best way to prevent movement - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 Old 06-19-2013, 10:09 PM Thread Starter
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best way to prevent movement

We have been working with many different species of woods in our tables, and making designs so boards are running in different directions. The design is then finished with 3/8 purpleheart trim going around the table and then capped with 2in zebrawood around table. I was told my another woodworker than encapsulating the other woods with this 'purpleheart' rectangle wasn't allowing the other boards to move a bit. We had one purpleheart board cup within our table but that piece was 6-8in wide, so we are now only using smaller accent strips of purpleheart. What is the best way to assure proper construction? We use dowels and titebond glue in our tops. I will post a picture if need be.

Thanks,
Vincent
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post #2 of 13 Old 06-19-2013, 10:30 PM
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I will just say hello since this is your first post. May want to do the intro if you have the time.
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post #3 of 13 Old 06-19-2013, 10:45 PM
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Welcome an yes post a picture so we can see what you see

All Pictures Posted by Bigcouger are owned by Roy Millsaps an is not to be copied or used with advertisements without the written consent of said person. Pictures are here to help guide you in your woodworking abilities an to encourage you in your wood working hobbies, not to be copied
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post #4 of 13 Old 06-19-2013, 11:04 PM
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Sounds interesting......but yes.....we'll need to see a picture to properly advise...
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post #5 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 09:47 AM Thread Starter
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hello!

thank you everyone for cordial hello...my apologies. We have been making upholstered furniture frames in brooklyn, ny for nearly 100 years. My great grandfather and grandfather were woodturners, and my father was an incredible artist and furniture maker who I was lucky to work with and learn from since I was 9. I am 41 now, and have been blessed to be working at something that is my passion for so many years now. I have attached a copy of the table and I am anxious to get your feedback. I also have a another table I will post right after this one which has similar wood interactions.

thanks,
Vincent
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post #6 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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second table

Here is the second pic. We still plan to cap with 3 3/4 zebra (photo shows only zebra added on lengths), then we will add thin purpleheart all around and finally 2in zebrawood to cap the entire table. The top thickness is around 7/8 and on the last round of zebra we rip the piece to 2in H. I then back this underneath the table with one of the colored woods and I am able to screw into the final strips of zebra from behind. This table has marblewood, zebra, peruvian walnut, ambrosia maple(center), cherry (center) and purpleheart. thoughts on this one for movement?

Thanks,
Vincent
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post #7 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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turned legs

Here are the legs. We haven't had any of these open up so far. Thoughts appreciated here as well.
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post #8 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 10:15 AM
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The first one is tough as the expansion will occur in a different direction all over the table, the second one looks more manageable

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #9 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 10:17 AM
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Welcome. That's a pretty table.

I am not certain from your description whether or not the pieces in the top are solid or veneer. If the pieces are solid wood then I would predict some movement damage will occur over time but the table is not that large so the movement may be minimal.

If the pieces were veneer (up to 1/4" thick) and laid up on some good quality plywood then I would expect it to hold up better that solid wood

best way to prevent movement-p6070214.jpg

This is a desk top I completed about 6 years ago using thick veneer over 3/4" birch plywood. It is holding up well. If you rub your hand across the top of the desk you can feel the seams between some of the pieces but there are no visible gaps and it remains nice and flat. If the top was solid wood I believe the movement would have created some bigger problems.

Bret
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post #10 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 10:44 AM
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try to choose woods woth similar and low (6-8%) moisture content. use veneers on ply if possible (LOLA). seal well. try to avert cross grain situations. large problem with things that are made here and delivered there. there can be large variance in climate moistures. i've seen beautiful furniture that was made in one place then moved, and open up something terrible. nice looking table!
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post #11 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 11:59 AM Thread Starter
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thanks!

Thank you everyone for reply. Gorgeous desk, Lola! The table is made from all solids. So far on the first table the purple cupped a bit where I have the wide boards. The table was in our shop for almost a year with no movement at all. The client is a friend of mine, so I am making him a second table. He is going to give me back the original so i can inspect it. It was also the last piece I worked on with my dad who passed away, so I was elated to get the table back...i will keep it forever.
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post #12 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 12:24 PM
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We build from predominantly southern woods. Heart Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, white and red oak.

www.vintageflooringandfurniture.com

We've had some probs with round top tables "moveing" on us, so we changed the way we reinforce the tops with (now) oak "ribs" on the bottom side. Shaped sorta like a diamond. No glue on 'em and room in the screw holes for the tops to expand and contract.
Our products go nationwide, so we've had to consider ALL the climate variations.
The square and rectangular tabletops are fastened with "Z" clips which naturally allow the expansion and contraction occur.
How are you attaching the tops to the leg sets?
Beautiful work you've done.
Bill
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post #13 of 13 Old 06-20-2013, 01:43 PM
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It can also help to rip those wide boards down, alternate the end grain patterns and re glue to a solid plank. That will minimize some of that cupping.

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