Dust issues in basement shop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 09-12-2008, 08:57 PM Thread Starter
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Dust issues in basement shop

Hey guys,

My wife and I are looking at purchasing a new home. If we get it, my shop would be in the basement which I like because I wouldn't have to deal with the heating and cooling issues of my current stand alone shop. The downside is that the house has gas forced air heat and a gas water heater. How can I isolate these appliances so that I don't end up with dust blown through the entire house and dust getting in the works of the water heater? Any advice from the rest of you celler dwellers is appreciated.

Ken

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post #2 of 8 Old 09-12-2008, 10:49 PM
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Hey Ken
You could always close that section in by creating their own room. Not forgetting to allow some kind of air to get in. If you use furnace filters for any openings to catch the dust and keep it out heater and duct work. An dust collector I am sure everyone will agree will help cut the dust problem down also.

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post #3 of 8 Old 09-12-2008, 11:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Johnson View Post
Hey guys,

My wife and I are looking at purchasing a new home. If we get it, my shop would be in the basement which I like because I wouldn't have to deal with the heating and cooling issues of my current stand alone shop. The downside is that the house has gas forced air heat and a gas water heater. How can I isolate these appliances so that I don't end up with dust blown through the entire house and dust getting in the works of the water heater? Any advice from the rest of you celler dwellers is appreciated.
I hope you get a ton of good answers. I may be faced with the same situation and hope to keep it as clean as possible. I will be watching closely.
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post #4 of 8 Old 09-13-2008, 12:09 AM
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I'll vote for John's idea. I do have a question. Where is the return air located? I feel sure it's in the house and that's your big worry.
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post #5 of 8 Old 09-13-2008, 12:11 AM
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I would start at the source and put up a wall to isolate your shop from the rest of the house, then ofcourse buy a good dust collector, a air filtration machine, and a dust mask.

Last edited by user4178; 09-13-2008 at 11:12 AM.
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post #6 of 8 Old 09-13-2008, 10:38 AM
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Ken,
I've got a similar situation. A HVAC guy told me not to worry about the furnace. The cold air returns are located upstairs and the air is filtered before being reheated and sent back so you won't have sawdust coming out of your registers.
My water heater sits right beside the furnace and years later has suffered no ill effects. On occasion I give both a blast of air to clean off any sawdust that settles on the flat surfaces.
If you do decide to enclose them make sure you have sufficent air flow to them. Also while it's hard to give upshop space make sure the enclosure is big enough so you have room for any future repairs or replacement.
I did inquire about closing them in when we finished off the basement, a utility closet more than a room, and found my city has a lot of regs to comply with if I did so.
I did build walls that come out 2 feet on either side that are roughly even with the front of the furnace. Handy to hang small stuff from and they are bolted top and bottom, not nailed so they can be removed if need be.

Last edited by JackC; 09-13-2008 at 11:17 AM.
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post #7 of 8 Old 09-13-2008, 12:21 PM
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I have a shop in the basement this is how I have managed. Granted, my shop is in no way a pro/production, nor often used for large projects requiring sizing 8/4 hardwoods. I have a simple shop vac for DC used for TS, Chop saw/router table. Planer and jointer are in garage due to noise and dust. Sanding is minimal, if need be done outside, hand planes are preferred method prior to application of any oil/stain/sealant. Blower to furnace is switched off when making multiple cuts defined by cut list. Furnace is isolated by tarp, allowing breathing room, and blown off when necessary with air gun. Large/production/heavy use shops will require more sophisticated methods.
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Last edited by gusthehonky; 04-25-2011 at 05:25 PM.
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post #8 of 8 Old 09-13-2008, 03:42 PM
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My first shop was in the basement. While I don't think you will ruin your furnace or hot water tank, I wouldn't have another shop in the house. I realize a lot of people do, so this is just my opinion and personal preference. That being said, if I was going to put one in the basement, I would wall it off and seal if off from the rest of the basement. I would install a fresh air intake, separate heat (shouldn't take much to heat a basement space), use a good dust collector and clean up each time you are done. Even when you are careful, dust seems to find its way out of the shop and then throughout the house. Wives don't seem to like this too much. It is nice to be able to just go downstairs and work, but I prefer a separate building. It has taken me about ten years to get mine the way I want it. When I go out there, noise isn't an issue and noone bothers me. My wife calls it the man cave. The other nice thing is not having to carry things up and down stairs. Good luck,
Mike Hawkins
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