Cleaning burnt on resin off Router bits - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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Cleaning burnt on resin off Router bits

I spent all day routing Pine boards that were a bit damp and contained a lot of resin. Now the 2 bits I used are coated in burnt on resin that seems to defy everything I have thrown at it.

Any tips to shift the bullet proof black gunk, I have thought of trying to burn it off with a plumbers gas torch but I am worried the gunk will come off just before the brazed carbide cutting tips fall off.

Measure twice, Cut once, Then force it to fit with a big hammer.
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post #2 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 08:43 PM
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I clean resin build up from my saw blades with Fantastic or 409. I soak the blades by laying them on a trash bag, saturating the blade and covering the blade with the other half of the bag. Let soak for a few hours and scrub the teeth with a tooth brush. Rinse with warm water and dry. For router bits, I soak them in a small cup just large enough to hold the bit and then brush with a tooth brush. If the bit has a pilot bearing, remove it, lube it, and replace it when the bit is clean. I have many tooth brushes from the dentist visits every 6 months. I use an electric tooth brush, so the manual ones the dentist hands out become shop tools.

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post #3 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 09:11 PM
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Dollar Tree has loads of toothbrushes. I keep mine when they are worn out and put them in a can in the shop. When they get cruddy (is that a word?), I toss them.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #4 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 10:01 PM
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Citrus degreaser like Zep, has never failed me. For normal pine resins it only takes about 60 seconds, burnt resins might take 2 or 3 minutes. It will strip paint if you leave it on too long. Spray it on, wait a minute, hit it with a toothbrush. Rinse with water and dry.
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post #5 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 10:05 PM
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I use Simple Green & a toothbrush, rinse under hot tap water, and dry with compressed air after using paper towels on them.
I also use Dri-Cote on them.

Cheers

THE GOOD NEWS: You create your own destiny...THE BAD NEWS: You create your own destiny
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post #6 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 10:19 PM
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I'm a bit different. I use an old wood chisel to gently remove the pitch from the flat edge, then go after the profile. Quick and easy, no cleanup of soap or solvent.
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post #7 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 10:29 PM
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If you soak a bit with a ball bearing pilot in a cleaner it will clean the bearings of any lubricant. This is not good. Those little bearings need lubrication.
I clean any build-up on my bits with a small wire brush or steel wool.
Soft woods, especially soft woods with sap tend to build up residue on bits much faster than when working hardwoods.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #8 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 10:41 PM
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If I'm cleaning a carbide bit I use a soft brass wire brush on a 6" bench grinder. It will in no way dull the bit, it takes only a minute or two to do and the tool will look brand new when you're finished. No muss, no fuss. And if you cant the bit 75 or 80 degrees it'll make the bearing sparkle without it spinning much.

Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
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post #9 of 15 Old 03-23-2018, 11:24 PM
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Two things to do:
1. Buy a good quality bit as a replacement.
2. Try several of the suggested treatments on the cooked bit so you will know what to do next time.
Where I live, I'd try a good soak in Easy-Off oven cleaner.

By this point, if you place any value on your own time, you will have spent more than the price of a new bit, anyway.
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post #10 of 15 Old 03-24-2018, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
Dollar Tree has loads of toothbrushes. I keep mine when they are worn out and put them in a can in the shop. When they get cruddy (is that a word?), I toss them.
"Cruddy" Yes it's a word. At least in the south.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #11 of 15 Old 03-24-2018, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
"Cruddy" Yes it's a word. At least in the south.
In the North as well.
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post #12 of 15 Old 03-24-2018, 05:12 PM Thread Starter
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All sparkly clean now. I found a bottle of Aluminium wheel cleaner and Tar remover, filled up a glass peanut butter jar and soaked the bits for a couple of hours. The Crud fell off when rinsed in water, dried them and gave them a squirt of Teflon spray to stop any rust and hopefully make it easier to clean next time.

Measure twice, Cut once, Then force it to fit with a big hammer.
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post #13 of 15 Old 03-24-2018, 05:53 PM
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Cleaning?

There is a product 2010 or 2010 that is a spray on and biodegradable. Works great. From Mark Somerfield??? (The name is confusing as it was also the model number of a DEC computer, way back.)

Rockler has a blade cleaning solution that works great on pitch.

I've used both. The 2020 (I really think that is the name) is better but a pain to acquire. You have to go to one of the woodworking shows where Somerfield is exhibiting or mail order.

Rich
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post #14 of 15 Old 03-25-2018, 03:20 AM
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To support table saw blades, I use the cheap lid for the 5 gallon bucket from Home Depot. You don't have to buy the bucket, only the lid. The lid has an inner ring that supports the body of the blade in a way that exposes the carbide tips for soaking or brushing.

I use it when I clean the blade. I also use it when I need a place to put the blade when it is temporarily out of the saw. It protects the carbide tips from being chipped accidentally, and it protects surfaces from being scratched by the blade.

Hint: To lift out the blade, use your finger in the center hole to tilt it enough to get a safe grip with your other hand.
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post #15 of 15 Old 03-25-2018, 05:24 PM
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I like the lid idea. I use an anodized aluminum pizza pan from the dollar store and place a piece of scrap plywood or whatever under the blade to lift it up a bit.
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