Crack in epoxy river table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 3Likes
  • 1 Post By John Smith_inFL
  • 1 Post By John Smith_inFL
  • 1 Post By DrRobert
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 09:14 AM Thread Starter
Tee
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 6
View Tee's Photo Album My Photos
Crack in epoxy river table

Hi all I'm new this is my first post, I recently made an a coffee table for a friend with an oak top and the cracks filled with epoxy resin. I had stored at mine for about a week after I had completed it, he picked it up 2 weeks ago and brought it back yesterday saying it had developed small crack on the top picture attached, any reason what might have caused it there are larger cracks and smaller ones filled with epoxy that are still all ok
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG-20200927-WA0000_1601298744110.jpg
Views:	23
Size:	138.5 KB
ID:	396075  

Tee is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 09:22 AM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,219
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
welcome to the forum, Tee.
can you post a photo of the whole table ??

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #3 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 09:33 AM Thread Starter
Tee
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 6
View Tee's Photo Album My Photos
Thank You John yes I will attach them
Tee is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 09:35 AM Thread Starter
Tee
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 6
View Tee's Photo Album My Photos
I have held a wooden skewer so to show where the crack is
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0095_1601300032590.jpg
Views:	19
Size:	528.2 KB
ID:	396077  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0092_1601300048548.jpg
Views:	17
Size:	616.6 KB
ID:	396079  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0093_1601300071134.jpg
Views:	17
Size:	584.5 KB
ID:	396081  

Tee is offline  
post #5 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 09:55 AM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,219
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
depending on many factors, (weather, humidity, atmospheric changes, etc)
a round "cookie" slab will crack like that for ever.
just accept that that is part of that style cut of wood.
repair it as it happens - don't fret over it. it is surely going to happen again.
(beautiful job on the table, BTW).

.
TobyC likes this.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #6 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 10:09 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 278
View mackman's Photo Album My Photos
I don't have a lot of experience with cookies that large. I will say that John Smith may well be correct and that you won't be able to predict when another crack will open up. In that case, your best bet would be a more matte, non-film finish (maybe my personal favorite, a tung oil friction finish?): That way, any new crack will be much less noticeable and will more easily be seen as just part of the table. (rather than an unsightly crack in an otherwise perfect, shiny surface).

Mackenzie Mulligan of Mulligan Woodworking!


Follow along in my journey from amateur to slightly less so at my blog!
mackman is offline  
post #7 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 11:35 AM Thread Starter
Tee
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 6
View Tee's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you for the replies, I was thinking of filling it up with epoxy again and giving it a coat of varnish it's the first time I made a table with epoxy, if the epoxy did not sleep through would the table do that?
Tee is offline  
post #8 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 11:57 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 278
View mackman's Photo Album My Photos
Do you know the history of the piece of wood? How old is it and how long has it been drying?

Mackenzie Mulligan of Mulligan Woodworking!


Follow along in my journey from amateur to slightly less so at my blog!
mackman is offline  
post #9 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 12:02 PM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,219
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tee View Post
if the epoxy did not seep through would the table do that?
it may or may not. we have no idea. but, just wait awhile, and another
crack will appear in another place. it is wood - that's what it does.

I have had good results with thick epoxy by putting a couple of layers
of an old cloth over the shop-vac hose end underneath the board (table)
and sort of sucking the thick epoxy down through the crack.
several factors play a role: thickness of epoxy, type of epoxy, temperature,
amount of suction applied to the bottom of the crack. (too little - too much).
you can find what works for you through experimentation.

Example:

Crack in epoxy river table-vacuum-epoxy.jpg

.
TobyC likes this.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 09-28-2020 at 12:18 PM. Reason: added photo
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #10 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 12:11 PM
Smart and Cool
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,935
View shoot summ's Photo Album My Photos
Many factors, was the cookie dried? Did you finish both sides of it?

I would say that it was not dry at a minimum, I have a 4' cookie in the shop that was kiln dried, it's been there for almost a year and has not developed any new cracks, and I don't expect it to.
shoot summ is online now  
post #11 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 01:44 PM Thread Starter
Tee
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 6
View Tee's Photo Album My Photos
Well the guy who sold it to me said he had it drying for 2 years I had it stored by me for another 2 months before working on it, I used my router to plane it sanded and then filled cracks with epoxy and finished with coat of varnish, kept it for two weeks before my friend picked it up and according to him he went to bed and the nest day it had cracked..I have had it for 2 days since I there has been no change to the crack or more forming..
Tee is offline  
post #12 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 01:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 278
View mackman's Photo Album My Photos
There are three options that I see for you.

1: Keep doing what you're doing. Fill the crack, finish with another thin coat of varnish, and see what happens. Maybe it cracks, maybe it doesn't: If it does, fix it again.

2: Embrace the possibility of cracks and work around it. Refinish with an oil finish so that a new crack won't really mar the finish like it would mar a glossy finish. It'll just look like the crack was always there and may not require your attention to fix.

3: Do more to eliminate the possibility of cracks. Finish both the top and bottom of the slab with a thick coat of clear epoxy. This won't guarantee no cracks, but it will dramatically slow down the rate at which at the moisture content of the slab changes, which is what causes the cracks in the first place (I believe). With this option, you MAY prevent further cracks, but there's no guarantee, and fixing any cracks will likely be more time consuming.

I don't think there is a perfect option, because working with slabs like this is fundamentally tricky. In the end, you're going to have to take a leap of faith and be willing to fix it if necessary.

Mackenzie Mulligan of Mulligan Woodworking!


Follow along in my journey from amateur to slightly less so at my blog!
mackman is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 02:14 PM
Moderator
 
John Smith_inFL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 3,219
View John Smith_inFL's Photo Album My Photos
all the above apply:

just for aesthetic purposes, put some contrasting color "butterfly" or "bowtie"
patches in. it will look jam up and jelly tight !!

Name:  1429207.jpg
Views: 30
Size:  57.7 KB

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
John Smith_inFL is online now  
post #14 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 02:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: NE FL
Posts: 757
View DrRobert's Photo Album My Photos
White oak is one of the worst species for this.

I predict it won't be the last crack you fill......

Sorry.
TobyC likes this.

Robert
DrRobert is online now  
post #15 of 17 Old 09-28-2020, 04:54 PM
Smart and Cool
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,935
View shoot summ's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tee View Post
Well the guy who sold it to me said he had it drying for 2 years I had it stored by me for another 2 months before working on it, I used my router to plane it sanded and then filled cracks with epoxy and finished with coat of varnish, kept it for two weeks before my friend picked it up and according to him he went to bed and the nest day it had cracked..I have had it for 2 days since I there has been no change to the crack or more forming..
You haven't indicated how thick it is, but it's unlikely it was dry(as the crack has now told you).

There are a lot of folks out there cutting slabs and cookies, there are way fewer that are processing them correctly for use. A moisture meter would be a good investment if you continue working with slabs and cookies.
shoot summ is online now  
post #16 of 17 Old 09-29-2020, 07:15 AM Thread Starter
Tee
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 6
View Tee's Photo Album My Photos
Thank you all for the great advice a moisture meter is definitely on the way I'm going to keep the slab here for about a month till my friend moves into his new place I will monitor to see if anymore cracks appear.. what a great forum this is
Tee is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 09-30-2020, 09:18 AM
Member
 
NoNails's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: West TN
Posts: 34
View NoNails's Photo Album My Photos
Adding to John's recommendation of bow-ties (I like), it will crack again, enhance these faults don't hide. Variations in humidity will continue to cause circumferential cracking in a cookie like this.

"Fast is Fine, but Accuracy is Final, You Must Learn to be Slow in a Hurry!
NoNails is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome