Can I use a Blue Spruce for furniture? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 2Likes
  • 1 Post By Gilgaron
  • 1 Post By Tony B
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 10-31-2012, 07:33 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2
View TrevorCiovacco's Photo Album My Photos
Can I use a Blue Spruce for furniture?

A blue spruce pine, that's a staple of the house a grew up in, recently fell over in a hurricane on the East Coast.

I was wondering if it's worth saving to use for a future project.
I want to use it for anything that will work, but I was really hoping to turn it into a butcherblock countertop for my kitchen.

Anyone know if this is a possibility? Or what my options are?
TrevorCiovacco is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 10-31-2012, 07:49 PM
Sawdust Creator
 
ryan50hrl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 8,047
View ryan50hrl's Photo Album My Photos
I'm guessing you won't want to use pine for counter tops... its going to be too soft for that. However, if its good wood I wouldn't just throw it out.....
ryan50hrl is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 10-31-2012, 07:52 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Blue spruce and pine are two different species but either can be used for furniture. I think it would be too soft for the butcherblock. Unless it just has sentimental value I think you will find out it's more trouble to turn into lumber and season it than it's worth. I can't offer any suggestions. I think the wood will be to bland to turn into cookies.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 10-31-2012, 08:39 PM
master sawdust maker
 
Wema826's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Brush Creek tn (1 hour east of Nashville
Posts: 437
View Wema826's Photo Album My Photos
being that it is a soft wood, could it be possible to use it to make shop furniture? I:E bench tops, shelving, cabinet frames? it would be put to good use and you would see it every time you're in your shop!

John,

Confidence does not come from always being right. It comes from not being afraid to be wrong.
Wema826 is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 10-31-2012, 09:43 PM
Senior Member
 
mike1950's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Eastern Washington
Posts: 1,652
View mike1950's Photo Album My Photos
Does it have a lot of limbs- if so it wont make very good lumber.
mike1950 is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 10-31-2012, 11:22 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 576
View Midlandbob's Photo Album My Photos
Most spruce has pitch pockets also. Is is not a good wood for most all but more rustic furniture. Some have had interesting results turning whole chunks of spruce with a row of knots around the perimeter.
A lot of construction wood is cut from spruce in Canada.
Midlandbob is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Midlandbob For This Useful Post:
mike1950 (11-01-2012)
post #7 of 16 Old 11-01-2012, 09:47 AM
Senior Member
 
mike1950's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Eastern Washington
Posts: 1,652
View mike1950's Photo Album My Photos
I have some Sitka spruce from canada- 3"x20"x9' and no knots or flaws. They are quite a bit different tree. I got some blue spruce boards for free- almost solid knots, ended up as fire wood..........
mike1950 is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 11-02-2012, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2
View TrevorCiovacco's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the responses.

It has a lot of sentimental value, so I'm going to dry it out and see where it goes from there.

My dream is to turn it into an endgrain butcher block countertop, but it being a very soft wood, I know its going to be a challenge. I just like the idea of getting everyday use,for the whole family to appreciate, out of a tree that means a lot to us.

Someone suggested using the roots and stump to make a coffee table, anyone have experience with a project like that?
TrevorCiovacco is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 11-02-2012, 10:49 AM
Senior Member
 
Gilgaron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 911
View Gilgaron's Photo Album My Photos
You could also consider different kitchen knick knacks if the yield ends up being low... a jelly cupboard, cookbook holder, papertowel holder, or even a knife block where the softness either wouldn't matter or would be a plus.
TimPa likes this.
Gilgaron is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 04-19-2019, 11:16 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 3
View JMacFadden's Photo Album My Photos
Hi my Mom just had a large Blue Spruce limb fall. I appreciate all of the ideas. I would like to help her have a keepsake piece from the limb. The comments above will be helpful.



Julie

Wrightsville, PA
JMacFadden is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 04-19-2019, 11:26 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMacFadden View Post
Hi my Mom just had a large Blue Spruce limb fall. I appreciate all of the ideas. I would like to help her have a keepsake piece from the limb. The comments above will be helpful.



Julie

Wrightsville, PA
It's difficult to make something from a limb like that. If the limb was alive when it was broken off it could take many years before it was really stable enough to use. A lot depends on the size of the limb. What you need to do is figure out what you want to make and roughly cut it out for that. This would allow it to dry quicker. If it is a large limb the ends would need to be coated with something like Anchorseal or gulf wax to prevent the ends from drying too fast. When wood dries too fast it causes the ends to crack and split. This happens sometimes anyway but you could reduce the severity by coating the ends. Just so you know there is a general rule of thumb for wood cut into lumber it takes a year for every inch thickness for the wood to dry enough to use. For a limb with the bark on it that timeframe would be a lot longer.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 04-19-2019, 12:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Dickinson, Tx. / Somerville, TX
Posts: 3,462
View Tony B's Photo Album My Photos
Get a lathe and try turning Christmas ornaments and candle sticks. After the wood settles to 8%Moisture Content (which could take a year or more sitting indoors), you might be able to get some straight pieces for small picture frames.
BTW, if you get a lathe, you could become addicted. Nothing more relaxing than watching concentric circles and letting your chisels and gouges flow with the wood. You been warned.
JMacFadden likes this.

Tony B



Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx
Tony B is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 04-20-2019, 01:08 AM
Former Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,511
View 35015's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrevorCiovacco View Post
A blue spruce pine...recently fell over in a hurricane on the East Coast...I was wondering if it's worth saving to use for a future project.
I would have to see pictures of the tree/log to give you a better answer, but yes its worth saving, especially if it has intrinsic value to you...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrevorCiovacco View Post
...I want to use it for anything that will work, but I was really hoping to turn it into a butcherblock countertop for my kitchen...Anyone know if this is a possibility? Or what my options are?
Yes...to the first question...and "many options" to the second...

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrevorCiovacco View Post
...Someone suggested using the roots and stump to make a coffee table, anyone have experience with a project like that?
Yes, I have experience with just projects.

Much of what your asking is not in the realm of common woodworking practice today (modern time thinking) as it was a standard practice in the past.

Drying out the wood isn't even a necessity if one embraces the more traditional methods of woodworking, but again, these are different standards, approaches and skill sets within woodworking that most do not practice today...

Let me know if I can expand on anything...

j
35015 is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 04-20-2019, 01:13 AM
Former Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,511
View 35015's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMacFadden View Post
Hi my Mom just had a large Blue Spruce limb fall. I appreciate all of the ideas. I would like to help her have a keepsake piece from the limb. The comments above will be helpful...Julie
Hello Julie,

Yes you can use "limb wood" to make all manner of useful thing...

From kitchen utensil to other items of use and aesthetic beauty. The skill sets are primarily traditional as are the tools that make most of these from my perspective and what I do in woodworking...

I must share that "limb wood" is notoriously reactionary in nature as wood goes. It is also best worked "green" and not seasoned for most utilitarian applications.

To employ it dried will take a number of years and a larger sized limb.

Pictures would be helpful...

j
35015 is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 04-22-2019, 10:23 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 3
View JMacFadden's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for the advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's difficult to make something from a limb like that. If the limb was alive when it was broken off it could take many years before it was really stable enough to use. A lot depends on the size of the limb. What you need to do is figure out what you want to make and roughly cut it out for that. This would allow it to dry quicker. If it is a large limb the ends would need to be coated with something like Anchorseal or gulf wax to prevent the ends from drying too fast. When wood dries too fast it causes the ends to crack and split. This happens sometimes anyway but you could reduce the severity by coating the ends. Just so you know there is a general rule of thumb for wood cut into lumber it takes a year for every inch thickness for the wood to dry enough to use. For a limb with the bark on it that timeframe would be a lot longer.
Steve, thank you for the advice. Julie
JMacFadden is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 04-22-2019, 10:26 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 3
View JMacFadden's Photo Album My Photos
Blue Spruce

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay C. White Cloud View Post
Hello Julie,

Yes you can use "limb wood" to make all manner of useful thing...

From kitchen utensil to other items of use and aesthetic beauty. The skill sets are primarily traditional as are the tools that make most of these from my perspective and what I do in woodworking...

I must share that "limb wood" is notoriously reactionary in nature as wood goes. It is also best worked "green" and not seasoned for most utilitarian applications.

To employ it dried will take a number of years and a larger sized limb.

Pictures would be helpful...

j
Jay thank you. I will make sure to send a picture. Julie
JMacFadden is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Where to buy spruce on line ecologito General Woodworking Discussion 9 05-25-2019 12:11 PM
Spruce question?? mike1950 General Woodworking Discussion 0 08-21-2011 11:17 AM
Workbench from spruce ?? bondfan General Woodworking Discussion 2 03-13-2010 01:27 PM
Norway spruce Daren Forestry & Milling 8 08-17-2009 12:21 AM
Blue Dog Custom Furniture bluedog11 New Member Introductions 1 12-05-2007 03:16 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome