Best wood for kitchen utensils - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 27 Old 09-22-2018, 10:15 PM
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Most finishes are food safe after they dry and cure. A lot of companies make food safe finishes just to make more money.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #22 of 27 Old 09-23-2018, 01:20 AM
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Most finishes are food safe after they dry and cure. A lot of companies make food safe finishes just to make more money.
Right, but Robson Valley mentioned an "oven-baked olive oil finish" -- not a commercial finish-- in which the olive oil "cannot oxidize (go rancid)"

I wonder why not, since the surface oil is exposed to the air, and typically, olive oil that is exposed to the air will eventually go rancid (oxidize).
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post #23 of 27 Old 09-23-2018, 04:08 PM
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Robson, my grandmother had a big wooden spoon for stirring
jams and jellies and the bottom half was a really nice chocolate
color from decades of good old home style cooking.
my grandfather carved it out of a limb of an orange tree with his pocket knife.
it had a hefty handle just as you described for poor old arthritic hands to hold firmly.
(and to warm a young boys hind end if he was the mischievous type).
my daughter has that spoon in her family stash. (c.1950)
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post #24 of 27 Old 09-23-2018, 09:35 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
Robson, my grandmother had a big wooden spoon for stirring
jams and jellies and the bottom half was a really nice chocolate
color from decades of good old home style cooking.
my grandfather carved it out of a limb of an orange tree with his pocket knife.
it had a hefty handle just as you described for poor old arthritic hands to hold firmly.
(and to warm a young boys hind end if he was the mischievous type).
my daughter has that spoon in her family stash. (c.1950)
My mother has a giant bowl with all her cooking utensils in it. Still to this day when she gets a spoon from that bowl and I hear the familiar *rattle rattle* of the utensils shifting, it immediately grabs my complete and undivided attention, haha.

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post #25 of 27 Old 09-24-2018, 01:56 PM
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Capillary action will slowly perfuse the wood. That depends on molecular size, temperature and time.
It doesn't replace the wood air. Soak for days = will that last, stirring stew. No.

Charles Law predicts that heating that wood will expand that wood air and push out the oil finish
to be replaced by whatever the hot liquid was at that time (soup?).
This is why old wooden spoons look black like the bottom of a compost bin = that is what they have become.

This seems to me to be the major reason for a really penetrating oil finish.
I'm done forever in 3 minutes and 30 seconds.

Oxidation? Possible. As a % of the wood surface area, very little oil can be exposed to the air.
I ignore it. Use the oil finish of your choice. Pharmaceutical-grade mineral oil doesn't oxidize.
I buy Iliada Kalamata Greek olive oil in 3-liter tins. Has been working for me for years now.

I carved a kitchen slop-dish in birch to hold wet sponges, sink stoppers, scrub pads, etc.
I painted it with bees wax. Knowing that waxes all melt at about 150F or so, into the 325F oven.
That dish is now permanently waterproof.
It took me a week to clean all the wax spatters off my stove top = ultra messy.
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post #26 of 27 Old 09-26-2018, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
could the folks that use "mineral oil and beeswax" expand on how
the concoction is made ?? what amounts of oil and wax, how are they combined,
in a heated pot or microwave, how is the mixture stored and used. . . . yada yada yada.
this would help new members make their own mixture, if they so desired to do so.
I mixed some up. I don't remember the ratio, some info I found online. The bee's wax took some searching until I found a local bee keeper. Just get it hot enough to mix together, pot, microwave, whatever. I have not found it to be very long lasting.
I did not make it but my favorite stirring spoon is olive wood. I believe the wood is rather expensive.

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post #27 of 27 Old 12-02-2018, 11:46 PM
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I have made several kitchen utensils and Dogwood is my favorite. I use food grade oil and bees wax mixture. For eating spoons I just soak them at least overnight in a ziplock with oil of preference, no wax.

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Last edited by lodgewoodart; 12-02-2018 at 11:50 PM.
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