best way to repair? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 06-23-2013, 12:48 AM Thread Starter
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best way to repair?

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post #2 of 18 Old 06-23-2013, 02:11 AM
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Repair what exactly?

A little more info would be helpful.

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post #3 of 18 Old 06-23-2013, 03:18 AM
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"More" info implies that some info has been provided.

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post #4 of 18 Old 06-23-2013, 07:17 AM
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If you are referring to the finish on the top, you could use touch up markers. Probably the easiest and best ways is to strip the finish off and put a fresh finish on it. It's really difficult to touch up the top of anything to where it doesn't show. To me it looks like a gel stain finish and that is one of the characteristics of that finish to flake off leaving white wood underneath. If it was me I would go back with a oil stain unless it needs to match surrounding millwork. Then it would be better to go back with the same finish.
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post #5 of 18 Old 06-23-2013, 07:39 AM
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best way to repair?]
You could try using a small artist brush and get a gel stain the right color and carefully try to draw in some smooth coverups. Use a dry one to draw off the stain.

Dismantling would be a PITA.






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post #6 of 18 Old 06-24-2013, 12:10 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the feedback. I do not need to match any surrounding woodwood, however the damage is more extensive in other areas. I'll add additional pictures tonight
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post #7 of 18 Old 06-24-2013, 06:45 PM Thread Starter
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thanks for the feedback. I do not need to match any surrounding woodwood, however the damage is more extensive in other areas. I'll add additional pictures tonight


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post #8 of 18 Old 06-24-2013, 11:43 PM
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I think that finish is worn out. As many spots as you have the only real long term solution is to refinish it. I know over the white paint and carpet is going to be more difficult but you can put down some polyethylene plastic and then cover that with cardboard or layers of newspaper and strip the finish off. Anything that drips you can pick it up and dispose of it. I often refinish kitchen cabinets where there is a linoleum floor and have never damaged a floor. If you would open your doors and windows where you could get some good ventilation you could use Kleen Strip paint and varnish remover and rinse it off with lacquer thinner. The remover is flammable so be sure to turn anything off with an open flame. Another option would be to paint the woodwork with an oil based paint. There is the risk of the varnish flaking off taking the paint with it but that would be easier to touch up.
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post #9 of 18 Old 06-26-2013, 11:17 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks steve, much appreciated. I will like go the paint route since it is easier to touch up in the future. I'll post follow up pics when i tackle this project.
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post #10 of 18 Old 06-26-2013, 11:29 AM
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I will like go the paint route since it is easier to touch up in the future. I'll post follow up pics when i tackle this project.
If you like the stained wood look, you could first try touching up the white spots with a paint color, and then use a gel stain to cover all, no stripping involved.






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post #11 of 18 Old 06-26-2013, 12:13 PM Thread Starter
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If you like the stained wood look, you could first try touching up the white spots with a paint color, and then use a gel stain to cover all, no stripping involved.






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Great idea. So utilize an oil based paint that is similar in color, than follow with gel stain?

I have never used gel stain, but will it fill in the lower spots?
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post #12 of 18 Old 06-26-2013, 02:21 PM
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Great idea. So utilize an oil based paint that is similar in color, than follow with gel stain?

I have never used gel stain, but will it fill in the lower spots?
Use the paint to fill in the light spots, or use a putty if too deep for paint. Lightly scuff sand the entire area to be stained. Try it on a small area to see if you like it. Follow directions on the stain.






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post #13 of 18 Old 06-27-2013, 12:03 AM
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Mohawk has a product called a burn in stick, they should have something comparable to it, all you need to make it work is a lighter, a credit card and a 0000 Brillo pad, I believe woodcraft may carry it or rocker, if not then go to Mohawk finishes website.

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post #14 of 18 Old 06-27-2013, 08:19 AM
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If you are going the route of burn-in I would suggest you purchase an electric burn-in knife. All it is is a soldering iron with a flat blade like almost like a putty knife. It's easy to scorch the existing finish with the heat of the knife. Not being experienced with the procedure you might get a can of burn-in lube. It retains the heat better so less likely to damage the finish. The sticks are made out of shellac and will readily melt with the heat of the knife to where you float into the crevasse and squeegee the excess off with the knife. Once cool it can be buffed out with 0000 steel wool and waxed. Just start in an inconspicuous place until you get the hang of it. It's one of those things that takes a bit of practice.

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post #15 of 18 Old 06-28-2013, 01:15 AM Thread Starter
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I reseached the burn color options on mohawks website.. i am under the assuption that once the material cools it is set. Question: does the finished product obsorb stain in the effort of a cohesive end result?

Also- i will be utilizing the lighter and credit card since it makes the project a bit more fun.

Thanks to all in advance for the invaluable imput!
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post #16 of 18 Old 06-28-2013, 06:27 AM
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I reseached the burn color options on mohawks website.. i am under the assuption that once the material cools it is set. Question: does the finished product obsorb stain in the effort of a cohesive end result?

Also- i will be utilizing the lighter and credit card since it makes the project a bit more fun.

Thanks to all in advance for the invaluable imput!
Once cooled, the shellac will not take stain in the way you are thinking. Using a gel stain, the shellac gets covered. In lieu of a lighter, which might occupy one hand, you can use an alcohol burner.






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post #17 of 18 Old 06-28-2013, 07:54 AM
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The burn-in sticks are like a hard piece of plastic. They won't accept a stain anymore than the finish would. They come in different colors and are semi-transparant and you kinda have to melt them together to match the color of the finish you are using. It is an option to fix the finish you have but in my opinion it would be far quicker and easier to refinish the wood. The burn-in isn't quick or easy. I use it on furniture where there may only be a couple of spots that need to be repaired. I think you have too many places for burn-in unless you just want to learn how to make this repair. What ever supplies you buy will nearly last forever. The sticks I have, I bought before 1994.
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post #18 of 18 Old 06-28-2013, 10:14 AM
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Personally, I'd refinish the whole thing or replace it entirely with something newer/more modern (though my rail looks almost exactly like that but no white).
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