which drywall type? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 11-01-2018, 06:24 PM Thread Starter
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which drywall type?

Trying to decide which drywall type to use in my basement. (Mold resistant, moisture resistant, fire resistant.)

Im building a room in the basement. May not be the highest quality but i need to get it done so i dont risk losing the house. (long story). But the room will house my pets who require a room where i can control the temperature.

When i first got this place a year ago, i found out the last owner did a very cheap so called finishing job down there. Which consisted of gluing thin wooden panels right to the cinder block walls. Blocking off ventilation. And a window that didnt open but did leak. Along with some water issues on the other side of the basement. (Not bad, yet. Not a flooding type. More of a slow small leak. But its not something i can take care of right now. I will have to make due.) - So there was a good bit of mold that developed.

I spent the last year cleaning and re cleaning down there. Removing everything and getting it out of the house. Cleaning again. etc. Among other things.

The windows are replaced and i have not seen a single leak from them in the last year. And the side of the basement im building the room has remained dry. - (The small leaking on the other side of the room is still there tho. Cant fix right now.)

So now i have most of my room planned out. More of a make shift temporary room since i cant/dont want to build right up against the cinder block walls yet. So it will be a room in a room. The new rooms walls will be in a couple feet from the cinder block walls. So there will be air flow through there.

But a room in a room means i will need a drywall backing as well as in the room itself. (All that to ask a question -_- )
So im trying to decide which dry wall type to use tho.


Mold resistant. Sounds good considering the past. But it all should be gone now, and im trying to keep it that way.
Moisture resistant. Also sounds good. Maybe better considering the slow leak on the other end of the basement (usually with heavy rain.)
Or fire resistant. Which i hadnt thought of much until now. But the furnace is down there. And one of the rooms walls will be a few feet away from it.








So that is kinda close as well. So im not sure which of the types i should go with.

Last edited by wolfgang953; 11-01-2018 at 06:31 PM.
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post #2 of 14 Old 11-01-2018, 10:20 PM
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Any rock is fire resistant. Anyway unless you were building a furnace room I don't think I would bother with that. Either the moisture resistant or the mold resistant rock should work well. I would just use what ever is cheaper and when you install it hold it an inch or so off the floor so if you do get any leakage the rock won't be sitting in water. Put some kind of PVC trim around the base to cover the gap.
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post #3 of 14 Old 11-02-2018, 05:31 AM
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Builders merchants usually sell corrugated plastic panels to line damp walls. Then can add suitable wall covering. Our bathroom had Aqua board on the wall.

https://chemicalbuildingproducts.co....hoCLaAQAvD_BwE


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post #4 of 14 Old 11-02-2018, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
The new rooms walls will be in a couple feet from the cinder block walls.
this doesn't make sense. you'll get air flow in a 1 inch gap as well as a 2 foot gap

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I would just use what ever is cheaper and when you install it hold it an inch or so off the floor so if you do get any leakage the rock won't be sitting in water.
definitely do this
you can also saw or route a dado in the bottom plate every 2 feet to track when/where you have water coming in

typically water intrusion is a result of poor grading next to the foundation
my current late 1800s home had a wet basement, was listed as a wet basement in the realtors listing
no gutters and railroad tie boarder flower beds all around the house
we removed all the railroad ties, did some minor grading, installed gutters and ran the downspouts 4 feet away from the house
no leaks in the past 20 years, well one leak when i knocked the pipe off the downspout :)
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post #5 of 14 Old 11-02-2018, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by _Ogre View Post
no leaks in the past 20 years, well one leak when i knocked the pipe off the downspout :)
well yea, that could do it' lol

* this section of the basement where the room will be should not see any water. Its usually contained on the other side of the basement. But we all know how things go in life. So im trying to prepare some of it in case there is.

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this doesn't make sense. you'll get air flow in a 1 inch gap as well as a 2 foot gap
misspoke there. Ill have to check another day when i set it all up again to check everything. But i believe its 13.5" off the wall. The final stud ends on a 16c perfectly. So it seemed a good place to stop. It also gives me a little bit of room to maneuver behind the room if i need to. - When the leaking issues are solved, the room will likely get redone on/near the walls anyway.
(Once i get everything figured out, or think i have, ill make a video showing everything along with what im planing to do and why. See if theres anything i missed or overlooked or am wrong on.)

Last edited by wolfgang953; 11-02-2018 at 02:20 PM.
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post #6 of 14 Old 11-03-2018, 03:38 PM Thread Starter
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what about the basement roof? After i put insulation between those joists, ill need something to throw over it. But the joists are fairly low (81"~ off the ground). So i dont think some kind of hanging roof would work. But i also want to be able to remove it if needed for various work (like new electrical or such.)

I was thinking about just putting a thin cross beam over them and attaching a thin and light weight piece of drywall to that. And leaving it like that. I could unscrew any piece i needed and put it back up later if needed.
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post #7 of 14 Old 11-04-2018, 05:37 PM
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But i believe its 13.5" off the wall. The final stud ends on a 16c perfectly. So it seemed a good place to stop.
you need to acquire some framing skills, might as well start here. just frame freestanding walls an inch or 2 off the basement walls. if/when you redo them anything that doesn't need to be redone can stay. just make sure you wire everything to code or better. 16"c-c works fine until you realize your going to have a thin strip of drywall .75 wide on each side. the magic is in the layout, even a simple room can turn into a nightmare if not layed out right

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attaching a thin and light weight piece of drywall to that.
nothing light about drywall. if not securely fastened to rigid supports it will sag and fall off. the thin stuff is way worse to hang, sag and fall. might as well do it right and hope you don't need to tear it down. if you use drywall don't cover over any electrical junction boxes or plumbing valves
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post #8 of 14 Old 11-04-2018, 06:12 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by _Ogre View Post
you need to acquire some framing skills, might as well start here. just frame freestanding walls an inch or 2 off the basement walls. if/when you redo them anything that doesn't need to be redone can stay. just make sure you wire everything to code or better. 16"c-c works fine until you realize your going to have a thin strip of drywall .75 wide on each side. the magic is in the layout, even a simple room can turn into a nightmare if not layed out right
not sure i follow what you mean. The walls with have backing studs in the corner for support, but the main wall studs will be 16c. It should be positioned to let the dry wall sit perfectly on them if put on starting in the center of the first stud. (for an 8ft long board it should take a hair less then 2.5 sheets for the long wall.)


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nothing light about drywall. if not securely fastened to rigid supports it will sag and fall off. the thin stuff is way worse to hang, sag and fall. might as well do it right and hope you don't need to tear it down. if you use drywall don't cover over any electrical junction boxes or plumbing valves
Oh i know its heavy. I just meant one of the thinner 'lighter' sheets as opposed to the thickest ones they have on the market.

Im open to suggestions on this one tho. Alls i need is something to cover it up that can be removed. With insulation in between the roof rafters, i dont want any chance of small pieces falling out and down to where my pets are. They are chewers. Its almost certain they would chew and maybe ingest it if they got there hands on it. So i just need something to cover it to prevent that. - But at the same time, im sure there will be more electrical work over time that needs to be done. If any wires need ran past that area, it would nice to just bring a piece down and put it back up later as opposed to tearing apart a roof. And furthermore the ground to rafter heigh is only around 81" or so. So a drop down roof probably wouldnt work as theres not a whole lot of extra head room.
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post #9 of 14 Old 11-04-2018, 10:01 PM
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Wolfgang---is this the same issue that you started back in July?? Or did you resolve that issue?

I can [B]explain[B] it to you but I cannot Understand it for you
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post #10 of 14 Old 11-04-2018, 11:23 PM Thread Starter
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Wolfgang---is this the same issue that you started back in July?? Or did you resolve that issue?

iv had a lot of issues'


But making this room has been on ongoing plan since iv been on these forums. Iv had some main stuff in the basement to work on over the last.. forever.. So iv been slowly planning out just want i wanted to down there; checking out options and such, while i finish all that stuff up. So iv been reading a lot and watching videos and checking things out. - Then i ask questions here if im not sure about something, or just want to see other ppls opinions on things or see if other ppl have knowledge or suggestions that i have missed; etc.
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post #11 of 14 Old 11-07-2018, 01:02 AM Thread Starter
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anyone have any suggestions for a 'roof' on the basement rafters? Just need something to block off any pieces of insulation from falling down to the animal cages.

Right now the best idea i got is putting some 1 bys or such across and attaching the 'lightest' drywall i can find to it (or just drywall). But as oger said.. its still not lite


(floor to roof rafters is only 81~ inchs so cant have anything hanging or to low)
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post #12 of 14 Old 11-07-2018, 03:42 AM
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Can they climb?

To cover the roof opening I would just use plywood. Drywall is heavy and will sag if unsupported. Put thin plywood down, then place 2 X 4's on top at 24" intervals. Screw up from the bottom into the 2 X 4's and it will support and stiffen the plywood. Use 1/4" or 3/8" thick plywood. By putting the 2 X 4" on top there iare no holes on the ends for them to climb out, the roof is flat on the inside.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 14 Old 11-12-2018, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
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** new question

since this will be a room in a room, i have to cover both the front and the back of the framing. Unfortunately, some of the funding i was planning on is not an option. So some areas i need to cut back or down grade to save some money (****ty, but necessary for now).

For the backing of the frame walls (the part that will be between the frame and the cinder block wall itself; not inside the room) is it safe to use something else as a backing instead of drywall? so i have something holding the insulation in.
If i could do that it would cut the drywall needed in half.
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post #14 of 14 Old 11-13-2018, 02:41 AM
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** new question

For the backing of the frame walls (the part that will be between the frame and the cinder block wall itself; not inside the room) is it safe to use something else as a backing instead of drywall? so i have something holding the insulation in.
If i could do that it would cut the drywall needed in half.

I don't know about your area, but here, drywall is just about the least expensive covering you could use, unless you just used a plastic dropcloth sheet and stapled it on. Or went to an appliance store and asked for refrigerator boxes and stapled the cardboard on.
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