Best Wood Filler that acts like wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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Best Wood Filler that acts like wood

Suppose you've taken a chunk out of a piece of wood that's about 1/2" deep and 1" square and you end up regretting that.

As an alternative to starting the piece all over again, what's the best product and technique, if any, for filling in the hole so that it becomes like the wood it replaces: sandable, paintable, (but no need to match stain) and able to accept screws, etc?

Do you fill the hole in in stages? Is there anything that comes in a, like. cork gun tube that serves this purpose?

Thanks. Matching color is not an issue.

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post #2 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 10:48 AM
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photos would get us all on the same page as you.
most wood "issues" are handled in different ways with different products.
will the project be painted, stained or clear coated ?
and I think you are referring to a caulking gun vs cork gun ?

.
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post #3 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 10:58 AM
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Make the hole nice with crisp edges. Make a block of wood from the same species just a little smaller than the hole, but a little higher than the depth of the hole. Try to match the grain. Glue the block into the hole and remove the portion of the block sticking above the board.
Hope this makes sense.

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post #4 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 01:09 PM
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without a picture....

from the makers of JB Weld (every mechanics friend) i give you JB WoodWeld

https://www.amazon.com/J-B-Weld-8251.../dp/B004NB3OMS


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post #5 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 03:29 PM
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Bondo would be my product of choice.
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post #6 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyWeekends View Post
Make the hole nice with crisp edges. Make a block of wood from the same species just a little smaller than the hole, but a little higher than the depth of the hole. Try to match the grain. Glue the block into the hole and remove the portion of the block sticking above the board.
Hope this makes sense.
This will look much better than any putty.
If you match the grain carefully it will be (almost) invisible.
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post #7 of 12 Old 06-02-2020, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
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Bondo would be my product of choice.
While Bondo would fit the bill for sandable and paintable, it would shatter if a screw were driven directly into it. In fact, the screw requirement really precludes most of the fillers. Most formulas are simply too brittle, unless maybe a pilot hole were drilled. Success would would still be a roll of the dice. Products like Bondo also do not shrink nor expand much, if any, with temperature and humidity changes. If the wood comes and goes very much, cracks are likely to form around the edges of the repair.

Someone mentioned fitting a chunk of wood in the void. That is probably a better idea all around if screws will be driven in that area. If no screws then several different brands of fillers would work to at least some degree.
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Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
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post #8 of 12 Old 06-03-2020, 08:57 AM
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Like Woody says, I'd use a wood plug. If you use a water based glue like Titebond, let it cure for a day or two before you trim it or the edges won't stay flush. If you are trying to minimize the visual effect or maximize the strength, the best plug may not be a simple square and may be bigger than the hole. I've turned hole saws into plug cutters to patch round knot holes, and I find the curved edge calls less attention to itself than a straight cross grain line. A short patch will be more likely to split if you drive a screw through it. A patch longer than it needs to be will retain more long grain integrity.
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post #9 of 12 Old 06-03-2020, 09:36 AM
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Exactly, it's woodworking!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyWeekends View Post
Make the hole nice with crisp edges. Make a block of wood from the same species just a little smaller than the hole, but a little higher than the depth of the hole. Try to match the grain. Glue the block into the hole and remove the portion of the block sticking above the board.
Hope this makes sense.

Wood will act like wood. Just make your block first, with square corners and a smidge larger than the hole. Using a very sharp blade like an Exacto, to scribe all around the edges of the block with the grain running the same direction as the surrounding wood. Then using the sharpest chisel you own, carefully pare down to the scribed lines. This is a good video of that process:


When it's an exact fit, glue it and tap it into the opening/hole but leave just enough sticking above to plane and sand flush. No need to be heavy handed here. It will hold just fine. It should be totally seamless and you would have to know where it's at to find it. It will even stain up quite well.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-03-2020 at 09:38 AM.
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post #10 of 12 Old 06-04-2020, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyWeekends View Post
Make the hole nice with crisp edges. Make a block of wood from the same species just a little smaller than the hole, but a little higher than the depth of the hole. Try to match the grain. Glue the block into the hole and remove the portion of the block sticking above the board.
Hope this makes sense.
I'm not a professional but this is good advice and exactly what I did and it worked great. It required patience and time but it turned out great. I had a chunk taken out of a project I was doing with red oak and I just cut a long sliver down from the same wood (scrap pieces) and lightly tapped it into the crack with glue and sanded it.
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post #11 of 12 Old 06-04-2020, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noek View Post
I'm not a professional but this is good advice and exactly what I did and it worked great. It required patience and time but it turned out great. I had a chunk taken out of a project I was doing with red oak and I just cut a long sliver down from the same wood (scrap pieces) and lightly tapped it into the crack with glue and sanded it.
Dang! Better 'n Photoshop! Well done!
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post #12 of 12 Old 06-04-2020, 06:43 PM
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Repairing a split off corner using wood .....

In the process of making this chisel storage box I split off a small section of the corner. It wouldn't do to use anything other than rear wood that matched, so I planed a flat on it and glued on a larger triangle section. Then I planed that down flush and it turned out great:








The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-04-2020 at 08:29 PM.
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