more efficient way to do this?
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post #2 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:35 AM
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If you are only doing one you would probably be better off cross cutting the notches on a table saw holding the plywood vertical. Then cut between with a jig saw or bandsaw. If you had a lot of them to do I would make a pattern and cut it out with a router. Plywood wears badly on router bits but it saves on labor.
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post #3 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:36 AM
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Sounds good. Did you mean clamp the straightedge at the outsides of the holes, not centers?
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post #4 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:40 AM
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Make a pattern using Masonite/mdf and a flush cut pattern router bit to cut the notches.
NoThankyou likes this.

Gary
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post #5 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:40 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
If you are only doing one you would probably be better off cross cutting the notches on a table saw holding the plywood vertical. Then cut between with a jig saw or bandsaw. If you had a lot of them to do I would make a pattern and cut it out with a router. Plywood wears badly on router bits but it saves on labor.
Yes, I will be doing many of these. A jig would be an excellent idea but like you said I wold probably go through quite a few router bits. I might be able to build some kind a jig to hold it in place vertically for my table saw as well.

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Last edited by LRM; 06-12-2019 at 10:52 AM.
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post #6 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:41 AM Thread Starter
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Sounds good. Did you mean clamp the straightedge at the outsides of the holes, not centers?
Yes, sorry, I meant on the outside edge of the holes.

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post #7 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by gmercer_48083 View Post
Make a pattern using Masonite/mdf and a flush cut pattern router bit.
That might work for me. Having a pattern/jig so that I could just zip around it would be ideal. Thanks for the tip.

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post #8 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
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I would like to have the inset corners @ 90 degrees for a tighter fit but using a jigsaw or table saw seems to be the only way to do that. I really don't trust myself to hold it upright and run across a table saw. I would have a complete hack-job when I was done I'm afraid, LOL.

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post #9 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 11:09 AM
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I vote for pattern bit and finish with jig saw. In place of jig saw you could use pull saw, but that would be labor intensive.


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post #10 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
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I vote for pattern bit and finish with jig saw. In place of jig saw you could use pull saw, but that would be labor intensive.


George
Thanks George. That is sounding more and more like the best route. I feel that no matter how I do it it's gonna required a good bit of labor. I also have to do the 4 side panels as well they interlock with the floor piece I have shown.

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post #11 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LRM View Post
Yes, I will be doing many of these. A jig would be an excellent idea but like you said I wold probably go through quite a few router bits. I might be able to build some kind a jig to hold it in place vertically for my table saw as well.
You could probably get about 20 boards out of a carbide bit. The amount of labor savings should more than pay for a bit especially if you bought cheap. Use them until they won't cut anymore and pitch them.

What happens is where the glue line is on the plywood it wears a groove in the bit. I used to make some 12" round circles for a customer and used the router to cut them out. I had a template that would cut half the seven circles I could get out of a sheet and then flipped it over and cut it the rest of the way. I used hold down clamps to hold the pieces in place while I routed them.
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post #12 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 12:41 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
You could probably get about 20 boards out of a carbide bit. The amount of labor savings should more than pay for a bit especially if you bought cheap. Use them until they won't cut anymore and pitch them.

What happens is where the glue line is on the plywood it wears a groove in the bit. I used to make some 12" round circles for a customer and used the router to cut them out. I had a template that would cut half the seven circles I could get out of a sheet and then flipped it over and cut it the rest of the way. I used hold down clamps to hold the pieces in place while I routed them.
Thanks Steve. That sounds doable, the cost of bits versus labor is not as bad as I thought. I am only using ply on the bottom and whiteboards for the side panels and ends so that should save on the bits somewhat. I guess I should start making a jig out of MDF as gmercer mentioned.

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post #13 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LRM View Post
Thanks Steve. That sounds doable, the cost of bits versus labor is not as bad as I thought. I am only using ply on the bottom and whiteboards for the side panels and ends so that should save on the bits somewhat. I guess I should start making a jig out of MDF as gmercer mentioned.
MDF is pretty soft for a jig you will be using for a while. The wheels on the bit tend to press into MDF. A jig made out of plywood would be more durable.
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post #14 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 01:14 PM
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Get a sheet or part of a sheet of Baltic birch ply for the template, it will stand up to repeated use.

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post #15 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
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Great! Thank guys, will do.

Do you know if Lowe's sells Baltic Birch Ply?

Zack M.
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post #16 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 01:57 PM
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Baltic birch will be 1'-71/4" too short. They are sheets 5'x5'.
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post #17 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 02:10 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Baltic birch will be 1'-71/4" too short. They are sheets 5'x5'.
I may have to build the template to do one side at a time only.

Zack M.
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post #18 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 05:07 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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outside the box ......

Instead of the cutting the notches, glue/add them on. Set up a jig for spacing them and clamping them, make all the small 3/4" pieces and go for it. The jig would be a larger piece of plywood with rails screwed on around the perimeter and wedges used to force another rail inwards for pressure.






The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #19 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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Instead of the cutting the notches, glue/add them on. Set up a jig for spacing them and clamping them, make all the small 3/4" pieces and go for it. The jig would be a larger piece of plywood with rails screwed on around the perimeter and wedges used to force another rail inwards for pressure.
Very good idea. However, I am just starting to build caskets and need a lot of strength in the bottom and corner joint. I'm not sure I would trust that much weight to glue.

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post #20 of 55 Old 06-12-2019, 05:51 PM
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How deep are the notches?

Gary
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