cutting the stick in cabinet doors - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 01:10 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3
View charliesam53's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via AIM to charliesam53
cutting the stick in cabinet doors

When cutting the stick cut when making a door frame how can I stop the wood from tearing out along the profile edge? I have tried to make it in two passes but I still get bad tearout right where you can see it, will be on the front of the door when assembled. The wood I am using is red oak.
charliesam53 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 01:34 AM
Old Methane Gas Cloud
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 3,500
View rrich's Photo Album My Photos
Red oak is tough.

The secret is to cut two pieces at once. Use the second piece (scrap?) as a backer for the first. After you get the first piece past the center of the router bit bearing just pull both pieces out of the cut. The backer prevents the split out.

Use a push pad to hold both pieces together, against the fence and down against the table.

A miter gauge of some sort (in a track on the table or attached to the fence) is almost mandatory. Another trick is to use about a 6" square piece of plywood with a handle as a push stick. You can chew up the edge of the plywood and not use the scrap backer. However then you'll need a plywood square for every different bit that you use to cut end grain.

I would not try climb cutting for this type of routing cut. A climb cut for this type of cut is very dangerous and red oak would make it only worse.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
rrich is offline  
post #3 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 09:20 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3
View charliesam53's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via AIM to charliesam53
Thank you so much for your reply to my post. However you are talking about the cope cut on the end of the rail. I am refering to the cut along the stile where the cut is with the long grain, it just chips out no matter what I do.
charliesam53 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 09:48 AM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 5,010
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
Charlie,
Have you tried making multiple passes instead of cutting it in one pass? I have had that problem with oak. It seems like it depends on the direction of the grain, which you don't have any control over. The only other thing I can think of is make sure your cutters are sharp and maybe try different feed rates without burning the edge.
Mike Hawkins
firehawkmph is offline  
post #5 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 09:55 AM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by charliesam53 View Post
When cutting the stick cut when making a door frame how can I stop the wood from tearing out along the profile edge? I have tried to make it in two passes but I still get bad tearout right where you can see it, will be on the front of the door when assembled. The wood I am using is red oak.
Hi Charlie - Red oak can be a . About all I can offer is the obvious: new/sharp bit, run with the grain, reduce speed some, make cut in 3 or 4 passes, make final pass a very light one..
Good luck

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
jschaben is offline  
post #6 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3
View charliesam53's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via AIM to charliesam53
Thank you all so much for your help, I will keep trying.

Charlie
charliesam53 is offline  
post #7 of 9 Old 08-29-2011, 11:47 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Maine
Posts: 1,932
View Hammer1's Photo Album My Photos
Here is a picture of red oak. The pencil points to the grain which shows as short brown hash marks, it's not the same as the annual growth rings that many folks call the grain. In the pic, the grain runs opposite the growth rings. If you were feeding this piece into a router bit, you would feed the end towards the pencil eraser first. An easy way to know grain direction is to cut a sliver off the edge with a utility knife. In one direction the knife will grab and chip out, in the other direction it should cut a continuous sliver.

Grain is more easily seen by sighting down the length of the board. Some species are easier to see than others. Often, boards may have grain going in two directions. Figured lumber like birds eye maple have grain going 360 around each eye. When laying out your pieces for a project, you try to identify the prevailing grain and think ahead as to how each piece will be run on cutting tools, not only routers but jointers, planers, hand planes, etc. Cutters need to be sharp. Don't be afraid to make multiple shallow passes, particularly with a router. It may take 5 or 6 incremental cuts to reduce/eliminate blow out, especially on species like oak that tend to splinter.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	red oak grain.jpg
Views:	265
Size:	70.4 KB
ID:	28172  

Hammer1 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Hammer1 For This Useful Post:
charliesam53 (08-29-2011)
post #8 of 9 Old 09-05-2011, 10:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 576
View Midlandbob's Photo Album My Photos
The little brown lines especially prominent in oak are the cross section of rays. Rays are the transport elements of trees that are perpendicular to the major fibers of the wood. They are the elements that are highlighted by quarter cutting the oak so the cuts are along the rays instead of perpendicular.
Do a search for ray fleck and you should find a wikipedia entry.
Incidentally the ray fleck in oak is the best way to distinguish oak from ash that was often used as a substitute for oak in trim work ( poor mans oak).
Midlandbob is offline  
post #9 of 9 Old 09-06-2011, 08:19 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
It sounds like you're running the stock against the grain. Wood is like a group of drinking straws. If you point the straws toward the cutter they will grab and tear. If you point them down it will nicely cut the ends off. Another thing that might help is to firmly feather the stock down. Any vibration will only add to the problem. Some boards you can't help running them against the grain at one end or another.
Steve Neul is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First cope and stick routed doors. jkristia General Woodworking Discussion 10 08-23-2011 12:45 PM
Cutting bands around wood stick/dowel? millennium3 General Woodworking Discussion 3 11-13-2010 01:51 AM
Cabinet Doors dwendt1978 General Woodworking Discussion 6 04-03-2010 12:29 AM
Cabinet doors Itchy Brother Project Showcase 4 02-27-2010 12:34 PM
Small Cope & Stick Doors Problem bkallen5 General Woodworking Discussion 7 08-24-2007 01:23 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome