Construction lumber. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 25 Old 08-22-2018, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Construction lumber.

You go to the lumber yard and pick through the piles, (in this case 2X4s), and pick the best. They look pretty good in the shop - till you run them through the jointer! Good thing I only need an inch and 1/8" or so thickness.

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post #2 of 25 Old 08-22-2018, 05:13 PM
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Or the first board you run through your new jointer has a staple in the edge grain you over looked, still makes me mad, should have bought the one with the spiral cutting head LOL

There is no app for experience
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post #3 of 25 Old 08-22-2018, 05:20 PM Thread Starter
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Or the first board you run through your new jointer has a staple in the edge grain you over looked, still makes me mad, should have bought the one with the spiral cutting head LOL
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post #4 of 25 Old 08-22-2018, 11:01 PM
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What I hate is they nearly put a 1/4" radius on 2x4's now so Mr. Tinder woodworker won't get a splinter.
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post #5 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 01:06 AM
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What I hate is they nearly put a 1/4" radius on 2x4's now so Mr. Tinder woodworker won't get a splinter.
Thanks for sharing this. I always wondered why they go to the extra trouble of softening the edges on 2x4s and other construction lumber.
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post #6 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 01:50 AM
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You can't face hard corners together without excess shape. Sticks do not butt together. They don't.
Has absolutely nothing to do with your crew and their hands. It's construction wood science, instead.
The radius edges let you stack pieces to code for framing around doors and windows.

Are you trying to make something magnificent out of SPF framing studs?
Look through frame grade and you will not find furniture grade.
Maybe you people don't get to see the range of wood that comes out of Canadian mills.

I don't know where a lot of it goes but it's right up to the mechanical properties for luthier's tone wood.
You can build a guitar out of whatever you please.
Tone wood isn't 1 cubic meter in ten thousand.
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post #7 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 08:27 AM
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I go to Lowes. I pick out the straight and true 2 x 4s from the "kiln dried" pile. Take it home. Two weeks later they are twisted and warped. Lousy kiln I guess.
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post #8 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
You can't face hard corners together without excess shape. Sticks do not butt together. They don't.
Has absolutely nothing to do with your crew and their hands. It's construction wood science, instead.
The radius edges let you stack pieces to code for framing around doors and windows.

Can you explain this more? E.g., what's excess shape, stacking pieces to code.


I googled it and saw answers about preventing splinters, easier for machinery to handle, sharp edges catch on machinery, and fire prevention in the kiln (??) because sharp splintered edges catch fire more easily.

Last edited by gj13us; 08-24-2018 at 08:40 AM.
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post #9 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 01:29 PM
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Our nominal finished SPF 2x4 is precisely 1.5" thick.
With the radiused edges, you can stack two pieces for a window sill, door frame or wall that comes out to 3".
Then you add a stud (92 5/8") plus a cap for a 96" wall frame. I know the math doesn't add up. But it works.

Now, if the 2x4's had very square planed corners, it's very difficult to pack them to see just 3". Why that is, I don't understand.
In a past life, I framed and finished a 1200 sq ft concrete basement. Quite a learning experience just to get it framed!
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post #10 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 04:29 PM
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Probably is to prevent splinters, construction material is handled many times between the mill and the end project, if you hit a squared of corner some of the wood will splinter off, not so much with a rounded corner. This means that the material arrives at the job site in much better shape to work with.

The rounded corner material will still have straight edges to lay a square or level against, will not catch as it is run through a table saw, just a more efficient profile of the material.

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post #11 of 25 Old 08-24-2018, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Thanks for sharing this. I always wondered why they go to the extra trouble of softening the edges on 2x4s and other construction lumber.
Around about the time they started putting radius corners on construction lumber I saw an advertisement at my local lumber company saying something like "Use our X brand lumber, the corners are rounded so you don't get splinters". Can't remember when or even the company that advertised it. It's been a long time and the wood is getting much more radius today than it began with. Then they just barely eased the corners.

My parents house built in the late 19th century the 2x4's were a full 2"x4" and only surfaced on the two face sides. The edges were rough sawn. Also must have been local wood, they used poplar to make them out of.
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post #12 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
Our nominal finished SPF 2x4 is precisely 1.5" thick.
With the radiused edges, you can stack two pieces for a window sill, door frame or wall that comes out to 3".
Then you add a stud (92 5/8") plus a cap for a 96" wall frame. I know the math doesn't add up. But it works.

Now, if the 2x4's had very square planed corners, it's very difficult to pack them to see just 3". Why that is, I don't understand.
In a past life, I framed and finished a 1200 sq ft concrete basement. Quite a learning experience just to get it framed!

I am being very dense this morning. I do not see how the shape of the edge has anything to do with "stacking" to get 3". P;ease provide a little more explanation.


George
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post #13 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 08:43 AM Thread Starter
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Probably is to prevent splinters, construction material is handled many times between the mill and the end project, if you hit a squared of corner some of the wood will splinter off, not so much with a rounded corner. This means that the material arrives at the job site in much better shape to work with.

The rounded corner material will still have straight edges to lay a square or level against, will not catch as it is run through a table saw, just a more efficient profile of the material.
Many carpenters today don't use a square or a level. Wouldn't do them any good with as crooked and twisted as today's lumber is.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #14 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 12:00 PM
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I am being very dense this morning. I do not see how the shape of the edge has anything to do with "stacking" to get 3". P;ease provide a little more explanation.


George
Physics here has me a bit baffled as well.

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post #15 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 01:47 PM
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My theory is that the void at the edge becomes useful when the pieces are stacked.
It's a relief so the added pieces don't take up a little more room.
Maybe I don't have a clue how to build any stud walls, windows and door frames to code.
I learned to be mindful of added sizes. And, it always seems to work out.

I bought some squared 2x4 from a mill in Alberta.
I had to trim many pieces, say 1/8" to get them to fit.
The pairs of studs were bigger than COFI SPF.

I know the math doesn't add up. I don't know why.
I do know that I don't need to remember if I use COFI SPF.
Council Of Forest Industries (standard) Spruce/Pine/Fir.
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post #16 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 04:51 PM
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What I don't understand is how two pieces exactly 1 1/2" thick stacked will be a different total thickness depending on if the corners are rounded or not.
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post #17 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 07:06 PM Thread Starter
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Never had a problem studding walls with any type 2X4, including rough cut or S4S without rounded crners. I will agree the square edges are a bit unhandy to handle.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #18 of 25 Old 08-25-2018, 09:16 PM
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What I don't understand is how two pieces exactly 1 1/2" thick stacked will be a different total thickness depending on if the corners are rounded or not.
One way on a 2x4 is if for example you need to glue up a piece of wood that is 1 1/2"x 3 1/2" you would have to surface the wood down below where the corners are rounded causing you to have to use three boards instead. You otherwise would have a groove down the middle where the corners are rounded.
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post #19 of 25 Old 08-26-2018, 06:04 AM
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By rounding the corners over these companies are missing sales. "GLOVES"

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #20 of 25 Old 08-26-2018, 08:35 AM
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By rounding the corners over these companies are missing sales. "GLOVES"
I only get a splinter every couple years. I learned a long time ago not to let wood slide through your hands.
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