curved molding for stair base - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 11-22-2011, 11:06 AM Thread Starter
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curved molding for stair base

Hi I would like to make a curved molding to finish off a stairway base which has a maple floor next to it. How do I do this please? Thanks.

PS I tried to upload a picture - no luck. I don't see an attachment option of the menu only a 'manage attachments' at the bottom. Can you help please.
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post #2 of 17 Old 11-22-2011, 11:21 AM
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WELCOME Keenbeginer

The attachment option yer lookin for is the little paper clip icon in the tool bar next to the smiley face icon

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post #3 of 17 Old 11-22-2011, 02:20 PM
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You can cut the outside radius with a router then run your profile. You can cut the inside radius with a saber saw or you could cut it with the router if you are really careful.

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post #4 of 17 Old 11-23-2011, 05:05 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943 View Post
You can cut the outside radius with a router then run your profile. You can cut the inside radius with a saber saw or you could cut it with the router if you are really careful.
Thanks. Right now all I have to do if I understand you right jiju is to make a template, copy it onto a piece of wood deep enough to take the curve of the stair and then saw it into the shape of the template?

(My picture upload failed again. I may have to change format or something like that).
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post #5 of 17 Old 11-23-2011, 02:34 PM
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Many times the radius will be in two or more pieces as it takes some pretty hefty sized wood to make it in one piece.

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post #6 of 17 Old 11-23-2011, 09:33 PM
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Tom silva showed how to do this on ask this old house. Try a search on the web site.
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post #7 of 17 Old 11-24-2011, 01:35 AM
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What is the radius and how big is the molding you are trying to make? Are you trying to match something?

I would stack segments on a plywood disk that I would pre-cut to the finished outside diameter. Use paper between the plywood and your molding workpiece so you can separate them later. Screw this to your lathe faceplate on the outbaord side and turn the profile on the molding to match whatever using your turning tools.

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post #8 of 17 Old 11-24-2011, 02:05 AM
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If you don't want to make the molding you can buy it already made at a trim supply company. The upper trim under the tread usually is a scotia mold and the lower trim is usually a shoe mold and sometimes can be a 1/4 round. Neither of then are hard to make.

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post #9 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 02:18 AM
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It sounds like your are talking about a cove mold on a volute box. Jiju is right about it probably having to be multiple pieces. If you did manage to get it in one piece you would also have to worry about the grain, trying not to crack it when you nail it. You can also use a flex mold that is the same or similar detail, but it can be tricky to stain it to look the same as real wood.

Check out some of my custom stairs
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post #10 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treeoflifestairs.com View Post
If you did manage to get it in one piece you would also have to worry about the grain, trying not to crack it when you nail it. You can also use a flex mold that is the same or similar detail, but it can be tricky to stain it to look the same as real wood.
These flex molds work very well!!! But If you would like an advanced technique steam bend the molding to the radius...But if you don't know how to find the radius Im assuming you might have a hard time with steam bending.


Show us a pic and we can help you more.
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post #11 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 12:29 PM
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These flex molds work very well!!! But If you would like an advanced technique steam bend the molding to the radius...But if you don't know how to find the radius Im assuming you might have a hard time with steam bending.


Show us a pic and we can help you more.
You can also bend with Anhydrous Ammonia, just a little more complicated.

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post #12 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 12:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943

You can also bend with Anhydrous Ammonia, just a little more complicated.
Eh?

My curiosity is peaked

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post #13 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 01:01 PM
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Eh?

My curiosity is peaked

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Tom back when I was doing some pretty tough hand rails that had to be hand made I looked into bending and found out about bending with ammonia but the SS tanks and equipment is expensive and the Anhydrous Ammonia is hazardous, here is a link to do some reading about it if you like. Scroll down to the part about chemical bending.
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Anhydr...od.-a020133971

I just didn't take the time to try cutting the wreath block parts so I heated, clamped and laminated most of my hard parts.

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Last edited by BigJim; 01-10-2012 at 01:04 PM.
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post #14 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiju1943

Tom back when I was doing some pretty tough hand rails that had to be hand made I looked into bending and found out about bending with ammonia but the SS tanks and equipment is expensive and the Anhydrous Ammonia is hazardous, here is a link to do some reading about it if you like. Scroll down to the part about chemical bending.
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Anhydr...od.-a020133971

I just didn't take the time to try cutting the wreath block parts so I heated, clamped and laminated most of my hard parts.
Very interesting. You go buying aa here and your either a farmer or running a meth lab, lol

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post #15 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 04:54 PM
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If the moulding you are referring to is under the first tread below the newel, you could attach waxed paper to the riser, and cut thin strips of your wood (1/8" or less), and tack the first strip to the riser. Using handscrew clamps add succeeding strips with the clamp pushing against the last strip that was glued. When you are done with the build, when dry, just pull off the riser, and then you can profile the lamination.

Or, make a paper template of the radius, and transfer it to solid wood and cut the curve. You should have this in sections and can be scarf glued, and profiled.

Or, this is a procedure to make curved moulding, that is of any profile. If what you want is larger or longer than the solid stock you have, or it's too much to make it out of solid stock, this might work for you. I came up with this method many years ago out of necessity, with excellent results. The idea with this is you will be needing two (2) lengths of identical moulding "A" and "B", to make curved piece "C". Keep in mind this is a lamination method and the final moulding will have varied grain due to it being laminated from two different pieces of wood.

As you see in the drawings, "C" is cut to be glued up and installed along its left side. You can start with buying two identical pieces of moulding or make them. The drawings for this explanation are segmented into 1/8" sections, to facilitate the use of an 1/8" kerf cut. Most woods will bend well in 1/8" thickness. Each segment of "A" and "B" represent a "save" or "saw kerf".

The cross hatched segments represent a "saw kerf". So, after slicing on the TS the segments of both "A" and "B", you will save the segments "a" from "B", "b" from "A", "c" from "B", "d" from "A", etc, for the rest of the profile.

When you have the "saved" segments they will get glued up to form "C" moulding. They can be glued up and clamped all at once or a few at a time. It's imperative to align the moulding up so the profile will be consistent.

Taller curves can be created by just vertically stacking one or more profiles, provided you have made forms for the moulding to glue to. Segments that are covered by another segment can be pin nailed if necessary.
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post #16 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 08:04 PM
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Very interesting. You go buying aa here and your either a farmer or running a meth lab, lol

~tom. ...GEAUX TIGERS!... ...GEAUX SAINTS!......
You are right, I didn't think about that.

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post #17 of 17 Old 01-10-2012, 10:05 PM
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Cabinet man very interesting technique the first sentence I read I knew where u were going with the laminating...I will have to keep that in my bag o' tricks
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