best wood for cutting board? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 40 Old 01-20-2008, 11:50 AM
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Hey Texas Timbers, where in TX are you located? I can stop by and help you get rid of some of that nasty Mesquite you got :)
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post #22 of 40 Old 12-31-2012, 09:49 PM
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Ahhh. Been saving bookmarks since around 1997. A few still work.
The truth on cutting boards. Gotta love wood !
"It revealed that those using wooden cutting boards in their home kitchens were less than half as likely as average to contract salmonellosis (odds ratio 0.42, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.81), those using synthetic (plastic or glass) cutting boards were about twice as likely as average to contract salmonellosis (O.R. 1.99, C.I. 1.03-3.85); and the effect of cleaning the board regularly after preparing meat on it was not statistically significant (O.R. 1.20, C.I. 0.54-2.68). We know of no similar research that has been done anywhere, so we regard it as the best epidemiological evidence available to date that wooden cutting boards are not a hazard to human health, but plastic cutting boards may be.

"http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/fa...ttingboard.htm
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post #23 of 40 Old 01-01-2013, 03:28 PM
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Cutting boards for decorative purposes and gifting are made from whatever scraps left over from other projects. Closed grained woods are preferred.

If you were buying wood for cutting boards, then the hard maple with maybe a bit of cherry, walnut or other highlighting is good. Mineral oil seems to be the only finish. To look like a shiny finish you can sand to 400-600 before the oil.
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post #24 of 40 Old 01-01-2013, 04:12 PM
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I made some boards for Christmas gifts. Mostly made from maple; some with a few strips of walnut. These were my first attempt so I used the KISS method, keep it simple, stupid! :-)
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post #25 of 40 Old 01-01-2013, 04:48 PM
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Cool

MT:

Nice bunch of cutting boards!

Happy New Year!
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post #26 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 07:42 AM
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From a knife maker's point of view who has done a lot of research on this subject , in my opinion the best wood would be something that is stabilized like a good quality resin laminate or bamboo ! The best i have seen is one that was made from bamboo floor boards , cut and stacked so the grain runs top to bottom and stabilized with a low viscosity resin ! The big advantage of this is that the pores are closed so it will not absorb any nasties and bamboo has good ani-bacterial qualities ! Other than that pretty much any wood with a very small grain structure and that is not toxic will do the trick ! Now as for knives going blunt , if you use a good quality knife and you do not scrape the cutting edge on the board it will keep and edge much better that say a wood cutting board from any of the major chain stores !
Jack-Knife

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post #27 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 09:53 AM
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Hard maple. Second choice: soft maple. Soft maple gets no respect from a lot of woodworkers, but it's really a lovely wood. It's "soft" relative to hard maple, but it's just as hard as cherry, and we don't talk about cherry being too soft.

White oak would be ok, but maple in my mind is ideal for its tight grain.

Walnut is also nice as an accent, but it likes to get fuzzy after wetting. You can solve the fuzz problem by finishing the walnut with a hand plane rather than sanding. It was surprising to me at first, but something about cleanly severing the wood fibers vs abrading them away really kept the walnut my cutting board glassy smooth, even after a couple months of use.

I'd worry about exotics for their potential toxicity. Not to mention the price. If mesquite is available to you that'd be great option. Also fruit tree woods - apple, pear, peach, plum. All quite hard and fine grained. But none of those are generally as easy income by in board form as maple.

I use mineral with some beeswax dissolved in it. You can buy a similar product that's usually sold as cutting board "butter" or something like that. You could use straight mineral oil.
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post #28 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 12:17 PM
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Cutting Boards, Butcher Block, and related Items

Quote:
Originally Posted by dublinmark View Post
I've been asked to make a cutting board for someone. I've never made one before so looking for some advice...best wood?

I think that most butcher blocks are oak, is that right?

what is a good contrasting wood to use?

construction?

Can I just glue up wide boards or am I better off making smaller boards to prevent warping?

cup up, cup down, or vary?

It needs to be kinda thick because she wants channels for the juice to drain down.

Finish? butcher block oil only?
Hello Mark,

Your question on this is probably one of the most common I see and/or get...Butcher Block...Whats the best wood? etc. I have been meaning to write a good response so I can just send folk to it or "copy and paste" it. So here we go:

Cutting Boards, Butcher Block, and related Items

First, let me validate my perspectives on this topic and why I have drawn the conclusions I offer...

I have been a traditional woodworker for over 40 years, much of that while working within other professions, but always keeping my hand in the professional side of it. One of the most sought after items are those for the Kitchen and the ubiquitous "Butcher Block" being asked for most often. I have gotten to watch the complete evolution of these over time from "plastic is best" in the late 70's and 80's...until we all learned through the events of actual human deaths, that plastic actually can (once cut on enough and not properly cleaned) grow bacteria in all the cut marts to the point of being unserviceable. This can happen at a very alarming rate!!! Even though many are still in service, little can change a human habit once formed, so many still cut on plastic. Then studies came out proving the logic of our forbears that "wood is good" because there are some species (Acer Species...aka Maples and related) that actually have antimicrobial properties within the wood itself, and cleaning them is nothing more than vinegar and/or citric acid. I have designed and made everything from working Harvest Tables to full on professional "stump style" and "butch blocking" traditional cutting surfaces for everything from Butchery, and Bakery, to Abattoir facilities. That history is what facilitated the advice below offered.

Hands down, the best wood for "cutting surfaces" are going to be Maples and related species. Its been that way for literally over 1000 years, and only the last 100 have we "experimented" with other materials and woods. Most of which don't come close to the performance of Maple and many are just plain bad to use.

As to construction, I promote "End Grain" orientation whenever possible. If on the flat...bark up only!!!!...as this has the shortest fiber pattern exposure (aka splinters) and follows the traditional adage of: "use wood as it stands living or fall in the forest." That's not a hard and fast rule but a very dominantly found tradition with very strong logic behind it. If wood is used for a cutting board (or a floor board) with the "pith side up" the splinters get longer and the fiber structure can trap liquids down inside the wood!!! My minimum thickness for 90% of what I design and/or make for a cutting board is 100mm and I prefer actual "stump style" blocks at 300mm that can be resurfaced and last over 100 years in continued use. I prefer green wood over dry, and joinery over glues whenever possible...

As to finishes, I only use food grade oils and beeswax for all but the cutting surface. There are countless blends out there, but just plain pure food grade Tung or Flax oil rubbed into the wood is standard by many. Beeswax cut in with citrus oil which also is a great cleaning agent in its own right. Note that some Chief and others do not want any "drying oil" used on their boards...at all!!! I support this and understand the reason, as they can trap bacteria and/or taint the flavor of the food. Some want it just bare wood, while others (me included) will use Coconut oil (my all time favorite) or Olive Oil which both have been used for over 1000 years. As to going rancid...NO, they do not...IF...the surface is cleaned properly after each use and wiped down with fresh oil that is blotted off with warm water...

Before I end this post, let me speak to the other woods often used, that probably shouldn't be. One of the most common currently isn't a wood at all...Its a grass!!...and that would be Bamboo. Now I love bamboo, and it is a pretty cool material to say the least. Why don't I like it for cutting boards. The main reason is it dulls the crap out of good knives because of the natural silica content in the cell structure of the plant. I also know that many fall apart because they are not made well. Like most (if not all) good cutting surfaces...END GRAIN IS BEST!!!...and if (I have made a few lite duty ones) I make one of Bamboo, it is only made with an "end grain" orientation. Channeling in the surface needs to be of a nature (like V channel) that can be cleaned well and easily if these are used at all. I don't recommend them nor put them on my projects.

The next group are "nut woods." I don't recommend any of these typically because of allergic reactions and toxicity, as well as, tainting the flavor of foods, which they can do. These same reasons are why I personally do not ever recommend tropical or other "unknown" hardwoods, as many of these too can taint flavor or have toxins in them or the potential to. Cherry to has a distinct flavor to those with sensitive palates, as well as silicate in the fibers. Oaks and related species are entirely too full of tannic acid, and are "open celled" which is not a good thing to have on a cutting surface!!

Good Luck with your project!

j
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post #29 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 01:55 PM
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I agree that the Maple species are the Best for cutting boards.

Red Oak is probably the worst because of its open grain; White oak would be better, BUT, no cigar.

Mineral Oil, IMHO is the safest way to finish a cutting board... Why take chances?

Maybe this subject can finally be put to REST? :)
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post #30 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 02:35 PM
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Why not Mineral Oils...???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Lyddon View Post
I agree that the Maple species are the Best for cutting boards.

Red Oak is probably the worst because of its open grain; White oak would be better, BUT, no cigar.

Mineral Oil, IMHO is the safest way to finish a cutting board... Why take chances?

Maybe this subject can finally be put to REST? :)
There really aren't any real "chances" (or reasons) not to use the proven and historical oil finishes that have been around for millenia. For one primary reason, unlike Mineral Oils, they don't flavor (in a negative fashion) the foods that are prepared on cutting surfaces treated with them.

The "current thoughts" of them going rancid is not really based on much more then current urban legends. Can a "non drying oil" go rancid? Not really, per se, they can go stale or get contaminated, but that is a different matter entirely, and more to do with not properly cleaning a cutting surface routinely...or...they can be low grade and contaminated to begin with.

Mineral Oil treatment are "new concept" based more on trend (and the petroleum industry pushing product use) than in a good practice based on known (and proven) traditions. I know of few Chiefs that would tolerate mineral oil ever getting anywhere near a dish they are preparing. Mineral oils are not a material of "food"...they have (depending on manufacture) very strong tastes/flavors, and are actually a laxative. No qualities I want around food or food prep surfaces.

Mineral oils are touted as colorless and odorless but do have a strong flavor, especially to those with sensitive palates. As a by-product of the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline they really have no place near food preparation surfaces. It's long been used as a common ingredient in lotions, creams, ointments, and cosmetics, but even these are now being determined to be poor for human skin contact over duration. It's lightweight and inexpensive for industry to manufacture from waste byproduct and that is the main reason it has been so thoroughly marketed in many products.

For me, and what I have seen, this is one of those materials that came into fashion based on "marketing" not really good practice or tradition...

My 2

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post #31 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 02:46 PM
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I second coconut oil for cutting boards. I find coconut oil to be the wd40 of the kitchen. I also use it on my cast iron cookware and to protect carbon steel cutlery.
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post #32 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 02:49 PM
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Coconut oil is OK, but just be aware that there are people that have severe allergic reactions to coconut. Same with walnut oil.

Nobody's allergic to mineral oil and beeswax.

I've also never heard of a flax allergy, FWIW.
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post #33 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 02:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay C. White Cloud View Post
There really aren't any real "chances" (or reasons) not to use the proven and historical oil finishes that have been around for millenia. For one primary reason, unlike Mineral Oils, they don't flavor (in a negative fashion) the foods that are prepared on cutting surfaces treated with them.

The "current thoughts" of them going rancid is not really based on much more then current urban legends. Can a "non drying oil" go rancid? Not really, per se, they can go stale or get contaminated, but that is a different matter entirely, and more to do with not properly cleaning a cutting surface routinely...or...they can be low grade and contaminated to begin with.

Mineral Oil treatment are "new concept" based more on trend (and the petroleum industry pushing product use) than in a good practice based on known (and proven) traditions. I know of few Chiefs that would tolerate mineral oil ever getting anywhere near a dish they are preparing. Mineral oils are not a material of "food"...they have (depending on manufacture) very strong tastes/flavors, and are actually a laxative. No qualities I want around food or food prep surfaces.

Mineral oils are touted as colorless and odorless but do have a strong flavor, especially to those with sensitive palates. As a by-product of the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline they really have no place near food preparation surfaces. It's long been used as a common ingredient in lotions, creams, ointments, and cosmetics, but even these are now being determined to be poor for human skin contact over duration. It's lightweight and inexpensive for industry to manufacture from waste byproduct and that is the main reason it has been so thoroughly marketed in many products.

For me, and what I have seen, this is one of those materials that came into fashion based on "marketing" not really good practice or tradition...

My 2

j

What I meant by "why take Chances"... People CAN BE allergic to all kinds of stuff now days; Nut Oils, NUT anything. To my knowledge, no one has reported being allergic to Mineral Oil; Therefore, My Comment, "Why take any chances".

I use Mineral Oil & will continue to use Mineral Oil for those same reasons.

I hope this is now crystal CLEAR...
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post #34 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 05:23 PM
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.... argument against mineral oil
seldom have I seen a bigger pile of BS.
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post #35 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 06:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
.... argument against mineral oil
seldom have I seen a bigger pile of BS.
YEP...

Looks like "FAKE NEWS" is getting this far now! :) :(

I take swig of Mineral Oil once in awhile... I can't taste anything about it! I just drink it and get on with it...
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post #36 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerrys View Post
I second coconut oil for cutting boards. I find coconut oil to be the wd40 of the kitchen. I also use it on my cast iron cookware and to protect carbon steel cutlery.
I couldn't agree more!

WD40 of the Kitchen...LOL!!! ...I love that. That is going to get used now for sure!


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremymcon View Post
Coconut oil is OK, but just be aware that there are people that have severe allergic reactions to coconut. Same with walnut oil. Nobody's allergic to mineral oil and beeswax. I've also never heard of a flax allergy, FWIW.
I might need to go back (someday) and correct the post if I wasn't clear that the "cutting surface" doesn't get treated often and/or only by very specific materials that are "food safe" and/or "food/flavor neutral." Apologies if I was not clear on that matter.

Flax Oil (aka Linseed)...Tung Oil...Walnut Oil...Hemp Seed Oil...are all forms of "drying oils" only go onto the area not employed for food prep. I would never (in my professional experience making these items) place these on the cutting surface...other than Walnut Oil. That I will use by "request only" and I give a warning about allergies. It is an excellent ($$$$) oil, and base mix oil for many traditional finishes. And yes, there are those that are allergic to all these forms of "drying oils" too...Both by ingestion and dermal exposure...This is very rare in all but Walnut Oil...which is much more common.

I would note, the reason Coconut Oil is one of (if not my primary) favorite oils for food prep surfaces is its very neutral affect as a food grade/based "non-drying oil." Even more so than Olive Oil. Anaphylaxis is extremely rare with coconut or coconut oils, and one of the reasons it has been used safely for so long historically. Contact dermatitis is also virtual nonexistent with Coconut Oils....Nothing is 100% safe...other than dry wood, which some do prefer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Lyddon View Post
What I meant by "why take Chances"... People CAN BE allergic to all kinds of stuff now days; Nut Oils, NUT anything. To my knowledge, no one has reported being allergic to Mineral Oil; Therefore, My Comment, "Why take any chances".

I use Mineral Oil & will continue to use Mineral Oil for those same reasons....
Hello Joe,

You where very clear the first time, and by all means use mineral oil if you wish to....No problem here with your personal choice.

The recommendations I offered on this subject are based on my and a wide spectrum of professional that make such items as cutting boards, butcher blocks and related... Which is what this post thread that Mark started is all about......including Chiefs and related food preparation professionals. In my experience, they do not recommend this material be part of the food prep system.

Because of this, and for readers trying to learn, I would stress again...That a byproduct of the gasoline industry's waste stream...is not looked at professionally by many to be "good practice" in application of food preparation surfaces, no mater what current marketing trends are prevailing...and considering...the long and supportive history of much more safe, natural and food friendly finishing systems already in place and proven to work well over centuries...Nor do theses have the environmental impact of the petroleum industry at large.

A dry surface only cleaned with vinegar and/or citrus juice would be preferable over this gasoline by product...I hope this is crystal CLEAR...
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post #37 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 08:04 PM
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the freaky BS is subject to real facts:

JohnBoos.com

Use only John Boos Mystery Oil or Boos Block Cream when oiling your cutting board. An quick alternative would be to use mineral oil only. DO NOT USE ANY TYPE OF COOKING OIL ON YOUR WOOD CUTTING BOARDS. THIS WILL DAMAGE YOUR BOARDS.

John Boos Mystery Oil:
This fine oil is a mixture of white mineral oil & beeswax,
Boos Block Cream :
Made with a blend of all natural unbleached beeswax and food-grade mineral oil, Boos Cream is safe for use on food prep surfaces.

both of these items are NSF certified. here's what that means:
"Millions of people take the safety of their food, water and consumer products for granted on a daily basis. Why? Because of three letters: NSF. NSF certification is your key to making sure that the products you use meet strict standards for public health protection."

US CFR Title 21 contain specifications and explicitly approves mineral oil:
"Mineral oil may be safely used as a component of nonfood articles intended for use in contact with food, subject to the provisions of this section:"

the Boardsmith:
Use a product that is (1) edible; and (2) tasteless. USP-grade mineral oil is a popular choice as it is the cheapest pure food-grade oil you can buy (do not use vegetable or olive oil because it can turn rancid).

baby oil is scented mineral oil. if this stuff was so dangerous the FDA would have it off the market.
hairum scarum uneducated opinions are hardly helpful if you are interested in how to care for a cutting board.
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post #38 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 09:23 PM
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Well, I sure hope Mark comes back to discuss his cutting board he started on about ten years ago.
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post #39 of 40 Old 03-22-2018, 09:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
the freaky BS is subject to real facts:...hairum scarum uneducated opinions are hardly helpful if you are interested in how to care for a cutting board.
Hello Tom,


First, lets dial back the snarky attitude, and comments like "freaky BS," "fake news," and "Hairum scarum."

These are neither productive parlance, nor conducive to useful conversations. Nor is this going to be helpful to Mark (et al) in making informed decisions about the post topic.

As to "real facts,"...

Unlike many that post on forums, I can share information without "googling" it. I can pull from my own memory, experiences, and files 98% of the information I hope most would find of some value and/or use.

I have share nothing, thus far, that can't be confirm from multiple real sources beyond my own experiences and view points...if...someone actually care to fact check them.

I don't, on the other hand, find much value in posting link information to manufactures that have their own products, agendas and view points to sell...But that is just me.. I would much rather, if someone actually have real world life experience...especially professional...to share that is different.

I can further validate, not that it should really be necessary, that my credentials are fully online and public. I am a woodworking professional on several fronts, among other related skill sets. I have worked on and restored historic kitchen work surfaces in places like New York City, Greenwich CT, and else where that would exceed 50K and I have been part of full traditional builds in excess of $35K for related items of the culinary trades.

So, please, if you have direct experience of that nature, with differing viewpoints, by all means share them. In the interim, use whatever products you wish to on your woodworking, and if it differs from my perspective...So be it...We can respectfully agree to disagree...

j
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post #40 of 40 Old 03-23-2018, 09:52 AM
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I care to fact check your sources - please cite / link the professional woodworkers, organizations and / or professional chefs that support your position.

Boos and The Boardsmith are two of the leading providers of cutting boards. Boos does an enormous amount of commercial work.

in 35 plus years you are the single only person who maintains mineral oil and/or admixed with beewax is not appropriate for the maintenance of wood cutting board and wooden utensils.
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