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post #21 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 02:38 PM
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Like CPS said - pt wood is wet and it will dry and it will warp and it will split...

I like Danish oil and it should be fine - but consider spar varnish. You have time to decide so look around and make a good decision you'll be happy with.

CPS - you mentioned a split top bench - if you decide that is what you want - take a look at Chris Curl's bench here on woodworking talk.com He modified the same version bench you mentioned. Look at his and link to him if you have questions. He's a nice guy and I'm sure he would be willing to help you. Here is his bench http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/s...benches-51807/

Good luck to you both...

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #22 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 02:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BernieL
Like CPS said - pt wood is wet and it will dry and it will warp and it will split...

I like Danish oil and it should be fine - but consider spar varnish. You have time to decide so look around and make a good decision you'll be happy with.

CPS - you mentioned a split top bench - if you decide that is what you want - take a look at Chris Curl's bench here on woodworking talk.com He modified the same version bench you mentioned. Look at his and link to him if you have questions. He's a nice guy and I'm sure he would be willing to help you. Here is his bench http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/s...benches-51807/

Good luck to you both...
Thanks Bernie
I will definitely take both of your advice and stay away from the pressure treated stuff. Man I just found out my bolts alone for my plan will cost 54 bucks! Makes me want to just use wood screws. I'll probably still bolt it. Just might have to build the frame first and put the top on later. I probably won't make the finish too fancy. If I do I'll be OCD about keeping it clean and working on it. Want it to look good but not so good I'm afraid to work on it and nasty it up.
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post #23 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 02:52 PM
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I thought about waiting for the planer but I have the cash for the material so I kind of want to do it now. I did find some hand planers that weren't too pricey. I really want the big rigid or dewalt planer but it will be a while until I have 500 bucks. I'm kind of hoping to be able to just sand it down well enough that it looks good.

I am going to laminate the wood, so I really want a flat surface. I have laminated 1x S4S before without too much trouble, but 2x may be more of an issue if there is any cupping. This is the reason I am waiting on the planer. I have a few other small projects I am going to work on in the meantime.
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post #24 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 02:59 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by cps


I am going to laminate the wood, so I really want a flat surface. I have laminated 1x S4S before without too much trouble, but 2x may be more of an issue if there is any cupping. This is the reason I am waiting on the planer. I have a few other small projects I am going to work on in the meantime.
That sounds cool. I've never done that before but would enjoy learning how to. I'm doing the plywood and hard board on top. I'm thinking that will make it pretty flat without having to work any wood. I would like to have a wooden top for looks but thought this might be a little easier and if the hard board gets jacked up over the years I can just replace it do you think the plywood and hard board top should give me a pretty flat surface?
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post #25 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 03:02 PM Thread Starter
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Oh also does anyone do rabbeting joints? Until I buy it make a good finger joint jig I think I'll go with the rabbeting. My question about rabbeting is about the router blades. I think I have a small one but most of the wood I'll use is 1in, 3/4 and 1/4 in thickness. Do I buy the bit size the same size as the thickness as the wood? Or can I use a straight bit that is the same size as the wood thickness and just run the edges. What do you guys recommend or what advice can you give me. I have to get away from butt joints. Getting tired of them and I think rabbeting looks better and fits better until I can start making finger joints of course
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post #26 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 03:27 PM
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When I've routed rabbets I routed it on its face with multiple passes rather than route it on end as you describe. So I just use a straight bit of whatever size and then make passes until I'm done. Can also be done on a table saw.

You may find http://www.amazon.com/Joint-Book-Complete-Guide-Joinery/dp/0785822275useful. It has multiple joint types and describes how to use either power or hand tools to accomplish them.
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post #27 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
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When I've routed rabbets I routed it on its face with multiple passes rather than route it on end as you describe. So I just use a straight bit of whatever size and then make passes until I'm done. Can also be done on a table saw.

You may find Video Link: http://www.amazon.com/Joint-Book-Complete-Guide-Joinery/dp/0785822275useful. It has multiple joint types and describes how to use either power or hand tools to accomplish them.
Thanks that answered my question. Wasn't sure if I needed to spend the cash on rabbeting bits or if my straight bits will do fine. I actually just bought a table saw so haven't done much with it yet but plan to get a dado set and start learning that
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post #28 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 03:55 PM
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correction

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I got Schwarz’s book “Workbench Design Book: The Art & Philosophy of Building Better Benches”, which is a follow up to “Workbenches: From Design & Theory to Construction & Use”. I have learned a lot reading this book. It also has plans for nine benches.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1440310408/ref=oh_details_o08_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

FYI, I plan on using Yellow Southern Pine as I don’t have a cheap source of hardwood here.
That was the book I read - the newer one. Def. worth reading. It's what prompted me to get the Douglas Fir boards, as SYP is not cheap around here and I learned how stiff the stuff really is.
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post #29 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 04:13 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by railaw

That was the book I read - the newer one. Def. worth reading. It's what prompted me to get the Douglas Fir boards, as SYP is not cheap around here and I learned how stiff the stuff really is.
How good are fir boards? That stuff is dirt cheap here. Syp isn't expensive here but it's not exactly cheap either.
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post #30 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 05:13 PM
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How good are fir boards? That stuff is dirt cheap here. Syp isn't expensive here but it's not exactly cheap either.
Well after reading the book I did some looking at the various properties of wood and learned a little bit about the Janka hardness scale as well as the stiffness of wood (there are some other properties that are measured in various ways as well). Depending on the species of SYP, Doug Fir is nearly as hard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janka_hardness_test, and quite stiff http://www.woodworkweb.com/woodwork-...strengths.html. If I had my druthers I'd use hard maple or ash for aesthetic reasons but its just too expensive.

The book talks a lot about moisture content, which seems quite important, and is very practical.
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post #31 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 05:25 PM
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The book talks a lot about moisture content, which seems quite important, and is very practical.
Yes whatever wood you purchase has moisture. The wood will gain, or typically loose moisture to reach equilibrium with the moisture in the shop/house.

The movement of moisture can result in a straight board when purchased changing shape. The more moisure which moves, the greater the shape change.

It is best to let the wood acclimate for a few weeks. Easier to work around/fix shape changes before using the boards.

Doug Fir can be used in a bench, as in this bench built by Sarge240 earlier in the year.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/wo...ncluded-54721/

I am not fond of using Doug Fir. The grain may run in a manner that can cause large splinters if you are not careful on which direction to plane, sand, etc.

FYI, Sarge240 made his bench with mostly hand tools.
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post #32 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by railaw

Well after reading the book I did some looking at the various properties of wood and learned a little bit about the Janka hardness scale as well as the stiffness of wood (there are some other properties that are measured in various ways as well). Depending on the species of SYP, Doug Fir is nearly as hard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janka_hardness_test, and quite stiff http://www.woodworkweb.com/woodwork-...strengths.html. If I had my druthers I'd use hard maple or ash for aesthetic reasons but its just too expensive.

The book talks a lot about moisture content, which seems quite important, and is very practical.
Pretty interesting stuff
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post #33 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 08:37 PM
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If you're looking to go cheap, I can vouch for fir. Built a bench last winter with 4x4 Doug fir legs and stretchers. They had 8 footers at Home Depot for like 12 bucks. I found enough good ones in about 15 minutes. Its a bit light, but I spent less than $100 on the frame.
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post #34 of 34 Old 09-04-2013, 08:47 PM Thread Starter
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If you're looking to go cheap, I can vouch for fir. Built a bench last winter with 4x4 Doug fir legs and stretchers. They had 8 footers at Home Depot for like 12 bucks. I found enough good ones in about 15 minutes. Its a bit light, but I spent less than $100 on the frame.
That's not bad. I'm actually at HD now and found some syp 4x4 for 12 and will need to buy two not too bad
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