Box joints in the end of a long board - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 04-05-2020, 08:42 PM Thread Starter
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Box joints in the end of a long board

I'm making a bookshelf, it's 7ft long. I'd like to use a box joint to connect the ends to the verticals, but the only jigs I've seen, home made or purchased, require the board standing up on your table saw or router. I can't imagine it's too practical running a 7ft board along my saw or router table on end. What I'd like is some method where the board is flat and my router can be held horizontally to make the passes across the end.

Has anyone seen such a jig, or is hand-cutting :shiver: the only way?
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post #2 of 26 Old 04-05-2020, 09:10 PM
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Roy Underhill would use a back saw and coping saw.

.
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post #3 of 26 Old 04-05-2020, 09:34 PM
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I hope you're in a hurry to get this done...


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post #4 of 26 Old 04-05-2020, 09:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homestd View Post
I hope you're in a hurry to get this done...
I'm not following you? I'm possibly stuck in the house for a long time, so actually no rush.
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post #5 of 26 Old 04-05-2020, 09:50 PM
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Frankly, I like the marking and hand-sawing approach the best.

This jig might work for you. Watch this video:

Here is the website with the plans:
https://www.woodsmithshop.com/episodes/season12/1207/

Season 12 plans are still available for free, and if you search on the page for "Episode 12 Plans: Finger Joint Jig", you can download it, but an email registration is required. Get the plans while you can. Each new season, they drop an older season off the "free plans" list. I think they only make three seasons available for free.

Note: There are requirements for choosing the correct router bits to use with this jig. Read the plans.

I am not sure how I would arrange it for a 7 foot board, but it seems like a possible approach for a long board if you insist on power tools.
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post #6 of 26 Old 04-05-2020, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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I actually built that jig, and just could not get it near as accurate as the tried and true "hop over the pin" technique on the table saw. So I have the parts of it, and you're right I'm sure there would be a way to attach it to a horizontal board. But from my last experience with it, I suspect hand-cutting would give me more success.
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post #7 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 12:09 AM
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somethin similar ......

I needed to slot the ends of some bed rails for the metal attaching hooks, but the board was on end on the table saw:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/...97/#post103622












The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-06-2020 at 12:15 AM.
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post #8 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 01:24 AM
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As it has been said a back saw and coping saw is good advice. Although I would use a sharp chisel to get a good clean fitting joint. And because you'll be cutting sideways or extreme up and down use a Japanese Pull Saw.

The real key is to layout the joints carefully.

The other solution is to move your router table out onto the driveway.
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post #9 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 06:22 AM
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Mine was only 4', but if you have the ceiling height, I'd give it a try.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f5/h...-joint-201930/
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post #10 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 07:47 AM
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Our ancestors made those joints with hand tools and the boards laid flat. With care and patience you can also.


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post #11 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homestd View Post
I hope you're in a hurry to get this done...
Sorry, I meant I hope you're not in a hurry...
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post #12 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoThankyou View Post
As it has been said a back saw and coping saw is good advice. Although I would use a sharp chisel to get a good clean fitting joint. And because you'll be cutting sideways or extreme up and down use a Japanese Pull Saw.

The real key is to layout the joints carefully.

The other solution is to move your router table out onto the driveway.
After contemplating all the input, I think I'm leaning toward saw/chisel/coping saw here. The idea of standing this 7ft board up vertically on the table saw just seems out of the picture. I'm not sure it would even fit under my ceiling, actually.

Nobody suggested laying my table saw down on it's side, fortunately :)
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post #13 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 11:21 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron_J View Post
Mine was only 4', but if you have the ceiling height, I'd give it a try.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f5/h...-joint-201930/
Thanks Ron, actually that technique suggested by FrankC on this thread, of running the board horizontally into the dado stack does sound intriguing. I'll take a look at that setup and see if it could work.

Dave
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post #14 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 02:47 PM
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That turned out great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron_J View Post
Mine was only 4', but if you have the ceiling height, I'd give it a try.

https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f5/h...-joint-201930/
Your photos pasted here from the link above by Ron J:









The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #15 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 03:48 PM
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Couldn't find any post by Franks C here ....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Mills View Post
Thanks Ron, actually that technique suggested by FrankC on this thread, of running the board horizontally into the dado stack does sound intriguing. I'll take a look at that setup and see if it could work.

Dave

Can you provide the post?

However, If I am envisioning this correctly, I see two issues. The back side will have partially radiused dados which won't look so good, more like a mistake.
I can't envision an indexing pin for accurate spacing like you would have on the miter gauge with the piece held vertically....
I guess if it were me, I'd first make a finger template for the spacing from a 24" long X 4 " high X 3/4" or 1/2" thick plywood scrap using the traditional miter gauge and pin. Then using that as my template, rout the fingers in the ends of the boards laying flat and clamped to the work table You would use a top bearing flush trim bit in 1/2" or or 5/8" or 3/4" diameter what ever spacing you prefer.



I see this was already posted above, but it's a cool idea:


more jigs here:
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...+from+template

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-06-2020 at 04:09 PM.
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post #16 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 05:12 PM
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It was not a link, post #24 in the tread:

Late to the party, there is a way to cut box joints on very long boards, if the inside of the corner is hidden such an apron for a table.

Reverse your miter gauge and make the standard back board and pin jig with the pin facing you, you will be raising the dado blade as high as possible so the end of the back board will be cut off.

The board lays flat on the saw and you push it through endways into the dado blade, fix a stop behind the miter gauge to make cuts of an even depth as you move the board from one notch to the next one. To keep the board straight the fence is moved tight to the board once the notch is on the pin.

The back of the cuts will be deeper due to the curvature of the blade but the front will fit like any other dado. If you wish you can hand finish the cuts deeper on the front for a tight joint.

This will also work for a chest that will be lined with cedar which will cover up the inside of the corner.
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post #17 of 26 Old 04-06-2020, 06:02 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Can you provide the post?
Here you go - https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f5/h...2/#post2000280

Quote:
However, If I am envisioning this correctly, I see two issues. The back side will have partially radiused dados which won't look so good, more like a mistake.
I can't envision an indexing pin for accurate spacing like you would have on the miter gauge with the piece held vertically....
I agree as far as the back side, and FrankC mentions that. But as far as the pins and spacing, his suggestion may have the same accuracy as the typical one? I'd be curious to hear your feedback, if you have any further thoughts after reading his post.
Quote:
I guess if it were me, I'd first make a finger template for the spacing from a 24" long X 4 " high X 3/4" or 1/2" thick plywood scrap using the traditional miter gauge and pin. Then using that as my template, rout the fingers in the ends of the boards laying flat and clamped to the work table You would use a top bearing flush trim bit in 1/2" or or 5/8" or 3/4" diameter what ever spacing you prefer.
Good thought, that may just be worth giving a test! Would plywood be better for the template than a scrap piece of hardwood?
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post #18 of 26 Old 04-08-2020, 03:29 PM
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dave mills, I have a jig that I made for cutting 3/4" wide x 3/4" deep finger joints. Board lays flat, any width, any length. Slip the jig onto the end and cut with a 3/4" router bit. The drawback is that you cut one tooth, unclamp the jig and move it over. Then cut the next tooth. One at a time. It's a slow process, but accurate. If you are really interested in that I will try to set it up to show you what it looks like and how it works. I don't do videos, and right now, I am doing finish work in my shop, so I cannot actually cut a joint at this moment. But here's a picture of the joints it makes.
Box joints in the end of a long board-img017.jpg
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post #19 of 26 Old 04-08-2020, 05:45 PM Thread Starter
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Mark, thank you for the photo and offer. I'm building a jig to do exactly that, and will drop you a note if I get stuck somewhere :)

Dave
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post #20 of 26 Old 04-09-2020, 03:29 PM
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I will be done with finish work in two days, then I actually need to get out that jig and do a test run on it because I will be making finger joints on a console I am building next. It's not a joint I use a lot so I always need to do a test before cutting the joints. I will post pictures of it and the process, then, for anyone who wants to see it. If I can video it, I will.
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