Curly / Tiger Maple stock for AR style rifle - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 12:06 PM Thread Starter
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Curly / Tiger Maple stock for AR style rifle

My apologies if this fits better in a different section. As mentioned in my introduction thread, I'm currently working on a stock for an AR build, and my biggest question so far is how do I deal with natural cracks?. I would much rather DIY than purchase off the shelf, and I love wood. So when I started to get parts for my new AR build, I thought to myself, I have all this great wood collected, I can make my own stock for this build.

In reality, I only had 2 viable options for a stock build, 9/4 Curly Maple or 10/4 Honduran Rosewood. If I went the Rosewood route, I would have to laminate 2 pieces together since it is only 2.3in x 2.7in x 6.8ft. The Curly Maple on the other hand is 1.9in x 12.2in x 46.4in for one piece, and 2in x 12.3in x 56in for the other piece. So, after a quick trip to the miter saw with the Maple, I had enough for 2 blanks, one to practice on, and one for the finished piece.


I cut a 10in x 12.3in piece off of the longer board, then cut that into two 5in x 12.3in pieces. I put an 80 tooth blade on the 12" miter saw & cut a nice smooth flat bottom for a starting point, then I clamped it down long ways with the new flat bottom against the fence & gave myself one 90 degree edge longways. I then measured my rifle length buffer tube on my 308, & ordered a Forstner bit that was about 0.12mm smaller than the diameter.

So here's my first photo of the one I'm working on and the better blank for the final piece. I also did a test finish using "Dark Walnut Danish Oil"


Once the Forstner bit arrived I had already chosen the worst of the two pieces to start with, and had marked out where to put the hole for the buffer tube, so it was just a matter of taking my time to carefully drill out the pocket to fit the buffer tube. To reach the finished size I used adhesive backed 80 grit sand paper on an oak dowel with one end trimmed down to fit into my drill and enlarged the pocket till the tube just began to go in without forcing it. I then moved to 220 grit and continued working it till it went all the way in without trouble and without extra play!!!

Buffer Tube Pocket

YES, it is offset a little bit to give more material on the cheek side of the stock.

Next I went over to my bandsaw and cut out a rough shape for the stock. I drew a center line on the under side to ensure I could maintain a nice straight line in the finished stock, and got to work on my 1" belt sander with 40 grit. Unfortunately I had not thought to take any pictures of my progress until after I had a bit of progress on the belt sander...

Each side after some sanding work.



I then continued to work the stock on the belt sander, eventually working my way through 80, 120, 180, 240, and 320 grits as I shaped the stock. I already knew that I had a crack in the blank from the start, and although I got rid of the worst crack on the bandsaw, I couldn't get rid of the other. After all the sanding the initial crack had shrunk a bit, but another crack was revealed.

After final belt sanding: compared to Magpul MOE Rifle length stock


And test fit on the 308 lower



And my biggest reason for coming here: Crack #1 - about an inch and 5/8 long


Cracks 2&3, top is about 1 1/8", bottom about 1/2" long



So we get to that question, how do I deal with these cracks? Is there anything I can do that will not cause problems when apply a finish? Should I just get one of those scratch filler crayon thingies & fill them in as best I can? I cannot tell how deep they go, but they don't appear to go all the way to the buffer tube pocket, as a 1000 lumen light inside does not show up through the cracks.

Even though this one will not be the final use product, I would still like it to be fully functional. Being on a .223 and with the buffer tube taking the brunt of the force, I don't imagine there will be any problems with the cracks opening up under stress. But it's still something I would like to know how to deal with in the future.

Here's a weight comparison between the Magpul & my build, though I still have about 1/8" of overall thickness to be removed from the stock, and I can drill pockets in the base to further reduce weight.
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post #2 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 01:06 PM
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That's looking really nice! When I get cracks like that I usually use some of the sanding dust from the same wood and mix in with some epoxy. Mix the epoxy first and then add the sanding dust. Try it on a test piece to get the color right. Sometimes it looks darker, sometimes it looks lighter, so you may have to mix in some Walnut dust or use less of the same wood dust, just whatever it takes to get the color close. It's always going to show but you can lessen how much it shows.

I'm surprised by the weight. That's fairly close to the other stock.

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post #3 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 05:59 PM
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filling cracks with super glue

Here's one of many You Tube videos:

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post #4 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 06:14 PM
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Nice work, and I look forward to seeing how your "final" blank turns out as that's a beautiful piece of wood.

For cracks that size, I'd use thin or possibly medium CA glue. If you want to take the time to blend it as best as possible, take some 400 grit sandpaper and sand a scrap piece to get very fine sawdust. Rub that into the crack as best as possible, then use thin CA over it. The thin CA will soak into the crack and mix with the sawdust to get it sealed and blended fairly well.
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post #5 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosdsm View Post
My apologies if this fits better in a different section. As mentioned in my introduction thread, I'm currently working on a stock for an AR build, and my biggest question so far is how do I deal with natural cracks?. I would much rather DIY than purchase off the shelf, and I love wood. So when I started to get parts for my new AR build, I thought to myself, I have all this great wood collected, I can make my own stock for this build.

And my biggest reason for coming here: Crack #1 - about an inch and 5/8 long


Cracks 2&3, top is about 1 1/8", bottom about 1/2" long



So we get to that question, how do I deal with these cracks? Is there anything I can do that will not cause problems when apply a finish? Should I just get one of those scratch filler crayon thingies & fill them in as best I can? I cannot tell how deep they go, but they don't appear to go all the way to the buffer tube pocket, as a 1000 lumen light inside does not show up through the cracks.

Even though this one will not be the final use product, I would still like it to be fully functional. Being on a .223 and with the buffer tube taking the brunt of the force, I don't imagine there will be any problems with the cracks opening up under stress. But it's still something I would like to know how to deal with in the future.

Here's a weight comparison between the Magpul & my build, though I still have about 1/8" of overall thickness to be removed from the stock, and I can drill pockets in the base to further reduce weight.
If you want a..."visible"...modern "plastic" repair of the cracks a CA or epoxy is standard now days...and probably most common...?!?

If you want a blemish "micro check" or "fissure" like that in a piece of wood to completely disappear and be rendered thus, you will need to do a tradtional repair (not really that difficult at all) called a "slivering"...or..."birding," (which is nice too but actully is clearly visible.) Both the terms were used by my family in there work like this and I have heard bantered around over the years by other "real" historic furniture restorations...

Let me know what path you wish to go down and I can expand on "plastics" or "tradtional" depending on your goals...

j
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post #6 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 11:01 PM
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I have one concern....where is this located at???? in the wrong spot it won't matter what repair you do it could snap. Location DOES matter with this!!!
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post #7 of 32 Old 02-18-2019, 11:51 PM
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I have one concern....where is this located at???? in the wrong spot it won't matter what repair you do it could snap. Location DOES matter with this!!!
Agreed...

It is an indication of potential "reaction wood" within the section. These types of interstitial stress, particularly in a piece that would be used within a gun stock, should be considered for placement.
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post #8 of 32 Old 02-19-2019, 10:08 AM
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I found this by accident ....

Other searches brought this one up and it's appropriate for this thread as far as filling stock cracks. Other aspects are really interesting as well and the finished product is beautiful. For owners of older firearms and some woodworking skills:
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post #9 of 32 Old 02-19-2019, 08:13 PM
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Sorry...not a restoration...

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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Other searches brought this one up and it's appropriate for this thread as far as filling stock cracks. Other aspects are really interesting as well and the finished product is beautiful. For owners of older firearms and some woodworking skills:
Gunsmithing - Repairing a Remington Model 11 Gunstock - YouTube
I saw some great skills as a "Gunsmith" and some methods applicable to a "modern weapon" for sure! I didn't like the "advertising" by pushing the "repair kit" nor the fact that this was called a "restoration" of a weapon over 100 years old...!!!... and he did modifications that are neither "reversible" nor applicable for that time period.

Any "serious collectors" of vintage firearms I have worked for or with would have a fit if "epoxy!!!" or other modern glues ever got used on one of their weapons...Nor would changing the original patina and stock modifications go over very well...That knocked down "collector value" by some significant margin.

There is a spectrum among collectors and restoration experts, not only of antique furniture realm, but any vintage artifact of any kind...I can say for certain that if I did work like in this video on a museums weapon, I would not only be out of a job, I would probably be "black listed" as well...However, for an average "Gun Shop" that just does "good repairs" of brought in weapons not ever considered for their historic value...just intrinsic use...this is about par for the course...

It...IS NOT..."restoration"...!!!...nor even good "conservation" practices of a firearm...

Some of the modalities are indeed germane to the possible repair of the OP's wood for his stock if "plastic repair" is acceptable to him for his AR...
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post #10 of 32 Old 02-20-2019, 11:36 AM
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wow, I had no idea ca could be used like shown in that video, especially with those results!
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post #11 of 32 Old 02-20-2019, 06:01 PM
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Jay, I'm confused by your title...

QUOTING: Sorry .....Not a restoration .....


The title of the You tube is:


The video never claimed this to be a "restoration" so I don't understand your points at all. It was simply showing how to "repair" the cracks on the stock and forearm in several places and including the interface of the action and the buttstock where there was a gap which could cause a failure and a potentially serious injury. There were 850,000 of these guns made so it was hardly of historical significance and probably more like a family "heirloom" to be passed along to succeeding generations, who would safely use it and not to be "laid to rest in a museum".


The practices of gluing the cracks would certainly be useful to the OP if it's possible to use those methods. The other method I found appropriate for a new but slightly cracked stock, was the CA method.
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post #12 of 32 Old 02-20-2019, 08:23 PM
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...The video never claimed this to be a "restoration" so I don't understand your points at all...There were 850,000 of these guns made so it was hardly of historical significance and probably more like a family "heirloom" to be passed along to succeeding generations, who would safely use it and not to be "laid to rest in a museum".
Confused or don't agree?

There is a difference...but I appreciate the candor and question nonetheless..thank you...

It is an old artifact (what it is doesn't really matter to folks like me). The quantity also does not matter, one or a million does not change proper practice in "repairing," vintage items of any kind. The fact that it most likely is an "family heirloom," is all the more reason to treat the item with the proper respect it deserves within context of its age and value...

I would also add that just because guns are in museums and/or collects does not meat many of them are not still shot or capable of being shot...

This very post came up today at lunch and I describe exactly what was done. I got confused looks...and the most poignant questions/comment was...

"...I'm confused...???...they didn't actually do that to a real shotgun of that age did they?...
Case in point, that is a devaluation even though it might have been technically excellent and proficient, its not something many of us would do...just like the "antique restorers" that are out there all over this country. You see the signs hanging everywhere advertising the work, but seldom is it within the proper context of what the actually standards are for working on such items. Too many are greatly damaged by such action with not only the loss of history but their intrinsic and fiscal value as well...

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...It was simply showing how to "repair" the cracks on the stock and forearm in several places and including the interface of the action and the buttstock where there was a gap which could cause a failure and a potentially serious injury.
I am fully aware of what it "was" trying to show...and technically an excellent repair by a talented "Gunsmith"...but only germane for a modern firearm...not a vintage one AT ALL!!!

As for "failure" or causing a "potentially serious injury," why would you believe that proper restoration by the standards I offered in my previous post wouldn't render the weapon usable? That is not only a false assumption, it rather silly, don't you think?

Most of the Rifles and Pistols I shot as a kid (my Uncles) all where over a 100 years in age, or quite a few 3 times that age or more!!! German to this conversation was the "Goose Gun" as it was called...(I don't no the make or model other than very old) and several percussion rifles worth more than some houses...All got shot and many hunted with...All had been restored, many more than once...If a stock or grip was "delicate," it was swapped out before going into the field for a day of hunting...Sometimes barrels too got exchanged...

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...The practices of gluing the cracks would certainly be useful to the OP if it's possible to use those methods. The other method I found appropriate for a new but slightly cracked stock, was the CA method.
Agreed...and for a modern weapon, if plastic resins are wanted that's fine for this weapon, but there are alternatives just as good for such small blemishes...Assuming (as Tim pointed out) these don't go deeper or are not in a critical location when fabrication is completed...
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post #13 of 32 Old 02-20-2019, 08:52 PM
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So, you would have done what ....?

What would have been your approach to "repairing" this firearm ... in 14 paragraphs or less?
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post #14 of 32 Old 02-20-2019, 10:01 PM
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What would have been your approach to "repairing" this firearm ... in 14 paragraphs or less?
Actually Woodnthings...it would be easy for me and actually (I think?) fun for you...!!!...

If you brought me that very shotgun, I would have stripped it down to all its parts (assuming you knew nothing about it) and/or taken it to one my friends and would have done that with them...

Once I knew all the original parts were in good operating order and functionally serviceable, I would (if I hadn't already?) checked in with one of my colleagues more qualified than I to make sure the "mechanics" where in good order...

As for what the Gentlemen did in the video...that was simply wrong!!!!...in my professional opinion...

He completely erased the history (and patina!!!!) of a vintage piece. There was no need to do any of that to the gun...It's part of it history!!!

If you said you would like to hunt with that weapon, then I would have done exactly what museums (or my Uncle...a Gunsmith) would have done and either made (or have you make) all new wood assemblies for the gun, and maybe even a new barrel as well to keep the original in good order...

Then you get to "have your cake...and eat it too!!!"

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post #15 of 32 Old 02-20-2019, 11:22 PM
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I, for one, could care less about that gun being old. If I owed that shotgun in the condition it was in I would have performed the same repair procedures shown in the video. I am more interested in a good looking, good working hunting gun not its patina.

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post #16 of 32 Old 02-21-2019, 12:05 AM
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It is a common viewpoint to be sure...



Sorry OP but worth noting and responding...

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I, for one, could care less about that gun being old. If I owed that shotgun in the condition it was in I would have performed the same repair procedures shown in the video. I am more interested in a good looking, good working hunting gun not its patina.
I suppose that is a valid perspective......and one I encounter all to often and have seen many times with piece of antiquity that folks could..."care less about"..."being old."

It is an individual choice......to be sure.

I would suggest however, that it is on a spectrum between complacency toward history, and ignorance of it or its value...

As germane to WoodnThings shared video and your very perspective with the quoted comment above, it is a travesty easily avoided without much effort other than a reconsideration or perhaps a deeper understanding?

A vintage gun can (as I shared) still be used if one wishes to, as my Uncle did with many within his collection, and persevering history...and value as well...all at the same time...

I also don't think you would be too happy with taking a weapon that can be worth thousands being rendered "valued at cost in rendered condition" because of a pore decisions with erasing of its specific history...

With such augmentations (as reflected in the video) and/or alteration items like this gun (and many antiques) are rendered worthless by such inappropriate and aggressive interventions...all of which is clearly avoidable without any great effort...

But you are correct...most "could care less about that gun being old," or most "old things" in general for that matter...
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post #17 of 32 Old 02-21-2019, 03:56 AM
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Quote:
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I, for one, could care less about that gun being old. If I owed that shotgun in the condition it was in I would have performed the same repair procedures shown in the video. I am more interested in a good looking, good working hunting gun not its patina.
Im with you on that one. For one, thats hardly a particularly valuable or rare gun, that model was produced from 1949 to 1968, and its biggest claim to fame is it was mass-produced with stamped steel parts for cost saving. Half a million of them around, and you can walk out right now and pick one up right now for ~$400. Hardly a historical piece, let alone museum quality, and a full on museum quality restoration is overkill. Thats kinda like breaking out the cotton gloves and magnifying glasses to fix up an AK, hardly makes sense

Also, point of interest, epoxy resins were first created in the 1930's, so for a gun made in the 50's, so it would indeed be applicable for the time period, especially given that again, the model 11 was a mass-produced stamped steel firearm

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post #18 of 32 Old 02-21-2019, 09:02 AM
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You got your numbers wrong

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Im with you on that one. For one, thats hardly a particularly valuable or rare gun, that model was produced from 1949 to 1968, and its biggest claim to fame is it was mass-produced with stamped steel parts for cost saving. Half a million of them around, and you can walk out right now and pick one up right now for ~$400. Hardly a historical piece, let alone museum quality, and a full on museum quality restoration is overkill. Thats kinda like breaking out the cotton gloves and magnifying glasses to fix up an AK, hardly makes sense

Also, point of interest, epoxy resins were first created in the 1930's, so for a gun made in the 50's, so it would indeed be applicable for the time period, especially given that again, the model 11 was a mass-produced stamped steel firearm

All anyone needed to do was a simple search:
https://www.militaryfactory.com/smal...allarms_id=675

Quoting the above article:
Famous American gunsmith John Moses Browning (1855-1926) had many of his popular rifle and shotgun designs licensed exclusively with the Winchester Repeating Arms Company during the late 1800s. Having developed a new shotgun that would become the hugely successful "Browning Auto 5", he attempted to convince Winchester representatives of a new royalty-based fee system based on sales of the design. Being rebuffed, Browning took his work to Remington Arms Company of Ilion, New York, though an untimely heart attack to the then-president of the company shelved the endeavor for the short-term. With that, Browning secured production rights in Europe through his existing relationship with Fabrique-Nationale of Belgium (FN has already undertaken manufacture of Browning-designed pistols by this time). Within time, the design was back in the United States as Remington had agreed to manufacture the Auto-5 under the company designation of "Remington Autoloading Shotgun" in 1906. At its inception, the Remington shotgun became the first auto-loading shotgun to be produced in the United States. In 1911, the shotgun was renamed to the "Remington Model 11" and some 850,000 units went on to be sold until 1947.




In the very beginning of the video, Larry Potterfield states the gun was made in 1911, and 850K units were produced until the year 1947. But I agree with your premise. It would make no sense to me to entirely replace all the wood furniture, reblue the barrel, leaving the action untouched, only to save the original wood in a "time capsule" for future generations to look at. Everything that's 100 years old is not worthy of a preservation or historical restoration. Buildings with historical significance would be among those that deserve that respect. A "rare" firearm used in a battle or by a known combatant, with a provenance would be another.



I think "ripping" on the gunsmith for doing what he did as being "wrong" was uncalled for. Only he knows the history of that firearm and that may be limited to his ownership or what he was told by a customer. In this case, the customer's wishes should be respected. In the case of a rare piece, the customer should be advised as to the consequences to the history and possibly the value of any repairs are made.


Personally, the only item I have worthy of preservation is the family Bible. It has been passed down for multiple generations and has the family tree traced quite far back on the front pages which were left blank, possibly for that traditional purpose by the maker. The cover bindings have failed and it is heavily embossed leather possibly over a wood substructure. I don't know if a historical preservationist would be able to "repair" it or if they would leave it as is, but I would surely consult with one before doing anything.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #19 of 32 Old 02-21-2019, 12:33 PM
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Sorry OP but worth noting and responding...



I suppose that is a valid perspective......and one I encounter all to often and have seen many times with piece of antiquity that folks could..."care less about"..."being old."

It is an individual choice......to be sure.

I would suggest however, that it is on a spectrum between complacency toward history, and ignorance of it or its value...

As germane to WoodnThings shared video and your very perspective with the quoted comment above, it is a travesty easily avoided without much effort other than a reconsideration or perhaps a deeper understanding?

A vintage gun can (as I shared) still be used if one wishes to, as my Uncle did with many within his collection, and persevering history...and value as well...all at the same time...

I also don't think you would be too happy with taking a weapon that can be worth thousands being rendered "valued at cost in rendered condition" because of a pore decisions with erasing of its specific history...

With such augmentations (as reflected in the video) and/or alteration items like this gun (and many antiques) are rendered worthless by such inappropriate and aggressive interventions...all of which is clearly avoidable without any great effort...

But you are correct...most "could care less about that gun being old," or most "old things" in general for that matter...
Ignorant? Hardly. I have a different view on what is worth saving and what isnít. Do I value older items and history? Depends on what items and whose version of history we are discussing. You make several assumptions about how I and others view old items and history. Thatís ok, for you, and I kinda understand from reading your posts. I just donít think all old things need time and money spent on them.
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Apologies to all...but only for my points being mistake...

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Ignorant? Hardly...


First Kerrys...!!!...You personally are not ignorant!!!...Never meant that...It's the "mindset" that is ignorant...This is why I really hate forum posts...!!!

Unless I use a gob of "emojis" I can be taken wrongly about the most important points of my post...Which I think, you now actually got... at this point from your last comment...???...Thank you for that!!!

Please do read all of this post...It's really important to me and what I do professionally...because I actually would like your (and others feedback.)

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Im with you on that one. For one, thats hardly a particularly valuable or rare gun, that model was produced from 1949 to 1968...
Hi Epicfail48,

The gun in question (as Woodnthings noted) was over 100 years old and an original Model 11...not a Model 11-48...

I completely agree with your understanding if it had been...100%...for exactly the reason you shared!!!


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...I agree with your premise. It would make no sense to me to entirely replace all the wood furniture, reblue the barrel, leaving the action untouched, only to save the original wood in a "time capsule" for future generations to look at. Everything that's 100 years old is not worthy of a preservation or historical restoration. Buildings with historical significance would be among those that deserve that respect. A "rare" firearm used in a battle or by a known combatant, with a provenance would be another....
One...I didn't "rip" on the Gunsmith at all...I actually suggested that his talents are clearly shown in the video...

I did say what he did was wrong...and it still is...If I did what he did on a number of different artifacts...including guns...over my career....I WOULD LOOSE MY JOB, MY REPUTATION AND THE RESPECT OF THOSE IN THE RESTORATION INDUSTRY...!!!!

I am sorry (sincerely...!) if you can't understand or don't get that? Its a constant battle for me professionally with "lay-folk" and there naivety about the proper treatment of antiquities. Even things as "young" as only being 100 years old, and/or "perceived" as common. They might be...(some that seem to be are not!!!)...but that doesn't change what "good practice" is and what proper handling can save a client, owner, or the confused from making a ghastly mistake!!!

As for "respecting a clients wishes,"...NO AGAIN!!!...I represent the "artifact!" If a client (or a potential client) wants me to do something erroneous and/or damaging to a vintage item...they can go to a Furniture Repair Woodworker that does such travesties...and calls it restoration!!! I will not be part to it...nor can I afford to professionally because I have seen "clients" come back on people that just..."do as they are asked,"...and get sued for..." breach of professional conduct"...and loose their case because they claim of just doing a job as asked for...

I'm an actual professional...Historic Preservation-Restorationist...If I don't apply due diligence in educating a client about what they own, then I'm not actually doing my job!!!

As for your Bible...Yes!!...it needs to be handled by a document archivist or related, and if I may be so bold, please where gloves now when you handle it from now on. We are seeing the loss of way too many "Family Bibles" because they are at the end of there serviceable life span without intervention. Parts of it may actually be true "vellum parchment" and other related leather/hide based materials like vellum. It's age, and value to the family alone warrants proper care and handling...

>>>

Before we give the poor OP his post thread back, if all of you would indulge me please...I have a little more that I would love for you to read and then PM me and/or start a new post (I'm not sure what to call it?) in the "off topic" forum section.

I will share two related stories that may help drive my point home...At least I hope it does, so all of you can (perhaps?) rethink your perspectives and possible save someone from "themselves" by doing so...

In my life and career now I have conservatively probably seen well over 5 to 10 million dollars (!!!) of furniture, coin, document, weapons, architecture and related vintage items rendered...either worthless...or..."valued at cost in rendered condition."

Case in point, my Uncles friend a very talented older Gentleman and also an excellent Gunsmith...very similar to the one in the video. He had a fine collection of weapons that he had left his wife and family on his passing...

Sadly, and with deep regret, when they had his collection assessed for "value" within his estate it came back as "value as operational weapons only" as all had been..."improperly restored and/or modified." A number of his shotguns, muzzle loaders and pistols would have garnered 100K at Southerbeys or related auction house. All decline the collection because of the..."damage"...cause by improper alternation and "irreversible conservation efforts..."

I've see this in guns all to often and in furniture...you name it!!!

At it comes from...ignorance and naivety...!!!...and I don't mean that in you (or anyone) is "stupid" (per se) but that there are too many "alleged professionals" out there giving bad advise and the damage to historic objects is more common than "good practice," ever will be unfortunately!!! The fiscal losses alone to folks is reason enough to..."slow down"...in thinking just because you (or anyone)..."THINKS?"...it's not "old enough" or "important enough" to warrant such treatment...!!!...Once the damage is done...it can't be undone!!!

I will close with one more related huge loses...

A stained glass window hidden in a wall along with several lighting sconces that a "Bob Villa" type professional General Contractor (*note they actually had worked on the show at one time!!!) was doing a..."full historic restoration"...on a 1850's home in Stamford Connecticut for a client of mine.

I will make is short...This alleged "expert" in restoration had ripped out the sconces and busted the window doing "demo work" and told the client that the items where not worth saving or bothering with...I recognized what..."I thought???"...they might be...

Value:...undamaged almost $100k!!! I saved two of the sconces from going to the land fill at $15000 each!!!! The General Contractor was "fired!!!"

If you want to talk about more horror stories with antique furniture in the hands of "Antique Restores" and the damage and lose in value they cause annually... I have many that are quite sad!!!

Last edited by 35015; 02-21-2019 at 11:27 PM.
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