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post #1 of 9 Old 09-21-2012, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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Christmas Gifts

As I read around threads on here and here people talking about making there Christmas gifts, I started thinking of them too. I like oak so I want to make something using oak. I though of a mount for a buck I shot about 10 years ago. Has anyone made one before. I don't want just a plaque but back piece with an angled platform for the skull to sit on.

I was also thinking doing of a cutting board. The oak will match the cabinets and floor. I haven't made a cutting board before so I will need some help. I think for the size, a 12x 18 would be plenty? Not an end grain cutting board. I have butcher block finish I could put on it. Again any pics of what you made would really help me out with this.
Thanks!

Last edited by BigJoe16; 09-27-2012 at 09:08 PM.
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post #2 of 9 Old 09-21-2012, 04:02 PM
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Oak us not a good choice for a cutting board as it is too open grain. A good size for a normal cutting board is about 12x16".

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #3 of 9 Old 09-21-2012, 05:40 PM
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+1 with Sawdustfactory that oak is not a good wood for cutting on.

If you want to have oak, but not for cutting, make a two sided board, one with maple, walnut, cherry etc. for cutting and the other side for decoration.

I posted this board back in June. Two sided intended to be cut on the maple side and displayed on the "curly" side.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/c...g-board-40207/

Since you asked for pictures these are a few of my boards from this year. I hope these can give you some inspiration. So many ways to make a board.

My first board with the bowtie inserts.

Christmas Gifts-dovetail_board_stripe_front.jpg

My next board with bowtie inserts. This one went smoother.

Christmas Gifts-dovetail_insert_board_top_web.jpg

I have been on a roll doing inserts, this one was square pieces of purpleheart.

Christmas Gifts-beverley_top_finished_small.jpg
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post #4 of 9 Old 09-22-2012, 12:08 AM Thread Starter
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Thank for the replys! Now I remember hearing oak isn't good for cutting boards. I wouldn't have thought of it though. I like your idea of making a 2 sided board. I really like the cutting boards you made. How did you do the bowtie inlays?

For the cutting board, I was thinking of cutting 1in think boards into 2in wide strips by 6 in long and alternating each piece. Walnut then maple then walnut. Then turning them 45 degrees and gluing them so it makes 1 board that is 2 in thick, about 6 in deep and around 16 long. Then make another one and glueing them together so I end up with a 2x12x16 finished piece. Do you know what I mean? I'll draw it tomorrow to give you a better idea.
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post #5 of 9 Old 09-22-2012, 09:20 AM
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I am not following the 45 deg detail. A sketch will help.

The bowties are not difficult with the right guide and template.

I purchased this guide for my router. I am using this with a DeWalt 611 router.

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/200...r-bit-set.aspx

I also purchased a template. You could make this yourself.
http://www.woodcraft.com/product/200...-template.aspx

The guide has a removable bushing which is critical for this task. Remove the bushing to cut the bowtie out of e.g. 1/4in thick piece, you define the depth you want to use.

ADD the bushing and place the template on the board where you want the bowtie. Then rout out the hole. You need to keep pressure against the template or else the bowtie will be mis-shapen. Happened on my first try. I recommend practice on some scrap.

The bowtie pieces have angular corners. The hole has rounded corners, so you need to do a little sanding to make them fit. Only takes a few seconds. To not oversand.

I placed tape on the template with marks for the middle of the bowtie (length and width) to assist in placement on the board.

The small router bit is not fast for removing all the stock in the hole, but it is not difficult.
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post #6 of 9 Old 09-23-2012, 12:59 PM Thread Starter
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This is what I was thinking of. I know it's a bad sketch. The colored in arenas would be the walnut and the white would be maple.
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post #7 of 9 Old 09-23-2012, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJoe16 View Post
This is what I was thinking of. I know it's a bad sketch. The colored in arenas would be the walnut and the white would be maple.
The sketch really helps, I can now understand.

The pattern looks good.

The nuance of the pattern is you now have a weak joint where the 45 deg ends meet. Not quite end grain joint, but not face grain strength.

If you go with this pattern, I would rout a slot in both halves and glue in a spline along the joint. You then have a much stronger joint.

If the pieces are not exactly the same width, there is potential for the alternate strips not to be exactly aligned.

One way to fool the eye is to glue a solid piece up the middle, this will mask any small misalignment.

I would still use a spline even with the solid piece in the middle.

You can end the spline short if you do not want it to be visible.
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post #8 of 9 Old 09-23-2012, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine

The sketch really helps, I can now understand.

The pattern looks good.

The nuance of the pattern is you now have a weak joint where the 45 deg ends meet. Not quite end grain joint, but not face grain strength.

If you go with this pattern, I would rout a slot in both halves and glue in a spline along the joint. You then have a much stronger joint.

If the pieces are not exactly the same width, there is potential for the alternate strips not to be exactly aligned.

One way to fool the eye is to glue a solid piece up the middle, this will mask any small misalignment.

I would still use a spline even with the solid piece in the middle.

You can end the spline short if you do not want it to be visible.
Thanks for helping! I like the idea of using a spline joint. I'm sure sooner or later the board will be dropped and I would hate it if it came apart. If I went with this design, can I send it threw the planer? Or does the grain need to be going in straight.
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post #9 of 9 Old 09-24-2012, 08:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJoe16 View Post
Thanks for helping! I like the idea of using a spline joint. I'm sure sooner or later the board will be dropped and I would hate it if it came apart. If I went with this design, can I send it threw the planer? Or does the grain need to be going in straight.
There is the potential for tearout if you run this through the planer. The end could chip.

I would plane the assembly before you make the 45 deg cuts. If you use the spline joint, this will also help alignment, so if all works, you should only need to be sanding the final piece.

If your planer has snipe, I would make the assembly long enough so that you can cut off the snipe.

I have a DeWalt 735 and despite the auto-locking head, I am not able to eliminate snipe. I wish this had manual lock on the heads.
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