Coffee table from poplar ply - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 02:31 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Coffee table from poplar ply

Hey all,

New to this forum, but have worked with carpentry since I was little. Recently I've been getting into some furniture building for friends and referrals doing reclaimed wood and any project idea.

I recently was asked to build a modern style coffee table. Basically an upside down U shape. Clean, strait and simple. I looked into using mahogany planks, but the cost was way too much. The dimensions are 2" thick, 34" wide, 60" long, 17" tall.

After talking with them, he made it clear he didnt need hardwood and washer interested in the "look". So I suggested stacking several sheets of 3/4 ply, then doing a shoulder/box joint ends. They want a dark espresso/ebony stain.

So here's my questions: how would you suggest bonding the sheets of ply. I think I'm going to use 3 sheets and want to make sure it looks good. Then, use popular strips to cover the edges of the exposed ply so it looks solid.

The legs are Solid panels the same thickness and width and curious to get thoughts on the best way to join them. Thinking about backing the joints with a piece of angle iron and maybe dado/recess them in to be hidden.

Here's a link to the look they want:

http://m.crateandbarrel.com/topsider...-table/s234187

Thanks for any input!
mannadesigns is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 08:16 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
There's no reason you can't glue plywood together face to face however I've experienced the glue not drying in the center on larger sheets with carpenters glue. I would recommend using a resin glue on a piece of plywood 34" wide. If you have a solid flat workbench I would glue them up on that putting 2x6's edgeways across the top of the sheets clamping it pressing it against the table.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #3 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 09:07 AM
Senior Member
 
Alchymist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,222
View Alchymist's Photo Album My Photos
Perhaps glue and screw 2 sheets of the plywood together, small recess for the ends of the legs, and several long screws with washers through the plywood and glue (recessed washers) to secure the legs. Top with third piece of plywood to hide screws - invisible joint.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
Alchymist is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 09:37 AM
master sawdust maker
 
Wema826's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Brush Creek tn (1 hour east of Nashville
Posts: 437
View Wema826's Photo Album My Photos
I would suggest the top or outer most layer(s) using a miter joint to join the sides. this will give you a waterfall effect with the grain and all of your grain would match. You could use large finger joints on the 2 sub layers, If your going to stain all of it a dark coco or ebony stain, for the edge banding (pieces that cover up the plywood ends), I would use the same wood the ply is made from. and not poplar. poplar tends to be splotchy and not take stain very well and there would be a very noticeable contrast between the banding and the ply. at least in my experience working with poplar.

Now if your going to use a paint, then poplar would be fine.

Best of luck!! and be sure to post some pics of it when your building it!!

John,

Confidence does not come from always being right. It comes from not being afraid to be wrong.
Wema826 is offline  
post #5 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 04:48 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the feedback!

First on material - I mentioned popular because HD has a sale on 3/4 popular ply right now, so i thought maybe that would be a good choice... but do you think it won't take teh stain well? I could return it and get some BB ply, its just 10$ more per sheet. Can you get Birch side pieces then to use as the "caps"? Since i need to use a similar wood for the cap pieces, i'll need something that takes the stain in a similar manor.

Regarding glue-up. In some searching, seems like there is concern with causing the boards to warp a bit sing they'll be getting glue on only one side of the ply... Any rec's on best way to glue them up? I saw one suggestion of a home made vacuum bag using plastic and a shop vac, looked pretty cool:). With a composites background, I'm intrigued by the idea:)

I like the idea of mitering the top sheet, but i'm concerned with the best way to then bond those outer shees to the inner sheets and have it be strong without a ton of screws. Ideally there won't be any shown fasteners. I'm going to ask if they'd mind some screws going in from the bottom up through the 3 layers of ply, they'd be hidden on the bottom side of the table.

I have 2 ideas for the joints. I'd like to keep them simple as the table is so big, i'm not sure how i'd get feather joints on the long ends of the top boards. I don't feel great about a 5' board on end going through the dado blade... I've attached a few ideas. one is the outer miter concept, but i'm still not sure how i'd then bond the top/outer sheets.




I'm thinking about using PL adhesive, as i had read it works great for plywood bonding and won't be as big of an issue with moisture:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Loctite-P...3#.UXLv2JPCZ8E

thanks for any more input!
mannadesigns is offline  
post #6 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 09:57 PM
master sawdust maker
 
Wema826's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Brush Creek tn (1 hour east of Nashville
Posts: 437
View Wema826's Photo Album My Photos
A lot really depends on what tools you have available. and your skill level. I personally would double up the sub frame like you have in your bottom sketch up. only join them with finger joints. as long as you have square corners and you can cut a square miter it will line up correctly. down side is if your off the miters will look like doo doo. as far as strength goes. it would be rock solid with 3 layers of 3/4 ply.

for the "caps" it would be possible to use the same ply your using. it would involve more miters. Kind of make a "V' channel on both sides of the table up one leg, across the length of the table and down the other leg. then form and cut triangle shaped end caps that would fill the void in 3 pieces per side.

now that would be a miter class for any seasoned wood worker!!!

John,

Confidence does not come from always being right. It comes from not being afraid to be wrong.
Wema826 is offline  
post #7 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 11:42 PM
Senior Member
 
BZawat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
Posts: 1,455
View BZawat's Photo Album My Photos
Contact cement. Do it at work all the time for bank teller lines. Have someone help you stick the pieces together. Use dowels to space them for easier glue up. Cut pieces bigger and then recut to final size after gluing together. This way they don't have to line up perfectly.
BZawat is offline  
post #8 of 41 Old 04-20-2013, 11:55 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,963
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
I'd build it torsion box stile. Just two layers of plywood will be very heavy. The torsion box will also be very flat.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #9 of 41 Old 04-21-2013, 08:47 AM
master sawdust maker
 
Wema826's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Brush Creek tn (1 hour east of Nashville
Posts: 437
View Wema826's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
I'd build it torsion box stile. Just two layers of plywood will be very heavy. The torsion box will also be very flat.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
yea, I did not even think of that, It would be just a s strong and a bit lighter.

John,

Confidence does not come from always being right. It comes from not being afraid to be wrong.
Wema826 is offline  
post #10 of 41 Old 04-21-2013, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer
I'd build it torsion box stile. Just two layers of plywood will be very heavy. The torsion box will also be very flat.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
Yah I like that idea. Would save me a sheet if plywood too!

Still need to figure out the joints. Tempted to try the miters, however my rip fence is only 36" so I'm not sure i can even do it since the top is 34" I might do miters on the end, so as suggested the grain will flow over the top, but still cap each side.
mannadesigns is offline  
post #11 of 41 Old 04-21-2013, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannadesigns

Yah I like that idea. Would save me a sheet if plywood too!

Still need to figure out the joints. Tempted to try the miters, however my rip fence is only 36" so I'm not sure i can even do it since the top is 34" I might do miters on the end, so as suggested the grain will flow over the top, but still cap each side.
Oops, I mean the fence is only 26"...
mannadesigns is offline  
post #12 of 41 Old 04-21-2013, 07:13 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,963
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannadesigns

Oops, I mean the fence is only 26"...
Do you have a table saw sled? I'm building a table 57" long. I cross cut it with my largest sled. All you need is support on the end about 3/4 of the length.

You could also clamp a runner on the piece and slide it in your miter gage slot.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #13 of 41 Old 04-22-2013, 12:37 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer

Do you have a table saw sled? I'm building a table 57" long. I cross cut it with my largest sled. All you need is support on the end about 3/4 of the length.

You could also clamp a runner on the piece and slide it in your miter gage slot.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
Could you post a pic of your sled? I was planning on building a cross cut sled before this job and have been debating what size to make it. I didn't think I could make it 60" long...
mannadesigns is offline  
post #14 of 41 Old 04-22-2013, 01:14 AM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,963
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
This is the biggest one I have. You can make it bigger but it's not needed.

Name:  image-1227686110.jpg
Views: 227
Size:  38.1 KB

this picture was taken from the back

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #15 of 41 Old 04-22-2013, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Nice! Yah, planning on building something similar, but won't be able to miter the long edges. Also - would need to cut a 45 into the sled...

After some thought, i think this is how i'm gonna do the ends. No miters, but capping the ends of the boards, and dowel/glue the end pieces. Then cap the sides. I'm going to go the "torque box" route, as it'll save me a piece of ply and some weight as well. Through in a few shots of the "section view" to see my plan for putting it all together.





mannadesigns is offline  
post #16 of 41 Old 04-22-2013, 04:29 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,963
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannadesigns
Nice! Yah, planning on building something similar, but won't be able to miter the long edges. Also - would need to cut a 45 into the sled...

After some thought, i think this is how i'm gonna do the ends. No miters, but capping the ends of the boards, and dowel/glue the end pieces. Then cap the sides. I'm going to go the "torque box" route, as it'll save me a piece of ply and some weight as well. Through in a few shots of the "section view" to see my plan for putting it all together.
Looks like a good idea. Miters seem easy but they aren't.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #17 of 41 Old 04-23-2013, 02:27 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Got the main rips done, had to clamp and use the skil to crosscut oversized to get manageable pieces. Should finish the cross cut sled tomorrow to put some nicer trims on the ends and start gluing up the torque boxes.

Also made a zero clearance insert for the new saw...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	image-1866585381.jpg
Views:	188
Size:	101.2 KB
ID:	69017  

Click image for larger version

Name:	image-3700583176.jpg
Views:	190
Size:	71.7 KB
ID:	69018  

Attached Images
 
mannadesigns is offline  
post #18 of 41 Old 04-23-2013, 11:08 PM
Wood Snob
 
Al B Thayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 5,963
View Al B Thayer's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannadesigns
Got the main rips done, had to clamp and use the skil to crosscut oversized to get manageable pieces. Should finish the cross cut sled tomorrow to put some nicer trims on the ends and start gluing up the torque boxes.

Also made a zero clearance insert for the new saw...
Nice!
The sled is going to make you a better woodworker by default. I have 3 and don't know how I lived without them.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


Al B Thayer is offline  
post #19 of 41 Old 04-24-2013, 09:55 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
mannadesigns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 23
View mannadesigns's Photo Album My Photos
Some more progress. Only get small chunks of time, but it's progress. Got the runners for the sled cut, but realized I didn't have any 5/8 screws, so had to put that on hold.

So I ripped the spacer pieces for the boxes and got the two legs assemblies glued up. I used some 1" brads to hold them in place then added a clamp for good measure on either end.

Question: there's a few places on the edges where the plywood veneer split during the cut, what do you recommend for wood filler that will take stain well and blend in after its all finished without sticking out really obvious? I'd also like to use it for the nail holes after I add the end cap trim pieces.
Attached Images
  
mannadesigns is offline  
post #20 of 41 Old 04-24-2013, 11:45 AM
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx. / Somerville, TX
Posts: 3,595
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
Parsons Table

This style table is usually referred to as a Parsons table.
Being as thin as this one is, there is no decent way to affix the legs.
Below is a picture I took from C&B's website. Blow it up and you will see the metal/steel angle bracket/supports under neath it. I don't believe the manufacturer did this just for shipping reasons.
for something this thin, I would have bought a hollow core door and clad it with 1/2 Baltic Birch. I have my doubts about how rigid your top will be. Sixty inches is a long span. Test it out first. Stretch it across to blocks and sit oin the middle. That is the only way to be sure.

I have built hundreds of these Parsons tables back in the 1980's. I used a different construction method and never this thin. I never made them any thinner than 6"
Best of luck and I hope I'm wrong.
Attached Images
 

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx

Last edited by Tony B; 04-24-2013 at 11:57 AM.
Tony B is offline  
Closed Thread

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oak and Poplar Coffee Table terrysumner Project Showcase 6 09-29-2012 05:18 PM
Table Lamp - Poplar MKandyman Project Showcase 2 09-08-2012 08:38 PM
Modern coffee table and a simple shaker end table tymann09 Project Showcase 13 11-13-2011 08:38 PM
Poplar table top still feels tacky klambert510 Wood Finishing 2 02-02-2008 11:02 PM
Poplar for a table top? Al Killian General Woodworking Discussion 6 11-30-2007 05:26 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome