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post #1 of 21 Old 02-19-2011, 09:22 PM Thread Starter
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Crown Molding

Hi All,

I have a combination kitchen/den area in my home and the kitchen cabinets limit the size of the crown molding that I can use. However, my preference is for a larger crown molding.

Is it acceptable to have one size crown molding in the kitchen/den area and a larger size throughout the rest of the house?

Thanks in advance,

Bob
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post #2 of 21 Old 02-19-2011, 09:38 PM
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that wouldnt bother me, unless they join at any point. then id do same size.

Last edited by jack warner; 02-19-2011 at 09:41 PM.
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post #3 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 05:16 AM
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that wouldnt bother me, unless they join at any point. then id do same size.
+1.








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post #4 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 07:07 AM
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The crown molding in my den is much smaller than the crown molding in the rest of my house. Plus they join at every doorway.

My den is the only original room left in my house and I refuse to change it. It is the old fashioned dark panel with a small dark crown at the ceiling. I personally redid the rest of my house and it is much larger, white crown.

I LIKE MY DEN JUST AS IT IS!!! Sore subject with my wife.

It never even crosses my mind unless a topic like this comes up.

George
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post #5 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 07:38 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys,

I now feel more comfortable going ahead with the project.

I do have another question though. I own a Ryobi Compound Table Mitre saw but I will not be using it to make a compound cut. I purchased the Kreg Crown Pro jig which allows me to hold the stock very steady while making a simple mitre cut. My son-in-law owns a much better DeWalt Table Mitre saw which I can borrow.

I would prefer to use my own Ryobi saw but someone told me that a more expensive power saw actually gives more precise cuts. I had always thought that the precision of the cuts was the same and that the only difference would be durability and perhaps features.

Could you please confirm if there is indeed a difference in precision of the cuts? If so, I'll borrow my son's-in-law saw.

Again, thank you ahead of time.

Bob
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post #6 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 07:51 AM
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I can't confirm or deny what one saw can do over the other. I would think the precision and accuracy would depend on the individual saw and how well it's aligned and maintained. Of course, the operator has a lot to do with how well a project turns out.

I used an adjustable miter box for years with a back saw that served me well.








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post #7 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 10:53 AM
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Thanks guys,

I now feel more comfortable going ahead with the project.

I do have another question though. I own a Ryobi Compound Table Mitre saw but I will not be using it to make a compound cut. I purchased the Kreg Crown Pro jig which allows me to hold the stock very steady while making a simple mitre cut. My son-in-law owns a much better DeWalt Table Mitre saw which I can borrow.

I would prefer to use my own Ryobi saw but someone told me that a more expensive power saw actually gives more precise cuts. I had always thought that the precision of the cuts was the same and that the only difference would be durability and perhaps features.

Could you please confirm if there is indeed a difference in precision of the cuts? If so, I'll borrow my son's-in-law saw.

Again, thank you ahead of time.

Bob
im not a fan of ryobi tools, but a saw is a saw. it still cuts wood accurate enough, as long as its adjusted properly. i use a coping saw for fine adjustments, or sometimes just a utility knife to shave of the back side of the miter. i recomend practice with what you have.
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post #8 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 11:18 AM
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I usually set up a sacrificial fence on my miter saw for crown moldings. I prefer to cut the moldings upside down, held on an angle rather than make compound cuts, but, some crowns are too large and have to be cut on the flat. The sacrificial fence can have a crown stop added and the kerf shows exactly where the blade will cut, takes the guess work out and is more accurate than a laser. As long as the saw is adjusted properly and you have the correct, sharp blade, your saw should be up to the task.
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post #9 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 11:48 AM Thread Starter
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I usually set up a sacrificial fence on my miter saw for crown moldings. I prefer to cut the moldings upside down, held on an angle rather than make compound cuts, but, some crowns are too large and have to be cut on the flat. The sacrificial fence can have a crown stop added and the kerf shows exactly where the blade will cut, takes the guess work out and is more accurate than a laser. As long as the saw is adjusted properly and you have the correct, sharp blade, your saw should be up to the task.
The Kreg Crown Pro jig works beautiful for cutting molding as you do.

http://www.theroutermaniac.com/kreg-...n-molding-jig/

Bob
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post #10 of 21 Old 02-20-2011, 12:30 PM
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the way tought to me, i guess might be confusing to some. but its the i learned it. ive never used any of the new fandangle jigs.
i like to set my saw once. 31.6 bevel to the left cuz im right handed, and 33.9 miter. then i let the wood placement dictate the cut.
fallowing this guid line.

Mitered outside corner:
Left-hand piece = Bottom edge against fence
Right-hand piece = Top edge against fence

Coped inside corner:
Left-hand piece = Top edge against fence
Right-hand piece = Bottom edge against fence

Last edited by jack warner; 02-20-2011 at 02:49 PM.
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post #11 of 21 Old 02-23-2011, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Guys,

I finished the crown molding in the kitchen/den area and am very satisfied with the results. Thank you for your help.

I have another question.

Is there a rule or formula for the correct size of crown molding? For example, if the dimensions of the room are x by y by z, the crown molding should be d inches.

Thanks again,
Bob
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post #12 of 21 Old 02-23-2011, 11:04 AM
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Is there a rule or formula for the correct size of crown molding? For example, if the dimensions of the room are x by y by z, the crown molding should be d inches.

Thanks again,
Bob
I don't know of a formula like that. I think the design and size of the crown should be an enhancement to the room or the casework it's attached to. For a room with a very tall ceiling and very high cabinets a short crown may look out of scale. Then again, an exaggerated crown may be part of the overall look, which makes for visual impact.

I usually just use samples of the style of the crown I can buy, or make, and pick one that seems to fit the overall look.








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post #13 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 03:10 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Guys,

I'll recap what's been going on.

The project I'm engaged in is to install crown molding and paint the kitchen/den area, the living room and the dining room. I embarked upon this since we had the floors professionally refinished and all the rooms were empty so it seemed only natural to continue where the floor finishers left off.

The crown molding is in and most of the preparation work for the painting is finished. Additionally, the ceiling in the kitchen/den area is complete. And most important, the Mrs. is very happy with the results. However, I'm not.

I wasn't happy with the corners and the associated gaps. Fortunately, I worked some magic with caulking compound.

With respect to the dining and living rooms, both are about 13 feet by 13 feet and there are no joints in the crown molding. I managed to cut complete 13 foot lengths from 16 foot sections.

If I were dealing with finished hard wood with visible joints, I think I would have had to go with two six and a half foot sections along each wall. I feel I could have worked the corners correctly but I would have had to contend with a scarf joint in the middle.

Would this have been a reasonable approach for fine hardwood molding or could an experienced carpenter have worked the joints correctly with 13 foot sections and no joints?

Thanks in advance,
Bob

Last edited by Bob Guercio; 03-09-2011 at 03:14 AM.
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post #14 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 04:38 AM
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Would this have been a reasonable approach for fine hardwood molding or could an experienced carpenter have worked the joints correctly with 13 foot sections and no joints?

Thanks in advance,
Bob
An experienced trim installer would prefer to have lengths to allow no sectional joints. In my assessment of the installation in the beginning, I would have a sketch of the rooms showing the dimensions. I would then plan out the installation picking lengths, with pieces that are similar.

The problem with scarf joints to make long runs is that it's close to difficult to match up two pieces so closely that the run is not noticeably different. Another problem with scarfed joints is to have a backer or a mounting firm enough to carry both pieces in a straight line with no change in plane. Scarfed joints could become a visual problem if it lands in a very focal area of the room.

I usually carry out the mouldings finished, and doing jointwork requires sanding and touch up, which can be time consuming to get it right.








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post #15 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 06:37 AM
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the way tought to me, i guess might be confusing to some. but its the i learned it. ive never used any of the new fandangle jigs.
i like to set my saw once. 31.6 bevel to the left cuz im right handed, and 33.9 miter. then i let the wood placement dictate the cut.
fallowing this guid line.

Mitered outside corner:
Left-hand piece = Bottom edge against fence
Right-hand piece = Top edge against fence

Coped inside corner:
Left-hand piece = Top edge against fence
Right-hand piece = Bottom edge against fence
This is correct, there's no need to flip over the crown and hold it upside down against the fence. Lay it flat and cut it safely and accurately. The mitre and bevel settings differ with each spring angle of the crown, though (45 or 52).

DeWalt has a great chart to show you the appropriate bevel and mitre for each spring angle and wall angle (since rarely is it 90 degrees). I've used this countless times successfully.

Ut Prosim

Last edited by Taylormade; 03-09-2011 at 06:39 AM.
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post #16 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 09:57 AM Thread Starter
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the way tought to me, i guess might be confusing to some. but its the i learned it. ive never used any of the new fandangle jigs.
i like to set my saw once. 31.6 bevel to the left cuz im right handed, and 33.9 miter. then i let the wood placement dictate the cut.
fallowing this guid line.

Mitered outside corner:
Left-hand piece = Bottom edge against fence
Right-hand piece = Top edge against fence

Coped inside corner:
Left-hand piece = Top edge against fence
Right-hand piece = Bottom edge against fence
Jack,

I just want to confirm my understanding of 33.9 miter and 31.6 bevel.

That's accuracy to a tenth of a degree??

Bob
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post #17 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 12:07 PM
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Jack,

I just want to confirm my understanding of 33.9 miter and 31.6 bevel.

That's accuracy to a tenth of a degree??

Bob
It is, and most compound mitre saws will have built in stops, or marks minimally for them. The marks above are based on a true 90 degree angle between walls with a 52/38 degree spring angled crown (most common).

Ut Prosim
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post #18 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 10:39 PM
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Jack,

I just want to confirm my understanding of 33.9 miter and 31.6 bevel.

That's accuracy to a tenth of a degree??

Bob
absolutly. its more accurate than most walls will be.
ive had to float out corners to look good with the molding, witch sucks, but whatever it take!!

Last edited by jack warner; 03-09-2011 at 10:47 PM.
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post #19 of 21 Old 03-09-2011, 10:45 PM
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[QUOTE=Taylormade;194303]This is correct, there's no need to flip over the crown and hold it upside down against the fence. Lay it flat and cut it safely and accurately. The mitre and bevel settings differ with each spring angle of the crown, though (45 or 52).


absolutly, this is for a 52/38 witch i prefure over the 45. imo it give a little more flexability on walls that may not be square.
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post #20 of 21 Old 03-10-2011, 07:21 PM Thread Starter
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absolutly. its more accurate than most walls will be.
ive had to float out corners to look good with the molding, witch sucks, but whatever it take!!
Jack,

Is floating out corners the same as shimming?

Thanks,
Bob
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