Cherry finish flooring - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 12:58 PM Thread Starter
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Cherry finish flooring




Hey guy have a question?
Every time I try turning this wood to make handles even with a face shield on my face starts burning and my four arms any reason why I tossed it donít want to work with it also smells weird..
Thank you Freddy
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post #2 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 03:31 PM
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This is cherry?

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post #3 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 05:15 PM Thread Starter
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This is cherry?

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Yes this is cherry finish flooring I got from I job I did a couple of weeks ago.
I must say this species of wood is not a good wood turner it burns my skin especially my face..


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post #4 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 05:33 PM
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I'm just speculating...
But cherry wood has arsenic in it. It is all throughout the tissue of the wood.

That being said, I've always thought that it respirated out during processing. But my experience with this is from a different application.
I'm speculating that you have an allergy to that compound.
Perhaps someone will know more specifically...

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post #5 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 06:55 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t.carpenter00 View Post
I'm just speculating...
But cherry wood has arsenic in it. It is all throughout the tissue of the wood.

That being said, I've always thought that it respirated out during processing. But my experience with this is from a different application.
I'm speculating that you have an allergy to that compound.
Perhaps someone will know more specifically...

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Thank you very appreciated just asking donít want something happening to me while alone in my shop so I stopped turning that wood for now...


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post #6 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 07:50 PM
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You might check specifics on that idea, but I know it does have arsnick (so does walnut, I believe).

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post #7 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by JRboostGSR View Post
Yes this is cherry finish flooring I got from I job I did a couple of weeks ago.
I must say this species of wood is not a good wood turner it burns my skin especially my face..


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It may be a cherry finish, which just means reddish stain, but the wood is something else. If it is hard my guess it is sande. If that is what it is then it's a terrible wood to work with. It's bad to tear out and very abrasive to cutting tools.

As far as the burning, a person can be allergic to one or more species of wood where it wouldn't have the same affect to another person.
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post #8 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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It may be a cherry finish, which just means reddish stain, but the wood is something else. If it is hard my guess it is sande. If that is what it is then it's a terrible wood to work with. It's bad to tear out and very abrasive to cutting tools.



As far as the burning, a person can be allergic to one or more species of wood where it wouldn't have the same affect to another person.


Also itís very hard to cut I started to do a project with it before all the burning on my skin but my table saw started to blow a lot of smoke saw was slowing up I just stopped and started to turn it thatís when my skin started to burn.my cheeks and arms.
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post #9 of 21 Old 08-19-2018, 10:36 PM
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Also itís very hard to cut I started to do a project with it before all the burning on my skin but my table saw started to blow a lot of smoke saw was slowing up I just stopped and started to turn it thatís when my skin started to burn.my cheeks and arms.
Freddy


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Sande is hard but wouldn't smoke when cut unless your tools are dull. If your blades are sharp it must be something else.
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post #10 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 02:39 AM
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To those who said that cherry contains arsenic, would you please provide a source?

I was surprised to read it. Arsenic is a toxic heavy metal. Are they saying that the cherry tree somehow selectively draws arsenic from the soil and then somehow concentrates it in the wood? That does not ring true to me for many reasons. Soil with that much arsenic in it would have its own serious environmental issues.

In addition, we must also say that the tree keeps all traces of arsenic out of its fruit. As a toxic heavy metal, arsenic builds up in the body. We would not be eating cherries if there were almost any measurable level of arsenic in them.

I learned that cherry is popular for wood pipe stems. I doubt that it would be used for that purpose if it contained any measurable arsenic at all. I have seen many cutting boards that include cherry. I am sure that many warnings would have gone out if the cherry cutting boards had a measurable level of arsenic.

By coincidence, the book I am currently reading is "The Encyclopedia of Wood". It is sitting right next to me. I looked at every page that mentioned "cherry" from the index, and found no mention of arsenic.

My web searches did not turn up any research or other reasonable source that associates anything related to cherry with arsenic.

I learned that the seeds (pits) of the cherry fruit contain a substance called amygdalin, which is toxic. The same is true for apple seeds and apricot pits.

Based on what I learned above, coupled with my own experience, I believe that cherry wood does not contain arsenic, at least not at levels above what is in the general environment.

@JRboostGSR's experience with skin sensitivity could be many things, and it would be helpful to ask a doctor. They would probably test for allergies early on. Since it could be an allergy, it would be best to avoid further exposure until he/she knows more about their reaction to cherry.

If the wood isn't cherry, it could still be an allergen or cause other problems. Regardless of what kind of wood it is, could it have been coated or impregnated with some other substance?
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post #11 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 09:03 AM Thread Starter
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To those who said that cherry contains arsenic, would you please provide a source?



I was surprised to read it. Arsenic is a toxic heavy metal. Are they saying that the cherry tree somehow selectively draws arsenic from the soil and then somehow concentrates it in the wood? That does not ring true to me for many reasons. Soil with that much arsenic in it would have its own serious environmental issues.



In addition, we must also say that the tree keeps all traces of arsenic out of its fruit. As a toxic heavy metal, arsenic builds up in the body. We would not be eating cherries if there were almost any measurable level of arsenic in them.



I learned that cherry is popular for wood pipe stems. I doubt that it would be used for that purpose if it contained any measurable arsenic at all. I have seen many cutting boards that include cherry. I am sure that many warnings would have gone out if the cherry cutting boards had a measurable level of arsenic.



By coincidence, the book I am currently reading is "The Encyclopedia of Wood". It is sitting right next to me. I looked at every page that mentioned "cherry" from the index, and found no mention of arsenic.



My web searches did not turn up any research or other reasonable source that associates anything related to cherry with arsenic.



I learned that the seeds (pits) of the cherry fruit contain a substance called amygdalin, which is toxic. The same is true for apple seeds and apricot pits.



Based on what I learned above, coupled with my own experience, I believe that cherry wood does not contain arsenic, at least not at levels above what is in the general environment.


@JRboostGSR's experience with skin sensitivity could be many things, and it would be helpful to ask a doctor. They would probably test for allergies early on. Since it could be an allergy, it would be best to avoid further exposure until he/she knows more about their reaction to cherry.



If the wood isn't cherry, it could still be an allergen or cause other problems. Regardless of what kind of wood it is, could it have been coated or impregnated with some other substance?


Thank you for all advice greatly appreciated.your fellow wood worker Freddy
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post #12 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 09:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
To those who said that cherry contains arsenic, would you please provide a source?

I was surprised to read it. Arsenic is a toxic heavy metal. Are they saying that the cherry tree somehow selectively draws arsenic from the soil and then somehow concentrates it in the wood? That does not ring true to me for many reasons. Soil with that much arsenic in it would have its own serious environmental issues.

In addition, we must also say that the tree keeps all traces of arsenic out of its fruit. As a toxic heavy metal, arsenic builds up in the body. We would not be eating cherries if there were almost any measurable level of arsenic in them.

I learned that cherry is popular for wood pipe stems. I doubt that it would be used for that purpose if it contained any measurable arsenic at all. I have seen many cutting boards that include cherry. I am sure that many warnings would have gone out if the cherry cutting boards had a measurable level of arsenic.

By coincidence, the book I am currently reading is "The Encyclopedia of Wood". It is sitting right next to me. I looked at every page that mentioned "cherry" from the index, and found no mention of arsenic.

My web searches did not turn up any research or other reasonable source that associates anything related to cherry with arsenic.

I learned that the seeds (pits) of the cherry fruit contain a substance called amygdalin, which is toxic. The same is true for apple seeds and apricot pits.

Based on what I learned above, coupled with my own experience, I believe that cherry wood does not contain arsenic, at least not at levels above what is in the general environment.

@JRboostGSR's experience with skin sensitivity could be many things, and it would be helpful to ask a doctor. They would probably test for allergies early on. Since it could be an allergy, it would be best to avoid further exposure until he/she knows more about their reaction to cherry.

If the wood isn't cherry, it could still be an allergen or cause other problems. Regardless of what kind of wood it is, could it have been coated or impregnated with some other substance?
You are right, cherry doesn't contain arsenic, it contains hydrogen cyanide but the levels are so low people use it for smoking meats with no ill effect. Certainly not high enough to harm the woodworker unless perhaps they had a career where they were working only cherry wood seven days a week.
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post #13 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 10:17 AM
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Whatever you call it, it's strong enough to kill cows if theyeat the leaves or wood. In my past life I used to grind trees. It was the primary worry we had when working around pastures. Had to pick up every splinter. If that's what the compound is, thanks for being specific. It's been quite awhile since I had to come up with that thought.


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post #14 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 10:20 AM
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I might add that I'm talking about wild cherry trees. People don't eat the fruit. And, as I pointed out, when using the chips people usually smoke with, the syanide will respirated out of the wood within about 72 hours. But board stock, I don't know.

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post #15 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 04:08 PM
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I've made mallets and bowls out of cherry, it turns very nicely. It doesn't have a weird smell, and the grain doesn't look like the pics. I suspect it's something else with a cherry stain. Anybody wager a guess as to what wood could cause Freddy's sensitivity?
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post #16 of 21 Old 08-20-2018, 04:23 PM
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Don't think that's cherry, and you're probably allergic to it. Either that or the wood itself was soaked in some caustic/irritant chemical
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post #17 of 21 Old 08-21-2018, 12:35 PM
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Just to be clear:

Cherry pits contain a toxic substance called amygdalin, which is also found in other fruit seeds and pits. When ingested by humans, amygdalin releases cyanide into the body, leading to cyanide poisoning. Other people above mentioned cyanide. It comes from amygdalin.

Amygdalin, cyanide, and arsenic are different substances. They are all toxic to humans. Amygdalin is a source of cyanide. Cherry trees produce amygdalin, which can lead to cyanide poisoning if ingested by humans.

Cherry trees (and other trees) do not create or concentrate arsenic. As far as I can tell, there is no relationship between trees and arsenic, other than the trace levels that are normally found in the environment.

I agree that the most likely cause of @JRboostGSR's skin irritation is an allergic or chemical reaction to the wood or a substance embedded in the wood. As I suggested earlier, the best thing to do is avoid further exposure until JRboostGSR can visit a doctor to determine the source of the problem and the best solution, which is probably: "Avoid further exposure to this wood." Hopefully the problem is associated with only this one batch of wood and is not a long term issue for JRboostGSR. I have heard of some woodworkers who have become so sensitive that they have had to retire from woodworking altogether.
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post #18 of 21 Old 08-21-2018, 06:56 PM
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I reckon possibly bamboo

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post #19 of 21 Old 08-21-2018, 11:41 PM
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I reckon possibly bamboo

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Probably not. Bamboo has "knuckles" every coupe of feet and there's no sign of those here.

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post #20 of 21 Old 08-21-2018, 11:45 PM
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Mahogany?

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