Corian for a table saw sled runners? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 05-15-2016, 09:46 PM Thread Starter
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Corian for a table saw sled runners?

A few weeks back I salvaged some nice Corian countertops that were removed from a job down the street from one of my jobs. It was in the dumpster so I walked over and asked if I could take it. I loaded it up. Got about 14' x 2' in 3 pcs. The end of one is cracked so I cut off about 24" to square up the end. So, today I was playing with cutting and routing that 24" of corian. I noticed how nice the corian would slide on the table saw. So, I cut a couple of runners for a table saw sled. Wow, does it slide nice in the miter gauge slot. I can't see why I can't use that corian for my new table saw sled.
Anyone see any downside? Otherwise, I think its a go...

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post #2 of 17 Old 05-15-2016, 09:56 PM
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I'd suspect it would work great.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #3 of 17 Old 05-15-2016, 10:51 PM
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I'll bet it works great. I used some leftover 3/8" pvc sheet on my ts sled without any problems.

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post #4 of 17 Old 05-15-2016, 10:54 PM
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I wouldn't use it for that application. I think it's too brittle. I think a hardwood such as maple would be a lot better.
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post #5 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 12:30 AM
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Corian is a resin product and I think if it's good enough for counter tops, it's probably good enough for table saw sled runners. As a resin, it is a soft material and in my opinion a poor choice for kitchen counter top (great for bath). In the kitchen, knives will tear into it after a period... But as a sled runner - why not? Even if you use your sled 365/year - it will probably last you a life time.

As for the rest of your Corian score... let me show off some of my Corian uses. Corian is easy to work with using routers, table saws and band saws. But try using a jig or better yet, a scroll saw. Because it is a resin product, it tends to melt around blades that produce any heat. I researched the product and learned that if you cover your work area with "packing" tape used in the shipping industry, the glue and plastic of the tape will coat your blade and allow you to cut Corian with even a heat producing scroll saw blade. Here is proof... these are made from Corian and they will last forever...
Attached Images
  
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post #6 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 07:45 AM Thread Starter
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BernieL
Thanks for the tips. This top was used for a kitchen counter and that is why is was being replaced. I found that my 6" Bosch random orbital sander can bring the surface back to life, sorta speak.
I am going to find many uses for my find.
I am going to give it a try with it as runners.
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post #7 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 09:18 AM
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BernieL that's some really pretty work,I have to agree with most everything you said about corian yes you have to be careful with it just like you do with Formica The beauty of it is that it can be repaired in place without being able to detect the patch solid surface is the proper term for the maternal corona is a brand name I make a lot of plaques out of it on my CNC and it cuts beautiful I don't know how much dust kicks up on scroll saw but use a dust mask when you're using it on the tablesaw or sanding it Bernie L just a side note back when dinosaurs roamed the world when I was a youngster I spent my summers of my grandfathers on Squam Lake 😀. PS it will make great runners for your tablesaw. i'm going to the shop
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post #8 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 10:41 AM
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I think it would be great for runners, slick, stable, easy to machine.
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post #9 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
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I wouldn't use it for that application. I think it's too brittle. I think a hardwood such as maple would be a lot better.
Agree. Too brittle was also my first thought.

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post #10 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 06:02 PM
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brittle? hardly. it takes quite a bending as countertop material.

as a sled runner?
well, let us first ask ourselves,,,, what criteria makes a superior sled runner?
uhm....
friction free
stability
lack of swelling / shrinking with humidity changes

frankly I'm hard put to name another so well suited runner material.
solid HDPE mebbe.
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post #11 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 06:11 PM
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What are you guys doing to your sleds that your worried how brittle the runners are???
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post #12 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 07:40 PM
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What are you guys doing to your sleds that your worried how brittle the runners are???
A strip for a runner for a sled is only 3/8" x 3/4". You could bust it just screwing the strips to the sled. Then the sled wouldn't stay on the saw, it would be put in storage and handled a lot where it could receive some hits.
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post #13 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 08:38 PM
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Quote:
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A strip for a runner for a sled is only 3/8" x 3/4". You could bust it just screwing the strips to the sled. Then the sled wouldn't stay on the saw, it would be put in storage and handled a lot where it could receive some hits.
Huh?

Ever seen or heard of UHMW plastic? It is used all the time for runners, bumpers, etc. Very similar in composition to Corian, and Corian is quite capable of withstanding the abuse a runner would take.

If you have a problem breaking a runner with screws, some simple basic steps will prevent that. First off, try pre-drilling a hole and countersinking it. Second, using the correct length screw and not over-tightening it will also be helpful.
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post #14 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 09:12 PM Thread Starter
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Drilling and fastening corian

Today I called my corian fabricator and talked with the shop foreman whom I know pretty well. I asked about drilling and screwing corian. I was told that when you drill a hole to put a screw in to drill the hole for the screw a little larger than the threads and then chamfer the screw hole to set the screw flush with the surface. then the screw will hold the corian but not split it, h. Curt he also suggested hand tightening the screws to prevent cracking. He thought it would make great sled runners (obviously) and suggested that I cut a dado into the plywood sled and silicone the runners in the dado. Don't even use screws. Interesting thoought ???


Marty
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post #15 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 09:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
A strip for a runner for a sled is only 3/8" x 3/4". You could bust it just screwing the strips to the sled. Then the sled wouldn't stay on the saw, it would be put in storage and handled a lot where it could receive some hits.

3/8 x 3/4 hard maple can be broke easily by hand too. Drill the runners before screwing them on, and there shouldn't be any issue.
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post #16 of 17 Old 05-16-2016, 10:45 PM
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3/8 x 3/4 hard maple can be broke easily by hand too. Drill the runners before screwing them on, and there shouldn't be any issue.
Myself with wood I normally glue and pin the runners.

I've worked a great deal with corian making counter tops. When working with narrow pieces you had to be very careful not to break them.
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post #17 of 17 Old 05-17-2016, 12:04 AM
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Hey Steve... take a close look at the Welcome sign and cross that I've made. I have lots of VERY NARROW cuts in these projects made of Corian... no problem! I've made several of these projects and never had an issue...

I've "LIKED" and "THANKED" a few comments. I have nothing more to add!

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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