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post #1 of 20 Old 12-17-2015, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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cutting board

I'm going to go ahead and ask this and take my tongue lashing. I know it can be done because I've done it. I have a PINE cutting board in my kitchen that all we do is set cups on. is it cool to make a cutting/serving/cheese cutting board/tray from pine? I have an abundance of pine that's dry. I'm looking into oak logs to saw and dry but for now this is what I have. thanks
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post #2 of 20 Old 12-17-2015, 11:10 PM
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What are your asking?
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post #3 of 20 Old 12-17-2015, 11:28 PM
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Pine is very soft. It will get beat up in no time.
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post #4 of 20 Old 12-18-2015, 12:03 AM Thread Starter
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so I reckon I should use hardwood like oak. Sure was hoping pine would work
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post #5 of 20 Old 12-18-2015, 12:33 AM
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so I reckon I should use hardwood like oak. Sure was hoping pine would work
Oak is not a good choice either. The grain is too pours. Hard maple would be the best choice, but nearly anything would be better than oak or pine.
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post #6 of 20 Old 12-18-2015, 06:02 AM
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Pine is fine, as others stated, it's soft, so cutting on it is going to likely mark it up, but if you like it, then it should be just fine.
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post #7 of 20 Old 12-18-2015, 08:26 PM Thread Starter
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so theres nothing wrong with the pine other than its soft and itll get marked up easy?
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post #8 of 20 Old 12-18-2015, 08:33 PM
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A lot of people poo poo pine because it's so soft. Putting a lot of effort into a project and then it denting easily could be frustrating. Most of my projects are rustic or worn looking to start with so a few more dents for me just add to the character. I have an abundance of pine so that's what most my projects are made from. I love them as do my customers.

wish I had a cool line like everyone else...
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post #9 of 20 Old 12-18-2015, 10:43 PM
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Pine is fine as long as you don't want it to last forever.

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post #10 of 20 Old 12-19-2015, 08:59 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by michaelpugh View Post
A lot of people poo poo pine because it's so soft. Putting a lot of effort into a project and then it denting easily could be frustrating. Most of my projects are rustic or worn looking to start with so a few more dents for me just add to the character. I have an abundance of pine so that's what most my projects are made from. I love them as do my customers.
do you have a website? id like to see some pictures of some of your projects
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post #11 of 20 Old 12-19-2015, 11:55 PM
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https://www.facebook.com/WEATHEREDWOODFURNITURE/

wish I had a cool line like everyone else...
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post #12 of 20 Old 12-20-2015, 12:19 AM
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I made a hickory end grain cutting board. That sucker was heavy and HARD. My drum sander with 80 grit hated it and, and my hand held belt sander with 80 grit barley fazed it. I used 80 grit on the ROS for the final sanding, and it was smooth as glass with no visible scratches. I usually sand end grain boards to 150, but it wasn't necessary for this one.

Last edited by hwebb99; 12-20-2015 at 12:21 AM.
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post #13 of 20 Old 12-20-2015, 10:12 PM
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Dang it - you're in the "other" Fayetteville! Great looking work.
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post #14 of 20 Old 12-29-2015, 09:50 PM
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I have used long leaf pine cutting boards in my kitchen for years now they are just fine. Sure they where but it's not like I'm em barest of them. Worst case I will throw them out ( or burn them in my fire place) but the price is right and they are fun to use. They are made out of bleacher seats from a old high school.
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post #15 of 20 Old 01-06-2016, 02:50 PM
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I like the look of hickory. Would using a finish help?
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post #16 of 20 Old 01-06-2016, 05:03 PM
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I like the look of hickory. Would using a finish help?
If it's going to be in contact with food, you'll want something food safe like mineral oil. That's not going to help with hardness.

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post #17 of 20 Old 01-06-2016, 10:05 PM
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With any cutting board you need to be concerned with bacteria buildup on the board. The softer the wood, the easier it is deformed with use. The more cuts, dents etc to the wood, the higher the chance of bacteria being given a place to grow. I have made dozens of cutting boards over the years and I recommend the hardest wood you can find.
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post #18 of 20 Old 01-16-2016, 09:10 AM
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The ramifications of not using a harder wood is
1) your knifes can dull faster, it's actually cutting the wood
2) Bacteria can form in the soft wood debts and cuts and hard to clean
3) water will distort the wood over time and most likely come apart
4) pine is too light weight, a cutting board should be fairly heavy to prevent shifting around while using


Take a look on YouTube for a cutting board maker by the name of MTMwood, the guy is a master at cutting board making. You can learn all the tricks to make one. Commonly he will use walnut, maple, Purple Heart for his wood choices. The other important item is using tight bond III glue I believe. Only 1 tightbond glue is food safe.

Happy wood working!
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post #19 of 20 Old 01-17-2016, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Pcride View Post
The ramifications of not using a harder wood is
1) your knifes can dull faster, it's actually cutting the wood
2) Bacteria can form in the soft wood debts and cuts and hard to clean
3) water will distort the wood over time and most likely come apart
4) pine is too light weight, a cutting board should be fairly heavy to prevent shifting around while using


Take a look on YouTube for a cutting board maker by the name of MTMwood, the guy is a master at cutting board making. You can learn all the tricks to make one. Commonly he will use walnut, maple, Purple Heart for his wood choices. The other important item is using tight bond III glue I believe. Only 1 tightbond glue is food safe.

Happy wood working!
Titebond II is also food safe
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post #20 of 20 Old 01-19-2016, 03:52 PM
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Okay, I know what I'm about to say could be controversial and the topic seems to pop up from time to time. But bacterial contamination is not any worse on a wooden surface (cutting board) than it is on a plastic one. I have seen studies that show wooden boards actually are less likely to be bacterial problems. If you google the issue you can see studies supporting both positions. Here is what I know for fact....Wooden utensils and cutting surfaces have been used by humans since... well who the hell knows how long and the species is still here. Butcher shops used to have boards that didn't get replaced for decades. I have made cutting boards out of all kinds of woods including pine. You're fine. As was mentioned it will not last as long as a soft wood board but it's also a lot cheaper so give and take right? I don't prefer pine boards because some foods pick up a pine taste from them. If you are concerned with bacteria there are plenty of ways to disinfect them. Vinegar for instance. But I feel it is totally unnecessary. My feeling is that this is a problem that the plastic cutting board manufacturers invented. Just me. I know others will feel different.
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