Chip/Hole repair - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 03:28 PM Thread Starter
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Chip/Hole repair

Good afternoon, y’all. I’m new to this board and admittedly a novice in regard to woodworking.

I make custom clocks featuring different caliber bullet cartridges as the time intervals. My clocks are made out of wooden logs (Basswood).

The reason I’m making this post is to ask for advice on a repair on a current clock in production for a customer. I’m hoping I don’t need to start from scratch and that I can still salvage this piece.

It has already been stained. I was milling out the back to recess the clock movement. As I cleared out the debris, the cutter somehow caught the grain and chipped it right through. I’m not sure how to repair this, exactly, having already been stained. No lacquer or any other finishing applied yet. This took place in the beginning phases of production.

My husband just picked up “Elmer’s Carpenters Wood Filler” off the advice of a friend in the construction/carpentry business. I’m unsure if this is the right thing to use. Do I mix stain in with this wood filler and apply, or apply and let it dry, then stain/sand and hope to achieve the desired color to match?

I appreciate any advice given!

Pics attached are the front and back of the work piece, and an example of my product for better understanding.



Jerrica
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Jerrica

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http://eccoclocksandcrafts.store on Etsy
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post #2 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 03:38 PM
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are you through sanding the front side ?
if so, then you can sand the back side and safe the sanding dust.
mix with clear epoxy and tightly pack it into the hole (carefully).
then sand smooth after it has firmly cured. even Super Glue (CA)
will work well. put tape on the front side and pack with dust on the
back side and add the CA glue. keep adding dust until the hole is full.
if that is not acceptable, Découpage a photo of a hunting scene over
the face to keep with the gun theme. (that may be an additional style
to add to your projects list).
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-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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post #3 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 04:08 PM
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Do you have an adjacent slide from that log? If so, cut a thin slice and chip out a piece of the stock and with a sharp knife cut it to fit. Cutting away at a short length of end grain wood is exceptionally easy. Once you have your plug sized correctly, glue it in with wood glue, sand it flat. Use some of the sanding dust to make some wood filler to fill in the minute gaps.

It reminds me of the re-weaving on expensive suits and jackets. The re-weaver would harvest some threads from parts of the jacket that were not visible and he would weave in the threads to fill the hole or tear.
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post #4 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 04:18 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
are you through sanding the front side ?
if so, then you can sand the back side and safe the sanding dust.
mix with clear epoxy and tightly pack it into the hole (carefully).
then sand smooth after it has firmly cured. even Super Glue (CA)
will work well. put tape on the front side and pack with dust on the
back side and add the CA glue. keep adding dust until the hole is full.
if that is not acceptable, Découpage a photo of a hunting scene over
the face to keep with the gun theme. (that may be an additional style
to add to your projects list).
Thank you John for replying. What grit sandpaper would you suggest to save the sanding dust from, if I am sanding the backside? The backside has not been stained, just the front side.
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post #5 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 04:22 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Packard View Post
Do you have an adjacent slide from that log? If so, cut a thin slice and chip out a piece of the stock and with a sharp knife cut it to fit. Cutting away at a short length of end grain wood is exceptionally easy. Once you have your plug sized correctly, glue it in with wood glue, sand it flat. Use some of the sanding dust to make some wood filler to fill in the minute gaps.

It reminds me of the re-weaving on expensive suits and jackets. The re-weaver would harvest some threads from parts of the jacket that were not visible and he would weave in the threads to fill the hole or tear.
Apologies for the unfamiliarity with the lexicon. By slide, are you referencing an adjacent piece or perhaps a scrap wood section from where the log was cut? If so, I do not. I have other wooden logs and pieces of, but of a different species.

Would the Wood Filler that my husband brought home be an acceptable substitute? It seems to be "stain-able" upon researching a bit. Just unsure if I should premix stain in it before application, or re-stain my whole piece after the wood filler dries.
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post #6 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 04:29 PM
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as for using wood filler and stains, it is always the best practice
to become familiar with the products by experimenting on like
materials prior to performing it on the real project.

any sander with a collection bag will work.
palm sander, R/O, belt sander, etc.
when you are sanding same color woods, save the dust
in small jars or zip-top bags for such occasions.
if you don't have any power sanders now, a block of wood
with 100 grit paper wrapped around it will give you enough dust
for this issue. . . . but, think towards the future. start saving the dust
you think you may need as well as splinters and small bits of wood.
I have had good success with the syringe style clear 5 min. epoxy
and thick super glue. be aware that both do not accept stain very well.
so you may need to be creative in the repairs you need to do.
or - set that piece aside and make another one.
it is part of the learning curve ~ we all pay our dues in one way or another.

if you are talking about the hole in the yellow circle, with the tab of wood
still attached, that should be an easy fix that would not be noticeable once
hung on the wall.
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-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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post #7 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 04:42 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
as for using wood filler and stains, it is always the best practice
to become familiar with the products by experimenting on like
materials prior to performing it on the real project.

any sander with a collection bag will work.
palm sander, R/O, belt sander, etc.
when you are sanding same color woods, save the dust
in small jars or zip-top bags for such occasions.
if you don't have any power sanders now, a block of wood
with 100 grit paper wrapped around it will give you enough dust
for this issue. . . . but, think towards the future. start saving the dust
you think you may need as well as splinters and small bits of wood.
I have had good success with the syringe style clear 5 min. epoxy
and thick super glue. be aware that both do not accept stain very well.
so you may need to be creative in the repairs you need to do.
or - set that piece aside and make another one.
it is part of the learning curve ~ we all pay our dues in one way or another.

if you are talking about the hole in the yellow circle, with the tab of wood
still attached, that should be an easy fix that would not be noticeable once
hung on the wall.
I really appreciate the tips! I have a Porter Cable sheet sander. I do believe I still have the dust still in the collection bag from my most recent project. Also, when I milled away the back of the clock to seat the movement in, it generates a lot of chips and such, which I can collect to use for this purpose. I use the two part epoxy that is syringed into a dish to mix in which sets in 5 minutes to secure my brass to the face of the clocks. Is this the same type you're recommending?

Otherwise, I have considered getting a thin sheet of either copper or brass and creating perhaps a large enough center plate incorporated into the design. The cartridges I am using on this one are brass cases and copper bullets. I just don't want it to scream "cover up" in doing so, if my repair methods fail.

The stain on this piece is a dark walnut, so that's why I have the concern about the repair taking the same color. It'll largely be covered by the clock hands, but as with all clocks, the hands will move away from there regularly and have some exposure to be visible.

Jerrica

Rustic décor for the firearms enthusiast!
http://eccoclocksandcrafts.store on Etsy
Follow my shop: Facebook.com/ECCOClocksandCrafts
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post #8 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 04:43 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
as for using wood filler and stains, it is always the best practice
to become familiar with the products by experimenting on like
materials prior to performing it on the real project.

any sander with a collection bag will work.
palm sander, R/O, belt sander, etc.
when you are sanding same color woods, save the dust
in small jars or zip-top bags for such occasions.
if you don't have any power sanders now, a block of wood
with 100 grit paper wrapped around it will give you enough dust
for this issue. . . . but, think towards the future. start saving the dust
you think you may need as well as splinters and small bits of wood.
I have had good success with the syringe style clear 5 min. epoxy
and thick super glue. be aware that both do not accept stain very well.
so you may need to be creative in the repairs you need to do.
or - set that piece aside and make another one.
it is part of the learning curve ~ we all pay our dues in one way or another.

if you are talking about the hole in the yellow circle, with the tab of wood
still attached, that should be an easy fix that would not be noticeable once
hung on the wall.
Yes sir, it is the spot you circled in yellow that I need to fix.

Jerrica

Rustic décor for the firearms enthusiast!
http://eccoclocksandcrafts.store on Etsy
Follow my shop: Facebook.com/ECCOClocksandCrafts
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post #9 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 05:16 PM
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ask 10 people what their favorite items for repairs are
and you will get at least 15 different answers.
these two items are always in my desk drawer.
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post #10 of 17 Old 03-11-2019, 08:31 PM
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It appears your router bit isn't very sharp. With all the tearing of the grain around the parameter it's no wonder some of the end grain pulled out.

The piece that is there I would glue back into place with wood glue. From there I would cover the front with tape and work wood putty in from the back. Apply the putty in thin layers because it would take a very long time for the putty to harden if it is thick. Once it is filled and dry remove the tape from the front and see what it looks like. If it has some voids still there mask around the hole and put another coat of putty on from the front. When that is dry you can lightly sand the surface smooth. Try not to sand the stain off the wood, just the putty. From there wipe some stain over the entire face and see if the putty matches in color. You might have to mix some gray paint to supplement the color. When you get the appearance you desire apply what ever finish you like.
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post #11 of 17 Old 03-12-2019, 08:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyECCO View Post
Apologies for the unfamiliarity with the lexicon. By slide, are you referencing an adjacent piece or perhaps a scrap wood section from where the log was cut? If so, I do not. I have other wooden logs and pieces of, but of a different species.

Would the Wood Filler that my husband brought home be an acceptable substitute? It seems to be "stain-able" upon researching a bit. Just unsure if I should premix stain in it before application, or re-stain my whole piece after the wood filler dries.

That was a typo. It should have read "slice".
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post #12 of 17 Old 03-12-2019, 02:01 PM
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another approach .....

It appears to me those "blow outs" were a natural condition that only took a small force to have fall away. I have never had any luck matching colors od wood in a repair withsnding dust and wood glue. I would take a different approach and make them into realistic knots, rather than a mis-matched repair. This means making them darker just like the real knots in the top photo:








I would experiment with the 5 minute epoxy by mixing up some dust from the same wood and coloring it with ground up charcoal or India ink, or black paint. You would have to find the right combination so it matches the other knots.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

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post #13 of 17 Old 04-18-2019, 08:09 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all so much for your feedback and suggestions. I know I am a bit delayed in responding back. I was successfully able to use a wood filler and it took the stain quite well. It just looks like a knot in the wood, like some of the others. You'd never know it was a hole. I am quite grateful that this worked out!

I will come back and post some pics of the finished ammo clock once I have completed it.

Jerrica

Rustic décor for the firearms enthusiast!
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post #14 of 17 Old 04-18-2019, 08:28 PM
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LOL, if it was an ammo clock maybe you should have made the hole look like a bullet hole.
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post #15 of 17 Old 04-19-2019, 12:31 AM Thread Starter
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LOL, if it was an ammo clock maybe you should have made the hole look like a bullet hole.
Haha, I like the way you think! Hindsight is 20/20, right?

I was so upset that this happened though. This clock is going to be the “shop clock” for the gun store locally that carries my products exclusively. I’ve thought about cutting head stamps from cartridges and placing them where the hole was and around that area in a circle or something to mask the blemish and make it look intentional. But alas, I opted for a form of wood repair with a filler. Seems to have worked well.

You’ve given me an idea for future products though. My husband builds custom suppressors. I almost am tempted to take a piece of my wood to the range and make a clock from the remains after target practice...

Jerrica

Rustic décor for the firearms enthusiast!
http://eccoclocksandcrafts.store on Etsy
Follow my shop: Facebook.com/ECCOClocksandCrafts
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post #16 of 17 Old 04-19-2019, 10:09 AM
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Haha, I like the way you think! Hindsight is 20/20, right?

I was so upset that this happened though. This clock is going to be the “shop clock” for the gun store locally that carries my products exclusively. I’ve thought about cutting head stamps from cartridges and placing them where the hole was and around that area in a circle or something to mask the blemish and make it look intentional. But alas, I opted for a form of wood repair with a filler. Seems to have worked well.

You’ve given me an idea for future products though. My husband builds custom suppressors. I almost am tempted to take a piece of my wood to the range and make a clock from the remains after target practice...
Here you go, dig the putty out and make some more holes to fill.
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post #17 of 17 Old 04-19-2019, 11:36 AM
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Perhaps you can glue a very thin slice from a 1" or 2" diameter branch to cover that imperfection. It would look perfectly natural considering what the clock face if made from.
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